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Cajun music

Cajun music
Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Cajun-influenced zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin. These French Louisiana sounds have influenced American popular music for many decades, especially country music, and have influenced pop culture through mass media, such as television commercials. Aural analysis[edit] Cajun music is relatively harsh with an infectious beat and a lot of forward drive, placing the accordion at the center. Besides the voices, only two melodic instruments are heard, the accordion and fiddle, but usually in the background can also be heard the high, clear tones of a metal triangle. Subgenres of Cajun music[edit] Traditional Cajun[edit] Country and Texas swing Cajun[edit] Main article: Western swing This style involves heavy elements of Texas country music influence and a move away from the traditional accordion. Dancehall Cajun[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cajun_music

Cajun Music Pioneer - Joseph Falcon The special atmosphere of a real "fais do-do," a Cajun country dance, is captured here on this live recording by Cajun music innovator, Joe Falcon. He made the very first Cajun recording back in 1928, of "Allons a Lafayette," a version of which can be heard here. Falcon was one of the very first instrumentalists to bring together accordion and the more traditional fiddle on rural Louisiana folk songs. Cajun Music D.L. Menard, sometimes called the “Cajun Hank Williams,” is one of the best-known Cajun songwriters. Learn more » Cajun music is an accordion- and fiddle-based, largely francophone folk music originating in southwestern Louisiana. Most people identify Cajun music with Louisiana’s Acadian settlers and their descendants, the Cajuns, but this music in fact refers to an indigenous mixture with complex roots in Irish, African, German, Appalachian as well as Acadian traditions.

Jazz musical style and genre The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz, which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing. Modal jazz developed in the late 1950s, using the mode, or musical scale, as the basis of musical structure and improvisation. Jazz-rock fusion appeared in the late 1960s and early 1970s, combining jazz improvisation with rock music's rhythms, electric instruments, and highly amplified stage sound. In the early 1980s, a commercial form of jazz fusion called smooth jazz became successful, garnering significant radio airplay.

Cajun Music History A great specialty of the folk music of North America is that, like the nation itself, it is derived from several different cultures. When the Europeans migrated to the newly found American continent, they took with them the music of their lands. The music that we hear in North American nations as of today, is an evolved form of the music derived from several European folk traditions. The origin of Cajun music can be traced back to the Acadian colonists, who had settled down in the province of Acadia. This region stretched towards the east of Quebec, and included the Maritime provinces, parts of New England and Maine, and stretched till Philadelphia.

Introduction to Cajun, Louisiana Creole & zydeco music By Jim Hobbs Cajun, Louisiana Creole & Zydeco Music Search home Who are the Cajuns? Tejano music Tejano music or Tex-Mex music (Texan-Mexican music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Mexican-American populations of Central and Southern Texas. With roots in the late 19th century, it became a music genre with a wider audience in the late 20th century thanks to artists such as Selena (often referred to as "The Queen of Tejano"), Mazz, La Mafia, La Sombra, Elida Reyna, Elsa García, Laura Canales, Oscar Estrada, Jay Perez, Emilio Navaira, Gary Hobbs, Shelly Lares, Stefani Montiel, David Lee Garza, Jennifer Peña, and La Fiebre. Origins[edit] Europeans from Germany (first during Spanish time and 1830s), Poland, and what is now the Czech Republic migrated to Texas and Mexico, bringing with them their style of music and dance.

Rhythm and blues "R&B" redirects here. For the modern style of music also called "R&B", see Contemporary R&B. Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated to R&B or RnB, is a genre of popular African-American music that originated in the 1940s.[1] The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.[2] In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, saxophone, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy.[3] Lyrics focus heavily on the themes of triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, freedom, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term rhythm and blues has undergone a number of shifts in meaning. History[edit]

Tejano: Local Music, Global Identity Published in: GIA Reader, Vol 25, No 3 (Fall 2014), 2014 Conference Proceedings Juan Tejeda Flaco Jiménez with Los Caminantes (the band he made his first recordings with for Rio Records). San Antonio, mid to late 1950s.

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