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ENFP Profile

ENFP Profile
Extraverted iNtuitive Feeling Perceiving by Marina Margaret Heiss Profile: ENFP Revision: 4.0 Date of Revision: 28 Feb 2011 [The following comes partially from the archetype, but mostly from my own dealings with ENFPs.] ENFPs are both "idea"-people and "people"-people, who see everyone and everything as part of a cosmic whole. They want to both help and to be liked and admired by other people, on both an individual and a humanitarian level. This is rarely a problem for the ENFP, as they are outgoing and warm, and genuinely like people. ENFPs often have strong, if sometimes surprising, values and viewpoints. ENFPs can be the warmest, kindest, and most sympathetic of mates; affectionate, demonstrative, and spontaneous. For some ENFPs, relationships can be seriously tested by their short attention spans and emotional needs. In the workplace, ENFPs are pleasant and friendly, and interact in a positive and creative manner with both their co-workers and the public. by Joe Butt Famous ENFPs: Dr.

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Careers for ENFP Personality Types Whether you're a young adult trying to find your place in the world, or a not-so-young adult trying to find out if you're moving along the right path, it's important to understand yourself and the personality traits which will impact your likeliness to succeed or fail at various careers. It's equally important to understand what is really important to you. When armed with an understanding of your strengths and weaknesses, and an awareness of what you truly value, you are in an excellent position to pick a career which you will find rewarding. ENFPs generally have the following traits: ENFPs are lucky in that they're good a quite a lot of different things. Overview of the Four Temperaments Temperament is a configuration of observable personality traits, such as habits of communication, patterns of action, and sets of characteristic attitudes, values, and talents. It also encompasses personal needs, the kinds of contributions that individuals make in the workplace, and the roles they play in society. Dr.

Keirsey Temperament Sorter Heading text[edit] The Keirsey Temperament Sorter (KTS) is a self-assessed personality questionnaire designed to help people better understand themselves and others. It was first introduced in the book Please Understand Me. It is one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world, and its user base consists of major employers including Bank of America, Allstate, the U.S. Career Quiz "Interests" describe the types of activities that you are drawn to; these will need to be present in a job or career that you are considering if you are to stay motivated. It is important to note that interest in an activity does not necessarily indicate skill. Yellow — People with yellow Interests like job responsibilities that include organizing and systematizing, and professions that are detail-oriented, predictable, and objective. People with yellow Interests enjoy activities that include: ordering, numbering, scheduling, systematizing, preserving, maintaining, measuring, specifying details, and archiving, which often lead to work in research, banking, accounting, systems analysis, tax law, finance, government work, and engineering. Green — People with green Interests like job responsibilities and occupations that involve persuasion, sales, promotions, and group or personal contact.

Champion (role variant) The Champion Idealist is one of the 16 role variants of the Keirsey Temperament Sorter,[1] a self-assessed personality questionnaire designed to help people better understand themselves. David Keirsey originally described the Champion role variant; however, a brief summary of the personality types described by Isabel Myers contributed to its development. Champions correlate with the Myers-Briggs type ENFP.[2] Portrait of the Idealist Champion (ENFP) Like the other Idealists, Champions are rather rare, say three or four percent of the population, but even more than the others they consider intense emotional experiences as being vital to a full life. Champions have a wide range and variety of emotions, and a great passion for novelty. They see life as an exciting drama, pregnant with possibilities for both good and evil, and they want to experience all the meaningful events and fascinating people in the world.

ENFP This article is about the Myers-Briggs personality type. For the Socionics ENFp, see Intuitive Ethical Extrovert. ENFP (Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perception) is an abbreviation used in the publications of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to refer to one of sixteen personality types.[1] The MBTI assessment was developed from the work of prominent psychiatrist Carl G. Jung in his book Psychological Types. Jung proposed a psychological typology based on the theories of cognitive functions that he developed through his clinical observations. The MBTI instrument[edit] Personality Test Resource Center Nowadays, personality tests have become quite common place as people want to discover more about themselves. By taking these tests, people can find out some important facets of their personality. Often these tests not only describe a personality but allow testers to learn the advantages and disadvantages of their personality type.

ENFP Relationships ENFPs take their relationships very seriously, but also approach them with a childlike enthusiasm and energy. They seek and demand authenticity and depth in their personal relationships, and will put forth a lot of effort into making things work out. They are warm, considerate, affirming, nurturing, and highly invested in the health of the relationship. They have excellent interpersonal skills, and are able to inspire and motivate others to be the best that they can be.

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