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Middle Ages, Dynamic Culture of the Middle Ages

Middle Ages, Dynamic Culture of the Middle Ages
The European High Middle Ages, which lasted from about 1050 to 1300, evoke for many people romantic images of knights in shining armor, magnificent castles, and glorious cathedrals. And to many people, the word medieval (Latin medium aevum; "middle age") wrongly suggests a cultural intermission between the classical period of the Greek and Roman civilizations and the Renaissance. On the contrary, the High Middle Ages was a dynamic period that shaped European identity and development, stimulated in part by Europe’s interactions with other cultures in Eurasia and the Mediterranean. Many of the basic social and political patterns and institutions later associated with European history were formed during this era. Clear political boundaries and cultural identities emerged in the British Isles, France, Germany, Italy, eastern Europe, Iberia, and Scandinavia. Economic Expansion and the Emergence of Towns Social Diversity Political Centralization and the Development of Government by Consent

http://history-world.org/dynamic_culture_of_medieval_euro.htm

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The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Middle Ages: Review: Summary The Middle Ages designates the time span from the collapse of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance and Reformation, and the adjective "medieval" refers to whatever was made, written, or thought during the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages was a period of enormous historical, social, and linguistic change, despite the continuity of the Roman Catholic Church. In literary terms, the period can be divided into the Anglo-Saxon period (c. 450-1066), the Anglo-Norman period (1066- c. 1200), and the period of Middle English literature (thirteenth and fourteenth centuries). Linguistic and cultural changes in Britain were accelerated by the Norman Conquest in 1066, when words from French began to enter the English vocabulary. Awareness of a uniquely English literature did not actually exist before the late fourteenth century.

Medieval History Timeline Medieval History Timeline 1066 - 1485 Timeline Facts and interesting information about the lives and events of Medieval History,specifically, the Medieval History Timeline Medieval History TimelineMedieval Times encompass one of the most exciting and bloodthirsty periods in English and European History. Writings: Tracing the theme of love through the arts of the later Middle Ages The later Middle Ages in Europe (1150-1400) is also called Gothic Awakening, when Medieval towns and cities gained freedom from Feudal obligation. The Gothic era brought by itself new styles of architecture, music, literature, and art. Both secular and religious love themes can be traced in this era.

Ethnic and Religious Groups in Medieval Poland - Medieval Studies The best general overview of the composition of the Polish society and its transformations in the Middle Ages is offered by Ihnatowicz, et al. 1988. The studies of Kłoczowski 1998 and Kłoczowski 2000 present the history of Polish Christianity and analyze the relations between the Catholic and the Orthodox churches, as well as their attitude toward non-Christian groups. A comprehensive analysis of various ethnic and religious minorities in medieval Poland is presented in Drabina 1989, supplemented by selected sources in Polish translation from Drabina 1994. Two recent studies, Samsonowicz 1993 and Janeczek 2003, offer general reflections on the functioning of ethnic minorities in late medieval Poland. Medieval Introduction By about 1050, the invasions had run their course: the Moslems were in retreat; the Vikings and Hungarians had adopted Christianity and so became participants in western civilization. In the tenth century, the three-field system of crop rotation became popular, horses (more efficient than oxen) and iron plows were used, all resulting in surplus food and a better standard of living (Rosenwein 93). By 1000 we've got metal shoes for the horses and oxen to increase their work-lives, tandem harnesses for pulling with the shoulders instead of the neck.

Charlemagne - Facts & Summary According to Einhard, Charlemagne was in good health until the final four years of his life, when he often suffered from fevers and acquired a limp. However, as the biographer notes, “Even at this time…he followed his own counsel rather than the advice of the doctors, whom he very nearly hated, because they advised him to give up roasted meat, which he loved, and to restrict himself to boiled meat instead.” In 813, Charlemagne crowned his son Louis the Pious (778-840), king of Aquitaine, as co-emperor. Louis became sole emperor when Charlemagne died in January 814, ending his reign of more than four decades. At the time of his death, his empire encompassed much of Western Europe. Charlemagne was buried at the cathedral in Aachen.

Medieval History, Castles MedievalPlus.com The Middle Ages is a period in European history which, along with its adjective ‘Medieval’, was first referred to by italian scholars and academics of the late fifteenth century. They were basically stating that the society in which they now lived was significantly more civilized and advanced in many ways, than that which had existed during the previous thousand years. This may have been true within certain elite sections of Italian society which had begun to emulate the art and philosophy of ancient Greece, but generally in Italy and Europe overall no all-pervading change had occurred.

The Middle Ages A king (or lord) ruled large areas of land. To protect his land from invasion, the king gave parts of it to local lords, who were called vassals. In return, his vassals promised to fight to defend the king's land.

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