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Sam Harris: Science can answer moral questions

Sam Harris: Science can answer moral questions

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj9oB4zpHww

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Medical Ethics and Professionalism Ethics and Professionalism ACP is devoted to policy development and implementation on issues related to medical ethics and professionalism, and is a resource for ACP members and the public. Learn More Carl Sagan Welcome to YouTube! The location filter shows you popular videos from the selected country or region on lists like Most Viewed and in search results.To change your location filter, please use the links in the footer at the bottom of the page. Click "OK" to accept this setting, or click "Cancel" to set your location filter to "Worldwide". The location filter shows you popular videos from the selected country or region on lists like Most Viewed and in search results.

The Cato Hypocrisy I have long held that the greatest tragedy, among countless misfortunes that recur in the long and agonizing human story, is not when evil triumphs over good, or when oppression overcomes freedom, or even the wretched loss of ten billion potential might-have-beens. No, the most devastating defect in our character -- a trait that held us down ever since the caves -- is the very same twist in our natures that makes us such fine storytellers. I am talking about our incredible penchant for -- and creativity at -- self delusion and rationalization. The lengths that we all go to, in order to convince ourselves that we are the smart ones, virtuous and right... often in complete denial of blatant evidence to the contrary.

Just Asking - David Foster Wallace Are some things still worth dying for? Is the American idea* one such thing? Are you up for a thought experiment? What if we chose to regard the 2,973 innocents killed in the atrocities of 9/11 not as victims but as democratic martyrs, “sacrifices on the altar of freedom”? Bioethics Forum - The Blog of the Hastings Center Report Journal editor defends retraction of GMO-rats study while authors reveal some of paper's history Retraction Watch "...claiming COPE guidelines somehow supports the decision [to retract] doesn't seem valid." Big Data + Big Pharma = Big Money Charles Ornstein, ProPublica

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The Relevance of Anarcho-syndicalism, Noam Chomsky interviewed by Peter Jay QUESTION: Professor Chomsky, perhaps we should start by trying to define what is not meant by anarchism -- the word anarchy is derived, after all, from the Greek, literally meaning "no government." Now, presumably people who talk about anarchy or anarchism as a system of political philosophy don't just mean that, as it were, as of January 1st next year, government as we now understand it will suddenly cease; there would be no police, no rules of the road, no laws, no tax collectors, no post office, and so forth. Presumably, it means something more complicated than that. CHOMSKY: Well, yes to some of those questions, no to others. They may very well mean no policemen, but I don't think they would mean no rules of the road.

Business school and ethics: Can we train MBAs to do the right thing? Photograph by iStockphoto/Thinkstock. A few years ago, Israeli game theorist Ariel Rubinstein got the idea of examining how the tools of economic science affected the judgment and empathy of his undergraduate students at Tel Aviv University. He made each student the CEO of a struggling hypothetical company, and tasked them with deciding how many employees to lay off. Some students were given an algebraic equation that expressed profits as a function of the number of employees on the payroll. Others were given a table listing the number of employees in one column and corresponding profits in the other. Simply presenting the layoff/profits data in a different format had a surprisingly strong effect on students’ choices—fewer than half of the “table” students chose to fire as many workers as was necessary to maximize profits, whereas three quarters of the “equation” students chose the profit-maximizing level of pink slips.

Principle of double effect The principle of double effect — also known as the rule of double effect; the doctrine of double effect, often abbreviated as DDE or PDE, double-effect reasoning; or simply double effect — is a set of ethical criteria which Christian philosophers, and some others, have advocated for evaluating the permissibility of acting when one's otherwise legitimate act (for example, relieving a terminally ill patient's pain) may also cause an effect one would normally be obliged to avoid (sedation and a slightly shortened life). Double-effect originates in Thomas Aquinas's treatment of homicidal self-defense, in his work Summa Theologiae.[1] This set of criteria states that an action having foreseen harmful effects practically inseparable from the good effect is justifiable if the following are true:

The Fabric of the Cosmos with Brian Greene: Watch the Complete NOVA Series Online Forget about inclined planes and pulleys. In this series from the PBS program NOVA, physics is presented as an exotic, mind-bending realm. The Fabric of the Cosmos, first broadcast in November, follows up on the 2003 Peabody Award-winning The Elegant Universe. Both series are adapted from the best-selling books of host Brian Greene, a mathematician and physicist at Columbia University. Like the earlier series, which was centered around String Theory, The Fabric of the Cosmos deals with ideas that are on the cutting edge of scientific theory. The Xtremes: Subversive Recipes for Catastrophic Times "In just a few short months, we’ve witnessed people power in action. From the Middle East to the Midwest, movements have risen up to overturn tired dogma and challenge entrenched power. Many of us were inspired by these events. And many of us were surprised. Perhaps we were growing skeptical that people power could still work. Maybe we had forgotten a vital fact about our world: that bold citizens, united around a common mission, can still come together to create major change against enormous odds." - 350.org (April 7, 2011)

Gaming The Games: The Rules That Got Bent In London : The Torch hide captionCameron van der Burgh of South Africa celebrates his gold medal in the men's 100m breaststroke. He later admitted that he took extra dolphin kicks during his swim, a violation of the rules. Adam Pretty/Getty Images Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa celebrates his gold medal in the men's 100m breaststroke. Australia's health system 2.0 Introduction Australia's health system is complex. It can perhaps be best described as a 'web': a web of services, providers, recipients and organisational structures. This chapter looks at the many components of the Australian health system, how they are organised and funded, and how they are delivered to, and used by, Australians. While for many Australians most of their contact with the health system involves a visit to a GP or pharmacist, these services are part of a much broader and complex network. Complexity is unavoidable in providing a multi-faceted and inclusive approach to meeting the health system needs of Australia's many and varied residents, when those needs are shaped by many and varied factors, including gender, age, health history and behaviours, location, and socioeconomic and cultural background.

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