background preloader

The de Bono Group - Six Thinking Hats

The de Bono Group - Six Thinking Hats
Used with well-defined and explicit Return On Investment success in corporations worldwide, Six Thinking Hats is a simple, effective parallel thinking process that helps people be more productive, focused, and mindfully involved. A powerful tool set, which once learned can be applied immediately! You and your team members can learn how to separate thinking into six clear functions and roles. Each thinking role is identified with a colored symbolic "thinking hat." By mentally wearing and switching "hats," you can easily focus or redirect thoughts, the conversation, or the meeting. Using Six Thinking Hats®, you and your team will learn how to use a disciplined process which will... Significant Applications for the Parallel Thinking Process of Six Thinking Hats Introducing The de Bono Group Leader's Package Two highly engaging de Bono Group resources bundled together for optimized team learning Read more about Six Hats Online Here Click here for Return on Investment results!

http://www.debonogroup.com/six_thinking_hats.php

Related:  Edward de Bono - Six Thinking Hats & CoRTCritical Thinking & World DebatesNew Learning Environments 22.6.2016Six Hatsméthodes pédagogiques

Edward de Bono Edward de Bono (born 19 May 1933) is a Maltese physician, author, inventor and consultant. He originated the term lateral thinking,[citation needed] wrote the book Six Thinking Hats and is a proponent of the deliberate teaching of thinking as a subject in schools. Biography[edit] Critical Thinking Class: Grading Policies The Goal of the Portfolio is to Amass Evidence of Critical Thinking Ability "Evidence" is something that makes something else "evident". The key question is "What specifically does your writing make evident?" When you write sentences that can be interpreted in many different ways, you make evident that you are thinking in a vague way. When you do not give concrete examples and illustrations to make your point clear, you make evident that you do not know how to clarify your thought.

6 Thinking Hats - Edward de Bono The Six Thinking Hats technique (6TH) of Edward de Bono is a model that can be used for exploring different perspectives towards a complex situation or challenge. Seeing things in various ways is often a good idea in strategy formation or complex decision-making processes. The 6TH technique is designed to help individuals deliberately adopt a variety of perspectives on a subject that may be very different from the one that they might most naturally assume. In wearing a particular thinking hat, people play roles, or "as if" themselves into a particular perspective. For instance, one could play the devil’s advocate, even if only for the sake of generating discussion. The purpose of devil’s advocacy is to deliberately challenge an idea: be critical, look for what is wrong with it.

Critical Thinking Course Description: Critical Thinking is an introductory course in the principles of good reasoning. It covers pretty much the same subject as what is usually taught in practical logic, informal reasoning or the study of argumentation. This means that the main focus of the course lies in arguments, their nature, their use and their import. In this regard, a course in Critical Thinking comes very close to the study of classical Logic as it pertains to our natural language. Gartner’s Software Hype Cycles for 2012 In a series of reports, Gartner has evaluated the maturity, adoption and future direction of more than 1,900 technologies and trends for 2012. The technologies are viewed from the perspective of the hype cycle consisting of the following five phases: Technology Trigger, Peak of Inflated Expectations, Trough of Disillusionment, Slope of Enlightenment, and Plateau of Productivity. The Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle 2012 contains a number of new technologies which have entered the stage, including Big Data, Internet of Things, and In-Memory Computing, while others are at the peak, such as HTML5, Hybrid Cloud Computing, Social Analytics: The hype cycles help evaluating various technologies, to see their maturity and suitability for investment.

Parallel thinking Parallel thinking is a term coined and implemented by Edward de Bono.[1][2] Parallel thinking is described as a constructive alternative to "adversarial thinking", debate and in general the approach the GG3 (Greek gang of three) has been known to advocate.[3] In general parallel thinking is a further development of the well known lateral thinking processes, focusing even more on explorations—looking for what can be rather than for what is. Definition[edit] Parallel thinking is defined as a thinking process where focus is split in specific directions.

The Path to Critical Thinking Few of us are effective critical thinkers—who has time? The good news, says Stever Robbins, is that this skill can be learned. by Stever Robbins Can you write a refresher on critical thinking? Pegasus Systems Thinking in Action At the Pegasus Systems Thinking in Action Conference this year, a cross-sector community represented by nearly 500 people from each continent gathered to connect, learn, and reflect in regards to the session theme: “Fueling New Cycles of Success.” We all know in our bones what it’s like to find inspiration from leading thinkers. We follow their books, talks, ideas – seeking to absorb their insights into our own, apply their provocations to our best intent and action. But to recently scribe for some of the people who are most influential to my own facilitation practice brought a kind of mental model and process high. This feeling, combined with a series of truly gut-reaching questions, leads me to share highlights here – so the word can spread and take root in as many concerned global citizens as possible. Here are some threads of particular relevance to the whole of our work:

Po (lateral thinking) A "po" is an idea which moves thinking forward to a new place from where new ideas or solutions may be found. The term was created by Edward de Bono as part of a lateral thinking technique to suggest forward movement, that is, making a statement and seeing where it leads to. It is an extraction from words such as hypothesis, suppose, possible and poetry, all of which indicate forward movement and contain the syllable "po." Po can be taken to refer to any of the following: provoking operation, provocative operation or provocation operation. Also, in ancient Polynesian and the Maori, the word "po" refers to the poporiginal chaotic state of formlessness, from which evolution occurred.

Decision 411 Course Outline 2005 Robert Nau Fuqua School of Business Duke University Tweet Effective Thinking Skills Course - The Edward de Bono online course in Thinking The Online de Bono Thinking Skills Course At last! A distributed on-line learning course designed by Edward de Bono. George E. Vaillant's: Aging Well: Surprising Guideposts to a Happier Life from the Landmark Harvard Study of Adult Development George E. Vaillant's "We all need models for how to live from retirement to past 80--with joy," writes George Vaillant, M.D., director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development.

School of Thinking The School of Thinking (SOT) was founded by Michael Hewitt-Gleeson and Edward de Bono in New York, United States, in 1979 to teach 'thinking' as a skill. Presently, SOT is a free, virtual school, based in Melbourne, Australia, that uses a daily series of free emailed lessons to teach speed thinking, creative thinking, positive thinking, lateral thinking, and new brain software which goes beyond 'critical thinking'. History[edit] SOT's initial mission was to get 'thinking' into schools as a school subject. Under Hewitt-Gleeson's direction, SOT instructors trained thousands of people around the United States, and installed thinking skills into school districts, corporations, and government organizations. Within five years, 'teaching thinking' in US schools had become, according to the New York Times, the biggest new trend in education.

Generalised problems kill startups It’s crazy how often I hear founders say ‘I think the problem we’re really solving is X’. Hang on a second… You ‘think’? The surprising thing is that if you forgot temporarily why you started your business, you’re not alone. Why it’s easy to forget the problem you’re solving As early-stage founders, it’s beaten into us that we need to deliver our elevator pitch as quickly as possible.

Related: