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LeadingThoughts - LeadershipNow.com

LeadingThoughts - LeadershipNow.com
Related:  Creative Thought Processes

Design is also a Recursive Activity Design is also a Recursive Activity A warm welcome to you dear reader! If you have not already, why not subscribe to The Design Sojourn Newsletter and get my latest thoughts on Strategies for Good Design conveniently delivered right to your inbox? It's free! Thanks for visiting and please keep in touch? When we iterated in a Design Process, it is actually a refinement activity where one evolution gives way to the next evolution. Look out for that horizontal grey line! Enter the Dubberly Design Office’s creative process where they also consider design as also a recursive activity. The creative process is not just iterative; it’s also recursive. This process chart does make sense when you consider the many levels of design considerations a designer has to go through. Love this post?

How Great Entrepreneurs Think What distinguishes great entrepreneurs? Discussions of entrepreneurial psychology typically focus on creativity, tolerance for risk, and the desire for achievement—enviable traits that, unfortunately, are not very teachable. So Saras Sarasvathy, a professor at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business, set out to determine how expert entrepreneurs think, with the goal of transferring that knowledge to aspiring founders. While still a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon, Sarasvathy—with the guidance of her thesis supervisor, the Nobel laureate Herbert Simon—embarked on an audacious project: to eavesdrop on the thinking of the country's most successful entrepreneurs as they grappled with business problems. She required that her subjects have at least 15 years of entrepreneurial experience, have started multiple companies—both successes and failures—and have taken at least one company public. Do the doable, then push it Here's another: Woo partners first Sweat competitors later

21 Awesome Quotes on Intuition Thanks to Val Vadeboncoeur for finding most of these quotes. “The only real valuable thing is intuition.” – Albert Einstein“Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do.” – Benjamin Spock“Systems die; instincts remain.” – Oliver Wendell Holmes“It is through science that we prove, but through intuition that we discover.” – Henri Poincare“Intuition becomes increasingly valuable in the new information society precisely because there is so much data.” – John Naisbitt“A hunch is creativity trying to tell you something.” – Frank Capra “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” – Jonas Salk“All human knowledge thus begins with intuitions, proceeds thence to concepts, and ends with ideas.” - Immanuel Kant“Trust your own instinct. Image credit: financialsensearchive.com

25 Quotes on Letting Go Letting go is can be a painful yet necessary part of life. And letting go can also result in feeling free. Read these quotes on letting go. Letting go doesn't mean that you don't care about someone anymore. It's just realizing that the only person you really have control over is yourself. - Deborah Reber, Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul Some people believe holding on and hanging in there are signs of great strength. Forgiveness means letting go of the past. - Gerald Jampolsky In the process of letting go you will lose many things from the past, but you will find yourself. – Deepak Chopra Letting go helps us to to live in a more peaceful state of mind and helps restore our balance. Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values. – Dalai Lama Let go of your attachment to being right, and suddenly your mind is more open. – Ralph Marston The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. You don’t need strength to let go of something.

Home | The Creativity Post Learn How to Think Different(ly) - Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen by Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen | 10:24 AM September 27, 2011 In the Economist review of our book, The Innovator’s DNA, the reviewer wondered whether genius-level innovators such as Marc Benioff, Jeff Bezos, and Steve Jobs challenge the idea that working adults can really learn how to think differently and become innovators. We don’t think so. Remember, it was Steve Jobs who jump-started the now-famous “Think Different” advertising campaign as a way to inspire consumers and recharge Apple’s innovation efforts. It worked. Reflecting back on the campaign, Jobs said “The whole purpose of the ‘Think Different’ campaign was that people had forgotten what Apple stood for, including the employees.” Reams of relevant research (including our own) proves Jobs right. But neither Steve Jobs nor Apple nor any other high-profile innovator or company has a corner on the think-different market. Take Gavin Symanowitz, whom we recently met in South Africa. Just do It. Shake it up. Repeat.

99 Quotes About Risk to Inspire You to Great Things Throughout the ages, many have tried to put into words exactly what risk is and what it means to them. Some have been more successful than others—cutting to the heart of the matter, appealing to sensibility, or just putting an idea that’s difficult to explain into words we all can understand. Today, I want to share 99 quotes that have had the greatest impact on me and how I think about the concept of risk. I’m a big fan of quotes because they have the greatest signal to noise ratio of nearly any communication. And now I’ll get out of the way and let the words speak for themselves. Don’t listen to those who say ‘you taking too big a chance.’ The fear of death is the most unjustified of all fears, for there’s no risk of accident for someone who’s dead. – Albert Einstein Unless you choose to do great things with it, it makes no difference how much you are rewarded, or how much power you have. – Oprah Winfrey You can measure opportunity with the same yardstick that measures the risk involved.

7 Steps To Compel Creativity It is said that art imitates life. To be able to express oneself creatively is both powerful and fulfilling. True creativity resides within all of us, but because of the power of creativity those that aren’t ‘naturally gifted’ feel intimidated to even try. By breaking down the fundamental layers of creativity, we see that the process of creating art is not only simple, but can be applied to all activities of your life – whether you are organizing a file cabinet or painting a self portrait, these 7 steps will help you find art in all that you do in life. Imagine you’re painting a picture. Now, many would assume that the creative process involves simply transferring this beautiful image onto a canvas, that this is what it takes to be creative. The Subject Matter Layer In this example, nature has already given you a piece of art that anyone with a camera can share. The Creation Technique Layer In a painting, the next layer is the artist’s personal brush technique. The Perspective Layer

How a Computer Game is Reinventing the Science of Expertise [Video] A crowd observes the match playing on the main stage at the StarCraft 2 championships in Providence, RI. Credit: Major League Gaming If there is one general rule about the limitations of the human mind, it is that we are terrible at multitasking. The old phrase “united we stand, divided we fall” applies equally well to the mechanisms of attention as it does to a patriotic cause. When devoted to a single task, the brain excels; when several goals splinter its focus, errors become unavoidable. But clear exceptions challenge that general rule. For decades, a different game, chess, has held the exalted position of “the drosophila of cognitive science”—the model organism that scientists could poke and prod to learn what makes experts better than the rest of us. This real-time strategy game demands the frenetic pursuit of numerous simultaneous goals, any of which can change in the blink of an eye. Why StarCraft But that’s just one level of play. A screenshot from a StarCraft 2 game. Indeed.

Why Creative Thinking is Inclusive Thinking, by Michael Michalko Albert Einstein was once asked what the difference was between him and the average person. He said that if you asked the average person to find a needle in the haystack, the person would stop when he or she found a needle. He, on the other hand, would tear through the entire haystack looking for all the possible needles. Creative thinking is inclusive thinking. Most of us have been educated to think exclusively which means we think in deficit by focusing our attention on specific information and excluding all else. An experimental psychologist set up the task of making a pendulum. Next, another series of subjects were given the same task under slightly altered conditions. The first group failed because the weight was firmly embedded in its role as a pendulum-weight and nothing else, because it had been verbally described as such and because visually it formed a unit with a cord attached. The second group had not been primed to think of the cord and weight as a single unit.

Thinking Methods: Creative Problem Solving They further divided the six stages into three phases, as follows: 1. Exploring the Challenge (Objective Finding, Fact Finding, and Problem Finding), Generating Ideas (Idea Finding), and Preparing for Action (Solution Finding and Acceptance Finding). Description: Since the arrival of the now classical Osborn-Parnes structure, any number of academic and business entities have re-sorted and renamed the stages and phases of what we now call the Creative Problem Solving Process (CPS). The Creative Problem Solving Institute of Buffalo, New York, has finessed the Osborn-Parnes process to include a divergent and a convergent stage within each of the six stages. In his 1988 book, Techniques of Structured Problems, Arthur B. Mess FindingData FindingProblem FindingIdea FindingSolution Finding Where to Learn CPS

Crowdsourcing vs Collective Intelligence. What's the diff? Thanks to intrepid design blogger, oyster fiend, and “bro”, John DiPalma and his solid blog at DesignRising, I’ve been coerced into writing much richer blog posts about the topics that I’m exploring. So, here goes the first in a series of attempts to share some meatier topics and the findings that I’m uncovering. As the title of this blog suggests (and if you’ve ventured as far as reading the “Project” section) I’m exploring the role of collective intelligence in design. When I describe my research to people, I usually start with the description of collective intelligence, and then quickly find myself falling back on the more commonly known crowdsourcing. To date, I’ve been comfortable with considering collective intelligence as the intellectual potential of a large group of individuals to make better, more informed decisions and choices than individual experts. Collective Intelligence Crowdsourcing Is there a difference?

design principles Defeating an enemy; overcoming an obstacle; surviving in the face of adversity: success and failure are at the very core of the game-player's experience. Games offer players a number of choices, some of which lead to success and some of which lead to failure or non-success. Together with the challenges presented to the player, the fact that the player might fail lends significance to the player's choices and actions. Although failure can be a negative experience, it is also the very thing that makes success meaningful. There are two kinds of failure in games. One kind of failure concerns the player's inability to satisfy a particular success condition that nevertheless remains satisfiable, and another kind of failure takes place whenever the player encounters a particular failure condition. The manner in which a game responds to player failure is essential to its design. Progress is defined as the act of moving forward toward a goal. Further reading:

Orloev.com Do not follow the steps of your predecessors but do look for what they have been looking for. "I may not be cleverer than the others but I have a method" Rene Descartes (1596 - 1650) I first heard the name of Rene Descartes, one of the greatest minds and founder of the new philosophy during the first semesters of my university studies. The charisma of his personality, which has outlived his century, struck my mind with his impressive project - the creation of Regulaе ad directionen ingenii (Rules for guiding one's mind). In his work R.Descartes intended to present a universal method for solving problems by reducing them to solving equations. In the philosophy of Descartes's project there is profound truth and it impresses us with its grandeur, despite its untimeliness. The fantastic greatness of this project, facing indecisiveness, has marked my conscience forever. Ideas and patterns piled with time and brilliant authors and schools such as George Polya, Eduard de Bono, G.S.

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