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How pop art influenced fashion

How pop art influenced fashion
Creative industries typically need each other to survive - art feeds on music, music feeds on art, fashion feeds on both and advertising eats everything it can get its mouth around. The bond between fashion and art is currently as strong as ever as evidenced everywhere from Prada's Spring/Summer 2014 commission of six graffiti artists, Bottega Veneta's work with Ryan McGinley and the modern-art-museum-worth of Louis Vuitton collaborations with artists like Yayoi Kusama to Takashi Murakami and Richard Prince. This commercially fruitful partnership goes back to the first half of the 20th Century, when Salvador Dali placed a giant-sized lobster on a white Elsa Schiapparelli dinner dress. Speaking to Wayne Tunnicliffe, the charismatic curator of Sydney's Pop to Popism exhibition, he explains that the relationship has been intensifying ever since. Pop artists didn't only use fashion in their work they also used fashion designers. Yves Saint Laurent by Andy Warhol, 1974

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How Machine Vision Is About to Change the Fashion World In the 2006 film The Devil Wears Prada, the notorious fashion editor Miranda Priestly sizes up people at a glance by analyzing their clothes, who designed them, and what year they date from. Priestly’s character is famously inspired by Anna Wintour, the long standing editor-in-chief of Vogue, herself a style icon. –> But if a human can recognize and date fashion styles with little more than a glance, why not a machine?

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Mirror Scans Your Face And Prints The Perfect Makeup Panasonic has built a device to help people find the ideal cosmetics for their skin Panasonic also happens to be a big beauty brand in Japan. With premium hairdryers, battery-powered face masks, steamers for the face and other stuff already in the market, it’s not just about home appliances for the company anymore. And as a nod to this newfound niche, it has built a smart mirror with a printer that is unlike anything we’ve seen before.

Art Architect and digital artist Laurent Rosset creates sweeping photographic landscapes the seem to curl upward into infinity like an enormous wave that obliterates the sky. Rosset uses much of his own photography to create each image and enjoys discovering how even slight manipulations can vastly change the composition or meaning of a photograph. You can see more of his work on Instagram, and if you liked this also check out Aydin Buyuktas. (via Colossal Submissions)

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how does social media shape our perception of beauty? A male friend of mine who considers himself "big on Tinder" claims the winning five photo formula is this: front-on photo, side profile photo, photo showing teeth, body photo and height photo, involving a casual scale prop such as Kylie Minogue. If you're not better looking on Tinder than in real life, you have failed. It's the most gratifying, terrifying, humanity-destroying platform ever created.

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