background preloader

The Human Brain Atlas at Michigan State University

The Human Brain Atlas at Michigan State University
Keith D. Sudheimer, Brian M. Winn, Garrett M. Kerndt, Jay M. Shoaps, Kristina K. Davis, Archibald J. Radiology Department, Communications Technology Laboratory, and College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University; National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology A note concerning stained sections: In this atlas you can view MRI sections through a living human brain as well as corresponding sections stained for cell bodies or for nerve fibers. Introduction and methods Acknowledgments

https://www.msu.edu/~brains/brains/human/index.html

Related:  Med ResourcesThe Brain

The Human Brain · Atlas of the Human Brain · Brain in Stereotaxic Space Brain – The Atlas of the Human Brain in Stereotaxic Space A short introduction in to the Atlas of the Human Brain and the Brain used throughout for the research on this site. To take a more systematical approach to the use of the provided material both on the DVD from the "Atlas of the Human Brain" and the applications you can find on this website the following explanatory steps might help. Figure 1: The Brain used for research in the "Atlas of the Human Brain" and which are used for the main applications is from a 24-year-old male from the Vogt collection in Düsseldorf. Further details about The Brain.

Nuts and Bolts the neuron A single neuron may be connected to as many as 200 000 others, via junctions called synapses. They form an extensive network throughout the body, and can transmit signals at speeds of 100 metres per second. This enables animals to process and respond to events rapidly, for example by carrying sensory information from the ears to the brain, then instructions for movement from the brain to the leg muscles Within a neuron, signals are transmitted by a change of membrane voltage – a variation in the difference in electrical charge between the inside and outside of the cell.

Digital Anatomist Interactive Atlases Structural Informatics GroupDepartment of Biological StructureUniversity of Washington Seattle, Washington, USA Atlases Content: 2-D and 3-D views of the brain from cadaver sections, MRI scans, and computer reconstructions.Author: John W. SundstenInstitution: Digital Anatomist Project, Dept. Biological Structure, University of Washington, Seattle. Brain Structures and Their Functions The nervous system is your body's decision and communication center. The central nervous system (CNS) is made of the brain and the spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is made of nerves. Together they control every part of your daily life, from breathing and blinking to helping you memorize facts for a test. Nerves reach from your brain to your face, ears, eyes, nose, and spinal cord... and from the spinal cord to the rest of your body.

Breath Sounds Lung sounds Breath Sounds Auscultation of lungs help determine the airway and alveolar integrity, ventilation and presence of abnormality. There are two normal breath sounds. Human brain The human brain has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but has a more developed cortex than any other. Large animals such as whales and elephants have larger brains in absolute terms, but when measured using the encephalization quotient which compensates for body size, the human brain is almost twice as large as the brain of the bottlenose dolphin, and three times as large as the brain of a chimpanzee. Much of the expansion comes from the part of the brain called the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal lobes, which are associated with executive functions such as self-control, planning, reasoning, and abstract thought. The portion of the cerebral cortex devoted to vision is also greatly enlarged in humans.

Brain Dissector Medulla oblongata, Pons and Thalamus MRI Coronal plane with annotations Brain interior with auto-hiding annotations Learning Materials Explores factors associated with disease emergence & re-emergence & considers the human activities that can increase... see more Explores factors associated with disease emergence & re-emergence & considers the human activities that can increase or decrease the likelihood of outbreaks of infectious diseases. Students play the role of epidemiologists looking for clues to solve the case of a mystery disease, watch simulations of herd immunity & the impact of vaccination programs, & assign limited funds to three proposals submitted to address a major infectious disease. (NIH) The target audience is grades 9-12. Material Type: Online Course Author: NIH Office of Science Education, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Date Added: Jun 21, 2004 Date Modified: Apr 14, 2014

Neuron Conversations: How Brain Cells Communicate Nerve impulses involve the opening and closing of ion channels. These are selectively permeable, water-filled molecular tunnels that pass through the cell membrane and allow ions — electrically charged atoms — or small molecules to enter or leave the cell. The flow of ions creates an electrical current that produces tiny voltage changes across the neuron’s cell membrane. The ability of a neuron to generate an electrical impulse depends on a difference in charge between the inside and outside of the cell. When a nerve impulse begins, a dramatic reversal in the electrical potential occurs on the cell’s membrane, as the neuron switches from an internal negative charge to a positive charge state. The change, called an action potential, then passes along the axon’s membrane at speeds up to several hundred miles per hour.

Albany Medical College: License & Software Download Albany Medical College Virtual Brain ModelCopyright © 2009 Albany Medical College. All rights reserved. The Albany Medical College Virtual Brain Model is made available for educational, non-commercial use, at no charge, as a public service by Albany Medical College. By downloading the AMC VBM, you are agreeing to the following terms: You are permitted to download the Albany Medical College Virtual Brain Model solely for your own personal use as an educational (non-commercial) tool. You will not remove or obscure copyright notices from the software, images, image captures, printouts, or documentation.

Related: