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Strategies to Build Intrinsic Motivation

Strategies to Build Intrinsic Motivation
"The fox leapt high to grasp the grapes, but the delicious-looking fruit remained just out of reach of his snapping jaws. After a few attempts the fox gave up and said to himself, 'These grapes are sour, and if I had some I would not eat them.' The fox changes his attitude to fit his behavior." - Aesop’s Fables There is a general misconception that our beliefs are the cause of our actions. Often it is the other way around. Just like the fox, people will tell themselves a story to justify their actions. Punishment, Rewards, and Commitment The issue with classroom management policies in most institutions is that it operates on a carrot-and-stick model. The goal of self-persuasion is to create cognitive dissonance in the mind of the one being persuaded. Punishment In 1965, Jonathan Freedman conducted a study in which he presented preschoolers with an attractive, desired, "Forbidden Toy." Weeks later, Freedman pulled the students out of class one by one and had them do a drawing test. Rewards

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/classroom-self-persuasion-david-palank

Related:  Teaching StrategiesTeaching ToolsMetacognition

Keeping Up with New Tools There are hundreds and hundreds of web-based tools available! There seem to be a dozen or more new tools online every day! Here are some of the newest ones that I'm exploring (from my Pinterest boards):Donna BaumbachWebTools-New 2 Me! 7 Best Practices for Giving Student Feedback Part of being an educator is having the skills to make hard concepts easier to understand, and the ability to make any student feel accomplished no matter how much they’re struggling. It’s all part of giving great feedback. Proper feedback should enable and inspire. It should make someone feel good about where they are, and get them excited about where they can go.

Metacognition by Nancy Chick, CFT Assistant Director Thinking about One’s Thinking | Putting Metacognition into Practice Thinking about One’s Thinking Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking. Best Applications For Annotating Websites I’m always on the look-out for web tools that can mimc a key instructional strategy I use with students in the classroom — having them use post-it notes to annotate books or articles so they can demonstrate their use of reading strategies (asking questions, making connections, etc.). I thought it would a good subject for another “The Best…” list. In order to make this list, it had to be available free-of-charge, be accessible to English Language Learners, and not require any downloads of any kind. Here are my choices for The Best Applications For Annotating Websites (not in order of preference): A.nnotate is the newest addition to this list. Instead of describing A.nnotate in detail here, though, I’m going to suggest you read a very thorough description of it — with screenshots — at The Make Use Of blog.

What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning Via MindShift The following excerpt is from “Authentic Learning in the Digital Age: Engaging Students Through Inquiry,” by Larissa Pahomov. This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “Making Reflection Relevant.” 5 Highly Effective Teaching Practices I remember how, as a new teacher, I would attend a professional development and feel inundated with new strategies. (I wanted to get back to the classroom and try them all!) After the magic of that day wore off, I reflected on the many strategies and would often think, "Lots of great stuff, but I'm not sure it's worth the time it would take to implement it all." We teachers are always looking to innovate, so, yes, it's essential that we try new things to add to our pedagogical bag of tricks.

EDU 609 - Antioch University Seattle School Library Certification Program Helen Adams, a former Wisconsin school librarian and technology coordinator, is currently an onlineinstructor in the School Library Media Endorsement Program of Antioch University-Seattle. Helen's published works include numerous article in professional journals. Additionally, she has written Protecting Intellectual Freedom and Privacy in Your School Library (Libraries Unlimited 2013), Ensuring Intellectual Freedom and Access to Information in the School Library Media Program (Libraries Unlimited 2008), Privacy in the 21st Century: Issues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries (co-author, Libraries Unlimited 2005), and is a contributor to the forthcoming The Many Faces in School Library Leadership , 2nd edition (Libraries Unlimited 2017). A former AASL President in 2001-2002, she is currently a member of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee, the ALA Privacy Subcommittee, the Knowledge Quest Advisory Board, the ALA American Libraries Advisory Board, and the ALA Nominating Committee.

27 Teacher Actions That Help Promote Valid Assessment Data Via TeachThought There is often talk about assessment–its forms, frequency, and the integration of gleaned data to revise planned instruction. Formative versus assessment, rigor, and the evasive nature of understanding are also areas for exploration. But rarely is there discussion about the kinds of things teachers can do–literal actions and concrete strategies–to help streamline the assessment process, and hopefully produce purer results you can trust. In the infographic below, Mia MacMeekin offers her now familiar “27 ways” format, this time teacher actions that are conducive to more valid assessment results–and thus data you can trust. Coupled with our 10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds Or Less, that’s several dozen simple formative assessment forms and strategies to add to your teacher tool set.

Teaching Metacognition to Improve Student Learning Metacognition can be a word that gets in the way of students’ understanding that this “thinking about thinking” is really about their awareness of themselves as learners. Most students don’t spend much time thinking about learning generally or how they learn specifically. In order to become independent, self-directed learners, they need to be able to “orchestrate” their learning. Standard 2 - Literacy and Reading - School Library Media Services The reading theme I chose is Black History. This theme will be taught starting the week of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day through Black History Month, February, allowing students to learn how famous Black Americans contributed throughout history.

Why Facebook is Blue: The Science of Colors in Marketing via Buffer Why is Facebook blue? According to The New Yorker, the reason is simple. It’s because Mark Zuckerberg is red-green colorblind. Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" We all have students that just want to "get it right." We all have students that constantly seek the attention of the teacher. "Did I get this right?" "Is this what you want?" Now while it's certainly a good thing to affirm students in their learning, many times we want students to be creative with their learning. We allow them to own their learning and create assessment products where they can show us what they know in new and inventive ways.

40 STEAM Apps and Websites We’re dubbing 2017 the Summer of Creativity and we want you to join in. What better way to do that than with some new STEAM apps and websites to explore? We’ve found 20 apps and 20 websites that you can use to integrate the arts everywhere. So whether you’re using Arts Integration, STEAM, PBL or any other maker-centered approach, these resources will make that process so much easier. Want to download these as a single PDF for reference later? 10 Apps for Learners Who Struggle with Reading and/or Writing Despite the growing use of multimedia in classrooms, schools remain primarily text oriented. This is a major problem for significant numbers of learners who struggle with text. No matter how capable they may be in other respects, these students are not “academically” oriented in the ways that tend to matter most in the classroom.

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