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Yarn bombing

Yarn bombing
Yarn bombing, yarnbombing, yarn storming, guerrilla knitting, kniffiti, urban knitting or graffiti knitting is a type of graffiti or street art that employs colourful displays of knitted or crocheted yarn or fibre rather than paint or chalk. Method and motivation[edit] While yarn installations – called yarn bombs or yarnstorms – may last for years, they are considered non-permanent, and, unlike other forms of graffiti, can be easily removed if necessary. Nonetheless, the practice is still technically illegal in some jurisdictions, though it is not often prosecuted vigorously.[1] While other forms of graffiti may be expressive, decorative, territorial, socio-political commentary, advertising or vandalism, yarn bombing was initially almost exclusively about reclaiming and personalizing sterile or cold public places.[2] It has since developed with groups graffiti knitting and crocheting worldwide, each with their own agendas and public graffiti knitting projects being run.[3] History[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yarn_bombing

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How To Yarn Bomb I get asked all the time "How do you yarn bomb exactly?" So here's a How To guide on yarn bombing. This is just from my personal experience. 5 Most Amazing Yarn Bombings You Don't Want to Miss Nothing brings a smile to my face like a yarn bombing. Whether it’s a huge installation on a bridge or just a small one like a doorknob cozy, seeing everyday objects covered in yarn brightens my day instantly. Fiber artists like Olek and Magda Sayeg are practically yarn craft-household names in the world of yarn bombing, organizing some of the most famous fiber installations we know. Now, yarn bombings are now becoming so large in size that it often takes the cooperation of fiber artists and large organizations to stage the entire installation.

Pompoms! I saw some pompoms on Pinterest the other day and it reminded me to make some with my boys (and my niece and nephew). They all l-o-v-e-d it! I had fun too. Reminded me of making them with my Mum when I was little! Pompom Inspiration – – – – – – – – – – – – – – // Neon pompoms as wall decorations. // Pompom jewellery (the third from bottom is my favourite…love those colours). // Pompom garland from etsy seller Depeapa. // Miniature pompoms made with forks. How to Yarn Bomb: Tips & Tricks from a Pro Have you seen trees and statues covered with brightly covered yarn in your neighborhood and wondered how it was done? Or have you seen photos of knitted or crocheted statues online and dreamed of becoming your town’s next yarn bomber? If so, you’ve come to the right place. Here, we’ll reveal how to yarn bomb in five steps.

architectural academic crochet This is one of my recent projects. Just to show that I can crochet something else, not just hyperbolic planes. Since there is a crochet in the title of my blog I should write about it too. Especially because recently one of my friends complained that my blog is too academic, too mathematical, and too serious. I think he meant too boring, just was polite not to say that to me directly. May be he is right, I am too serious. KNITS FOR LIFE We make, install, maintain, and remove the vast majority of our work and almost always get permission to install. We have never “gotten in trouble” or been asked to remove a new yarnbomb. Our yarnbombs do not damage flora and fauna. Yarnbombing is not a waste of time.

Biotech Learning Hub Consumer demand and new technology drives wool innovation Changing consumer needs and lifestyles are driving demand for new fabrics that are lightweight, comfortable and easy to care for. The increasing range and functionality of synthetic fabrics has been meeting this consumer need and presenting a challenge for wool researchers. Developments in spinning technology and fabric construction together with growing understanding of wool’s structure have helped researchers respond to the challenge, and now a variety of innovative wool textiles are meeting consumer demand. Developments include Natural Easy Care (NEC) wool and a new stab and flame-resistant fabric. Two ways of making woolly pompoms When I was younger and a family member or friend was expecting a baby, my Mum would encourage me and my brother to make pompoms for the new baby. So it seemed only right that I would make a few for my own twins who are due any day! I have found 2 ways of making pompoms, which I will call the ‘traditional’ way and the ‘quick’ way. Let’s start with the traditional way. For this you will need: Wool (any type, in 1 or more colours)Card (I used a piece of a cardboard box)Scissors

2410 × 2297 - artsyforager.wordpress.com 2874 × 1829 - hallscreekfestival.com 611 × 404 - content.time.com How to Weave on a Cardboard Loom June 25th, 2008 Email 1322 users recommend Weaving like this can be the basis for so many projects: place mats, coasters, bags, hats—use your imagination. All photos by Diane Gilleland Yarn Bombing Wikipedia describes yarn bombing as "a type of graffiti or street art that employs colorful displays of knitted or crocheted cloth rather than paint or chalk." Knitted, crocheted or woven pieces are sewn around inanimate public objects such as bike racks, light poles, telephone boxes and abandoned buses. The purpose is to bring some beauty and wonder into otherwise drab and everyday surroundings. Wool processing: fleece to fabric Fleece Different breeds of sheep produce different types of wool, from very fine merino wool to much coarser crossbred wool. Coarser diameter wool is more suitable for heavy apparel and carpets, while finer wool is used for high-quality apparel. The key properties that determine the use of wool are its diameter and the crimp. The crimp or the waviness of the fibre is different from breed to breed.

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