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Cosmic latte

Cosmic latte
Cosmic Latte is a name assigned to the average color of the universe, given by a team of astronomers from Johns Hopkins University. Discovery of the color[edit] In 2001, Karl Glazebrook and Ivan Baldry determined that the color of the universe was a greenish white, but they soon corrected their analysis in a 2002 paper,[1] in which they reported that their survey of the color of all light in the universe added up to a slightly beigeish white. The survey included more than 200,000 galaxies, and measured the spectral range of the light from a large volume of the universe. The hexadecimal RGB value for Cosmic Latte is #FFF8E7. The finding of the "color of the universe" was not the focus of the study, which was examining spectral analysis of different galaxies to study star formation. Glazebrook's and Baldry's work was funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Naming of the color[edit] The color was displayed in a Washington Post article. References[edit] External links[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_latte

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