background preloader

Why people are fleeing Syria: a brief, simple explanation

Why people are fleeing Syria: a brief, simple explanation
With the refugee crisis worsening as many Syrians attempt to flee to Europe, many people may find themselves wondering just how the war in that country got so bad, and why so many are fleeing now. Here, then, is a very brief history of the war, written so that anyone can understand it: Syria is a relatively new country: Its borders were constructed by European powers in the 1920s, mashing together several ethnic and religious groups. Since late 1970, a family from one of those smaller groups — the Assads, who are Shia Alawites — have ruled the country in a brutal dictatorship. Bashar al-Assad has been in power since 2000. This regime appeared stable, but when Arab Spring protests began in 2011, it turned out not to be. On March 18, Syrian security forces opened fire on peaceful protestors in the southern city of Deraa, killing three. Perhaps inevitably, Syrians took up arms to defend themselves. It worked. By 2014, Syria was divided between government, rebel, ISIS, and Kurdish forces.

http://www.vox.com/2015/9/4/9261971/syria-refugee-war

Related:  flyktingkatastrofenRefugeesRefugeesGlobal Economy

The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day World Refugee Day is coming-up in two days. Here is how it described at the official site: “The United Nations General Assembly designated June 20 as World Refugee Day to recognize and celebrate the contribution of refugees throughout the world. Since then, World Refugee Day has become an annual commemoration marked by a variety of events in over a hundred countries. year’s World Refugee Day theme is “Real People, Real Needs”. Despite the efforts of many, the needs of refugees worldwide are far from being met.

The Refugee Project The Refugee Project is a narrative, temporal map of refugee migrations since 1975. We’ve used UN data to visualize refugee volumes over time and added a layer of historical content to help explain the events that caused some of the largest refugee movements of the last four decades. Under international law, the United Nations is responsible for protecting asylum seekers around the world. Through the offices of the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and a separate agency for Palestinian refugees (UNRWA), the UN counts and tracks millions of displaced people as part of its larger task of safeguarding their lives and rights.

Market Red Alert I have never done anything like this before. Ever since I started The Economic Collapse Blog in late 2009, I have never issued any kind of “red alert” for any specific period of time. As an attorney, I was trained to be level-headed and to only come to conclusions that were warranted by the evidence. So this is not something that I am doing lightly. You can't cure a disease by medicating its symptoms – same goes for the refugee crisis Last updated: September 3, 2015 You can't cure a disease by medicating its symptoms – same goes for the refugee crisis Södertälje, Sweden, early this morning; it’s dark, cold, and rainy. We are standing outside an office, drinking coffee. Two of us are smokers, which is why we are outdoors.

Ten things you didn’t know about refugees With 45.2 million displaced by violence, persecution or rights abuses, the number of refugees is higher than at any time since 1994, says UNHCR Today is World Refugee Day - and the latest statistics from the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR) show world refugee numbers are higher than at any time since 1994. As U.N. refugee chief Antonio Gutteres put it at a recent news conference: “Each time you blink, another person is forced to flee.” UNHCR’s annual report shows that some 45.2 million people were uprooted by violence, persecution or rights abuses as of the end of last year, but the numbers also challenge some common misconceptions about refugees and displacement.

World needs to stabilise population and cut consumption, says Royal Society World population will reach 9 billion by 2050. Photograph: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images World population needs to be stabilised quickly and high consumption in rich countries rapidly reduced to avoid "a downward spiral of economic and environmental ills", warns a major report from the Royal Society. Contraception must be offered to all women who want it and consumption cut to reduce inequality, says the study published on Thursday, which was chaired by Nobel prize-winning biologist Sir John Sulston. The assessment of humanity's prospects in the next 100 years, which has taken 21 months to complete, argues strongly that to achieve long and healthy lives for all 9 billion people expected to be living in 2050, the twin issues of population and consumption must be pushed to the top of political and economic agendas.

Refugees welcome Now playing Today's refugee crisis is the biggest since World War II, and it's growing. When this talk was given, 50 million people had been forcefully displaced from their homes by conflict and war; now, a year later, the number is 60 million. There were 3 million Syrian refugees in 2014; now there are 4 million. Inside this overwhelming crisis are the individual human stories — of care, growth and family, in the face of lost education, lost home, lost future.

Refugee or migrant Refugee or Migrant - word choice matters. © UNHCR GENEVA, July 11 (UNHCR) – With more than 65 million people forcibly displaced globally and boat crossings of the Mediterranean still regularly in the headlines, the terms 'refugee' and 'migrant' are frequently used interchangeably in media and public discourse. But is there a difference between the two, and does it matter? Yes, there is a difference, and it does matter. Economic contribution The direct value of the UK fashion industry to the UK economy is estimated at £26bn, up from £21bn in 2009, according to data from Oxford Economics, the consultancy, published by the British Fashion Council. This represents an increase of 22 per cent in nominal terms between 2009 and 2014. If the indirect support for supply chain industries and the induced spending of employees' wages are added in, the total contribution from the UK fashion industry is £46bn.Oxford Economics estimates that fashion’s wider contribution to the UK economy in influencing spending in other industries has risen from £37bn in 2009 to over £46bn in 2014 - a 23 per cent increase.The UK fashion industry is estimated to support 797,000 jobs (down from 816,000 in 2009 which reflects an increase in productivity in the sector). Fashion is the largest employer of all the UK's creative industries. Source: The British Fashion Industry and London Fashion Week Facts & Figures, BFC, Feb 2016. Economic Value

Welcome (2009 film) Welcome is a 2009 French film directed by Philippe Lioret. It stars Vincent Lindon and features Firat Ayverdi and Derya Ayverdi in their inaugural roles. The film was released on 11 March 2009 in France. The director wanted to highlight the plight of illegal immigrants living in Calais, France, and their plans to reach the United Kingdom meeting activists and associations trying to help the refugees.[1]

World’s Refugee Crisis [charts] One out of every 122 people alive today is someone who, at some point, was forced to leave his or her home. If you totaled up all these people, they would have a greater population than all of South Africa — nearly as many people who live in all of the United Kingdom. This is the stunning scope of the world's refugee crisis, which the United Nations expects will leave at least 60 million people displaced by the end of 2015. This is the highest level of displacement that the international body has ever recorded. The global refugee total at this time last year was 19.5 million.

The Problem with Society isn't Greed Greed Is a Symptom of a Deep Need Going Unfulfilled A lot of people reacted to my comment on Facebook the other day that greed is more a symptom than a cause of our current system, with all its inequities. I’m asked, What is the cause of greed? First I’ll say what I think greed is: Greed is the insatiable desire for that which one doesn’t really need, or in amounts beyond one’s needs.

Related: