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Carol Dweck Revisits the 'Growth Mindset'

Carol Dweck Revisits the 'Growth Mindset'
Commentary By Carol Dweck For many years, I secretly worked on my research. I say “secretly” because, once upon a time, researchers simply published their research in professional journals—and there it stayed. However, my colleagues and I learned things we thought people needed to know. We found that students’ mindsets—how they perceive their abilities—played a key role in their motivation and achievement, and we found that if we changed students’ mindsets, we could boost their achievement. So a few years back, I published my book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success to share these discoveries with educators. —Jori Bolton for Education Week This is wonderful, and the good word continues to spread. A growth mindset isn’t just about effort. We also need to remember that effort is a means to an end to the goal of learning and improving. Recently, someone asked what keeps me up at night. In many quarters, a growth mindset had become the right thing to have, the right way to think.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/09/23/carol-dweck-revisits-the-growth-mindset.html

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Science Behind Growth Mindset Over 30 years ago, Carol Dweck and her colleagues became interested in students' attitudes about failure. They noticed that some students rebounded while other students seemed devastated by even the smallest setbacks. After studying the behavior of thousands of children, Dr. Teacher: A student told me I ‘couldn’t understand because I was a white lady.’ Here’s what I did then. Emily E. Smith is a fifth-grade social justice and English language arts teacher at Cunningham Elementary School in Austin, Tex. She was just awarded the 2015 Donald H. Graves Excellence in the Teaching of Writing award given at the National Teachers of English Language Arts Convention in Minneapolis. Smith created and founded The Hive Society, a classroom that inspires children to creatively explore literature through critical thinking and socially relevant texts. In her speech accepting the award, Smith talked about a seminal moment in her career when she realized she needed to change her approach to teaching students of color, one of whom told her that she couldn’t understand his problems because she is white.

The Secret To Learning New Skills Twice As Fast Learning a new skill doesn’t depend so much on how much practice you do, but how you practice. The key is to subtly vary your training with changes that keep your brain learning. By changing up your routine, new research says, you can cut the time to acquire a new skill by half. Acquiring new motor skills requires repetition, but iterative repetition is much more effective than just doing the same thing over and over. A new study from Johns Hopkins found that modifying practice sessions led participants to learn a new computer-based motor skill quicker than straight repetition.

Creating the Conditions for Innovative Teaching and Learning – A.J. JULIANI Last weekend, as we were digging out of the twenty inches of snow, my kids were sledding in the backyard and hiding out in their igloo. My 4-yr old son had another snow day passion, filling up a plastic cup with snow to the brim and walking around calling it his “snow cone.” He wouldn’t go anywhere without his snow cone. What is Mindset Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference.

untitled ONE hundred years ago, on November 25th 1915, Albert Einstein presented his freshly finished general theory of relativity to the Prussian Academy of Sciences. It was the outcome of nearly a decade's dedicated work. He showed that the theory solved a 150-year-old problem: each year, Mercury's closest point of approach to the Sun was moving forward more than it was expected to. All manner of explanations had been put forth, including an unseen planet called Vulcan, but relativity did the job perfectly. In 1916, Einstein predicted that relativistic effects would cause the apparent positions of stars to change during an eclipse, as the sun bent the distant stars' rays. Robots and Babies Both Use Curiosity to Learn Humans have a drive to eat. We have a drive to drink. We have a drive to reproduce. Curiosity is no different, says George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. Our insatiable drive to learn—to invent, explore, and study ceaselessly—“deserves to have the same status as those other drives.” What’s curious about curiosity, though, is that it doesn’t seem to be tied to any specific reward.

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation 10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation by Terry Heick For the Google Generation, information isn’t scarce, and knowing has the illusion of only being a search away. I’ve written before about how Google impacts the way students think. This post is less about students, and more about how planning resources like standards and curriculum maps might respond accordingly. Curriculum maps are helpful little documents that standardize learning.

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