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Survive Nature - Techniques for Surviving in every Natural Environment

Survive Nature - Techniques for Surviving in every Natural Environment
When you find yourself lost in the forest, you should be alert to the fact that there are predators and they are dangerous. Try to fashion a spear or knife out of branches to use as protection. Among the many predators to watch out for, bears are the most dangerous (especially Grizzlies): Black Bears: If you see a black bear 50 yards away or more, then keep your distance and continue hiking always making sure to not get closer. If you happen to come across the bear and it doesn't see you, then carefully walk away and talk loudly to alert the bear to your presence. Grizzly Bears: If you come into direct contact with a Grizzly bear, avoid eye contact. Never run from any bear. The most dangerous scenario is to be between a mother bear and her cubs. What to do if a bear attacks: Black Bears: Fight back. Insects/Spiders: Depending on which forest you are located, there are insects and spiders that are poisonous.

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How to Read a Compass Navigation by way of compass may seem daunting at first to a beginner, but this trepidation shouldn’t stand in the way of learning to use one. In fact, once you learn how to read a compass, it will be a valued friend in the back-country — one you can always count on to help guide your steps. This guide is meant to be a general overview of the basics of learning how to read a compass, with or without a map.

7 Rock Climbing Knots Every Guy Should Know There are a lot of cool things about rock climbing, from the full-body fitness required to make it up many climbs, to the incredible ways that climbers can manage to keep their bodies on the rock, but one of the most underrated things about climbing has got to be the knots. After all, these knots aren’t just keeping shoes on your feet or a trash bag closed – they’re capable of keeping the full weight of a body from dropping right off the face of a cliff. But you don’t have to ever step foot on the rock in order to take advantage of this knowledge, as most of the common rock climbing knots can be used very effectively for other, non-climbing purposes. Here’s a selection of climbing knots that every guy (and gal) should know: 1.

Types of Shelters When looking for a shelter site, keep in mind the type of shelter (protection) you need. However, you must also consider-- How much time and effort you need to build the shelter. 100 Items to Disappear First 100 Items to Disappear First 1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy...target of thieves; maintenance etc.) 2. Water Filters/Purifiers 3. Guest Post: All Dogs Matter Invites You to Our Annual Valentines Dog Walk! Share the love with all four-legged friends this Sunday (February 15th 2015) and come along to enjoy a morning of furry fun in aid of All Dogs Matter. [Credit: Mike Coles] The morning begins at the very dog-friendly Garden Gate pub, Hampstead. Dogs and owners meet and head off across the Heath for a romantic stroll. [Credit: Dogstar Photo]

Camping Knots for Wilderness Survival By Filip Tkaczyk Knowing how to tie good camping knots is an invaluable skill in wilderness survival situations. Its also a great asset when having fun in the outdoors. There are a wealth of different knots out there that you can learn to tie. How To Build A Forest Shelter Natural shelter in the wild is a potential life saver. If you do not have a tent or bivouac with you, knowing how to make a lean-to shelter is one of the most important bush craft survival skills. So watch VideoJug's guide to building a shelter in a forest. Step 1: You will need An uprooted tree Some sturdy branches Plenty of leaves and debris from the forest floor Step 2: Preparation Do-it-yourself Survival Kit The Do-it-yourself Coffee Can Survival Kit This is a compact kit that can be carried in the car, on the boat, or in a pack for hunting, hiking, exploring, etc. Most of the contents will fit in a one-pound coffee can which doubles as a pot for melting snow and device with which to dig an emergency snow shelter.

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