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European Migration: 08/09/2015, Behind the News

European Migration: 08/09/2015, Behind the News
We're taking you to Europe where right now more than a hundred thousand asylum seekers are arriving each month. Here's Emma to take a closer look at this issue and some of the kids that are caught up in it. EMMA DAVIS, REPORTER: This sight is becoming very common in a lot of European countries. Tens of thousands of asylum seekers, travelling across borders, desperate for a new home. 15-year old Jehad is one of them. He used to live in Syria before he left his home behind. JEHAD: I remember my cousin, my grandmother, grandfather and all my people from my family. Since January, more than 300 thousand people have risked their lives trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to get to Europe. They travel to the coast and many pay people smugglers to take them across the sea. JEHAD: It was scary, it was so scary. Jehad says the boat he travelled on was basically just an inflatable raft. JEHAD: It's a small boat. JEHAD: We need clothes. JEHAD: Because I love studying.

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4305291.htm

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CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF W.H AUDEN'S 'REFUGEE BLUES’ Put in simple terms, this is a poem about the plight of a specific group of refugees displaced and arriving in a country that is generally hostile to their situation, even if well-meaning. Written in 1939, Auden focuses on the German Jews arriving in the UK at that time, though the poem has taken in a timeless quality due to the commonality of its subject. Indeed, it is not until stanza 8 that Auden identifies his Refugees. Possibly he is trying to show the reluctance of the persecuted to identify themselves for fear of further persecution, possibly he is allowing the narrator –we assume a husband – to present the key ideas of his poem without the idea of Jewishness in some way getting in the way of a universal message. He has chosen the title Refugee Blues to link to the protest and subculture of the enslaved Blacks, who developed this musical form in the Southern USA, and has written a poem in which the rhythm and rhyme scheme (AAB) reflects the musical style. Jonathan Peel SGS 2012

Refugee Blues by W H Auden Say this city has ten million souls, Some are living in mansions, some are living in holes: Yet there's no place for us, my dear, yet there's no place for us. Once we had a country and we thought it fair, Look in the atlas and you'll find it there: We cannot go there now, my dear, we cannot go there now. In the village churchyard there grows an old yew, Every spring it blossoms anew: Old passports can't do that, my dear, old passports can't do that. The consul banged the table and said, "If you've got no passport you're officially dead": But we are still alive, my dear, but we are still alive. Went to a committee; they offered me a chair; Asked me politely to return next year: But where shall we go to-day, my dear, but where shall we go to-day? Came to a public meeting; the speaker got up and said; "If we let them in, they will steal our daily bread": He was talking of you and me, my dear, he was talking of you and me.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 5 Great YouTube Channels for Learning English September 2 , 2015 Youtube is undoubtedly a great source of educational content to use in class with your students. It also hosts tons of channels that provide instructional tutorials specifically tailored for different learning needs and styles. We have already reviewed some of these channels in previous posts and today we are sharing with you some of our favourite YouTube channels for learning English. You can use them with your ELL/ESL/EFL students to enhance their grasp of English in different areas: speaking, writing, listening , vocabulary, and grammar. 1- BBC Learning English ‘Do you want to learn how to speak English?

The Case of The Lower Case Letter by Jack Delany She breezed into my office one cold September morning. I'd been enjoying a hot cup of Starbuck's finest and surfing the web for local news. The famous lexical semanticist Professor Edgar Nettleston had been found dead, a gunshot wound to the head. The police verdict was suicide. She held out an elegant hand as she floated towards me and I glimpsed a wedding band with a stone the size of a peanut M&M. "I'm Edith Nettleston."

Kids in Detention: 20/10/2015, Behind the News Did you know that about 200 kids are currently being held by the Australian Government in immigration detention centres? Some are held in Australia, others on an island a long way from here called Nauru. But lately there's been growing concern for their welfare. A group of doctors from the Royal Children's Hospital in Victoria recently announced that they're now refusing to return kids sent to them for treatment from an immigration detention centre. But why? Why people are fleeing Syria: a brief, simple explanation With the refugee crisis worsening as many Syrians attempt to flee to Europe, many people may find themselves wondering just how the war in that country got so bad, and why so many are fleeing now. Here, then, is a very brief history of the war, written so that anyone can understand it: Syria is a relatively new country: Its borders were constructed by European powers in the 1920s, mashing together several ethnic and religious groups. Since late 1970, a family from one of those smaller groups — the Assads, who are Shia Alawites — have ruled the country in a brutal dictatorship. Bashar al-Assad has been in power since 2000.

The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day World Refugee Day is coming-up in two days. Here is how it described at the official site: “The United Nations General Assembly designated June 20 as World Refugee Day to recognize and celebrate the contribution of refugees throughout the world. Since then, World Refugee Day has become an annual commemoration marked by a variety of events in over a hundred countries. year’s World Refugee Day theme is “Real People, Real Needs”.

Where did English come from? - Claire Bowern There are two other TED-Ed lessons related to this topic: How languages evolve and How did English evolve? (a lesson that fills in some of the details that we omit here due to the fact that the focus of this lesson was further in the past). There is still a great deal of debate about Indo-European, most importantly about the location of the homeland. To read more about this debate, there are classic books by Mallory and Renfrew, as well more recent works by Anthony. Then, read these articles by Bouckaert et al. At the same site, watch this movie that shows one hypothesis about how Indo-European languages expanded.

Träna mera – länktips Links to improve your skills in English Vocabulary Vocabulary for learners of English Help is Coming: how I chose a forgotten Crowded House song to help Syrian refugees I have two singles of the song Go West. It doesn’t matter which one I play. Either will reduce me to tears, but only one is intended to have that effect. The version that gave Village People a hit in 1979 was intended to be no more or less than a song about the American dream. With words written and sung by Victor Willis (the one who dressed as a naval officer), Go West transcended its lyrical intentions. You can't cure a disease by medicating its symptoms – same goes for the refugee crisis Last updated: September 3, 2015 You can't cure a disease by medicating its symptoms – same goes for the refugee crisis Södertälje, Sweden, early this morning; it’s dark, cold, and rainy. We are standing outside an office, drinking coffee.

Refugees welcome Now playing Today's refugee crisis is the biggest since World War II, and it's growing. When this talk was given, 50 million people had been forcefully displaced from their homes by conflict and war; now, a year later, the number is 60 million. There were 3 million Syrian refugees in 2014; now there are 4 million.

Related:  Migration