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Ring Could Log Users In to Houses, Phones and Website as Soon as Next Month The need for more passwords that our feeble human brains struggle to remember can make it feel like we work for the machines instead of the other way around. Wearable, and even embeddable, login storage has emerged has a possible solution. After Google researchers floated the idea of a USB stick or a ring that would generate login keys, it appeared the Web giant would lead the way. But a UK project recently closed a $380,000 Kickstarter campaign, promising delivery of 61,000 password-bearing rings in September. The company, NFC Ring, makes a simple silver ring with two near-field communication transmitters inside it, storing access information that can potentially be used to unlock phones, cars or houses or even to log in to websites. One transmitter faces out and stores information that the user may want to share, such as his or her contact information. Users won’t have to charge or update the rings because the transmitters are passive. Images courtesy NFC Ring

The Brain Scoop Welcome to The Brain Scoop, based out of The Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. We're devoted to exploring the behind-the-scenes work of natural history museums and celebrating the diversity of this amazing world. Join us! Merchandise - Tattoos and Posters! NEW! Facebook: The Brain Scoop is written and hosted by:Emily Graslie Created By: Hank Green Directed, Edited, Animated, and Scored by:Michael Aranda Production Assistant:Katie Kirby Filmed on Location and Supported by:The Field Museum in Chicago, IL( Translated captions brought to you by Alexander Austin, Lorena Pimentel Villaça, Henrik Johansen, Timo Pähler, Tony Chu, Martina Šafusová, Nur Iskandar Bin Nuruddin, John-Alan Pascoe, Arantzazu R.

Breakthrough: The World’s First Carbon Nanotube Computer "'m just wondering that, with less and less electricity required to make these "switches" in a carbon-nanotube processor work, how vulnerable does it make them to being accidentally switched by the ambient, static electricity already in the atmosphere, like from thunderstorms or generated by household appliances, etc." That is one of the reasons why you when you open your computer, you ground yourself first before touching circuit boards. I assume these new circuits would be protected and shielded in the same manner as circuits made of silicon are now. And they'd be handled with the same precautions. The same goes for EMPs. The military has long worked on methods to shield silicon chips from EMP and resist and compensate for cosmic ray damage.

The Royal Institution Create a wine glass orchestra in your kitchen and explore how sound is caused by vibrations. For more ideas, and to download an info sheet click here: Marieke and Tilly experiment with making music and doing science experiments at home. With enough glasses and little bit of practice you might be able to play 'Ode to Joy' like Marieke! ExpeRimental, brought to you by the Royal Institution of Great Britain, is a series of free short films that make it fun, easy and cheap to do science at home with children aged 4 to 10. Click here to download this activity's info sheet: For more information, visit here to subscribe for more science videos: more science videos on the Ri Channel Ri is on Twitter: Facebook:

Accelerator on a chip: Technology could spawn new generations of smaller, less expensive devices for science, medicine In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice. The achievement was reported today in Nature by a team including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. "We still have a number of challenges before this technology becomes practical for real-world use, but eventually it would substantially reduce the size and cost of future high-energy particle colliders for exploring the world of fundamental particles and forces," said Joel England, the SLAC physicist who led the experiments. "It could also help enable compact accelerators and X-ray devices for security scanning, medical therapy and imaging, and research in biology and materials science." Today's accelerators use microwaves to boost the energy of electrons.

AsapSCIENCE Follow us @mitchellmoffit & @whalewatchmeplziTunes ( Bandcamp ( It's free: Get the AsapSCIENCE book! Check out our second channel: LINKS TO FOLLOW USInstagram - Greg ( Mitch ( - Greg ( Mitch ( - Greg (whalewatchmeplz) Mitch (pixelmitch) FOLLOW ASAPSCIENCEFacebook: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC.P.O. Written and created by Mitch Moffit and Greg Brown Lyrics: I'll be the spark, if you'll be the flameStart a reaction that can't be containedBalance your pH by sharing my baseI'll be your star, if you'll be my space 'Cause there is no distance that I wouldn't goThrough spacetime and wormholes my matter would flowTo the edge of the universe 'Cause you matter to me Show less

HP Memristors Will Reinvent Computer Memory 'by 2014' | Wired Enterprise By the end of 2012, HP may introduce a new breed of electrical building-block: the memristor. Image: Luke Kilpatrick/Flickr HP is two and half years away from offering hardware that stores data with memristors, a new breed of electrical building-block that could lead to servers and other devices that are far more efficient than today’s machines, according to report citing one of the technology’s inventors. As reported by The Register, at a recent conference in Oxnard, California, HP’s Stan Williams said that commercial memristor hardware will be available by the end of 2014 at the earliest. A company spokesman tells us that the company has not officially announced its plan for memristors. But Williams’ remarks indicate that the introduction of the technology has been pushed back. “It’s sad to say, but the science and technology are the easy part,” Williams said at the recent conference. Memristor via electron microscope. “[The memristor] holds its memory longer,” Williams said.

Smarter Every Day Twitter SmarterEveryDay Loading... Working... The Backwards Brain Bicycle - Smarter Every Day 133 16,322,571 views 2 years ago Get your own here ⇒ Shirt: Support Link: ⇒ ⇐ ↓↓↓↓↓↓↓READ MORE: ↓↓↓↓↓↓↓Here's the link from the Amsterdam meetup! Other Smart Content Smarter Every Day 2 - Channel The Slow Mo Guys - Channel Veritasium - Channel minutephysics - Channel CGP Grey - Channel Vsauce - Channel Periodic Videos - Channel Numberphile - Channel Applied Science - Channel Geography Now - Channel Related channels Cody'sLab - Channel Tom Scott - Channel History Sign in to add this to Watch Later Add to Loading playlists...

HP pulls memory Missing Link from bottle of beer More than 35 years ago, when the world assumed that circuits were crafted from three basic building blocks, a man named Leon Chua predicted the existence of a fourth. The capacitor, the resistor, and the inductor, he said, would be joined by something called the memristor. Today, scientists at HP Labs announced that this prediction was right on the money. After a good five years of work, HP Labs Fellow R. Stanley Williams and his team have actually built a memristor - a resistor that stores information even after losing power. With this new electrical building block, chip manufacturers could reinvent modern memory technology, delivering machines that are far more efficient and that boot instantly. Naturally, HP is trumpeting this as a cure-all for all those data centers up in the cloud. Leon Chua's memristor wasn't much more than a math project. "He saw that there were patterns in those circuit equations, and in looking at those patterns, he noticed a hole," Williams tells us.

Veritasium The truth, with photons.I hope I've articulated everything clearly in this video. If not, I'll clarify in comments. Thanks to everyone who appears in this video and thanks to everyone who watches this video! Veritasium is of course a combination of the latin 'veritas' meaning truth, and the common element ending 'ium'. One of my inspirations for the name Veritasium came from the end of the poem Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats, in which he writes: "Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know." Special thanks to Patreon supporters:Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Jeff Straathof, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal, Nathan Hansen, Yildiz Kabaran, Terrance Snow, Stan Presolski Music from X1 - Gunnar JohnsenFluorescent Lights - Martin GauffinDissolving Patterns - Ebb & FlodLuna - Ebb & Flod Additional music by Kevin MacLeod: Snitch Show less

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