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Courtly Love - World History in Context

Courtly Love - World History in Context
One of the most commonly held, and perhaps most misunderstood, modern notions about the Middle Ages is the type of romantic or erotic love believed to have been practiced in the period, popularly referred to as "courtly love." Courtly love is a cluster of related ideas and sensibilities characterizing an extreme expression of romantic passion that was demonstrated frequently by characters in medieval literature, especially in courtly romances and the love lyrics of the French troubadours and the German minnesingers. The term "courtly love" was never used in medieval texts, although medieval authors and poets did use the term fin'amors (refined love) to describe the extremes of emotion experienced, often suffered, by male protagonists in romances and by the lover singing love songs to his beloved in the lyric tradition. But what exactly was the late medieval European phenomenon known popularly as "courtly love"? the knights and ladies at the aristocratic courts. A. E. W. J.

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Courtly Love in the Middle Ages: Definition, Characteristics & Rules Explore this lesson on courtly love, an essential concept to understanding relationships between men and women in medieval literature. Learn the definition of courtly love, its connection with chivalry, the rules of courtly love, and discover examples of works that feature courtly love from the middle ages. Explore our library of over 10,000 lessons Click "next lesson" whenever you finish a lesson and quiz. Got It You now have full access to our lessons and courses.

Code of Chivalry Facts and interesting information about the life and times of theMedieval Knights of England - Code of Chivalry Code of Chivalry There was not an authentic Code of Chivalry as such. The Code of Chivalry was a moral system which went beyond rules of combat and introduced the concept of Chivalrous conduct - qualities idealized by the Medieval knights such as bravery, courtesy, honor and great gallantry toward women. The Codes of chivalry also incorporated the notion of courtly love.

The Main Characteristics of Courtly Love Courtly Love Main characteristics: 1. The poet sings the joy of his love, which is an exalted feeling. 2. He praises and extols the woman he loves, who is superior and can be approached only with veneration and restraint. 3. Love is a passion that affects the lover's body and soul and tends to unbalance him (love-sickness). Points 1-3 are sort of general and could be made about love poetry in many different cultures.

Thomas Becket Help support New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download or CD-ROM. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99... Martyr, Archbishop of Canterbury, born at London, 21 December, 1118 (?) Ebola virus: 9 things to know about the killer disease "It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90% of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities," it says. There is also no vaccination against it. Of Ebola's five subtypes, the Zaire strain -- the first to be identified -- is considered the most deadly.

Medieval History, Castles MedievalPlus.com The Middle Ages is a period in European history which, along with its adjective ‘Medieval’, was first referred to by italian scholars and academics of the late fifteenth century. They were basically stating that the society in which they now lived was significantly more civilized and advanced in many ways, than that which had existed during the previous thousand years. This may have been true within certain elite sections of Italian society which had begun to emulate the art and philosophy of ancient Greece, but generally in Italy and Europe overall no all-pervading change had occurred. Historians since that time have, however, used the terms 'middle ages' and medieval as a convenient way to refer to that general period in European history. It has been regarded as extending approximately from the end of the fifth century AD, when the control of the Roman Empire had ended, until the end of the fifteenth century AD, when the modern world was considered to have begun.

The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) [Chaucer Biography] GEOFFREY CHAUCER, English poet. The name Chaucer, a French form of the Latin calcearius, a shoemaker, is found in London and the eastern counties as early as the second half of the 13th century. Some of the London Chaucers lived in Cordwainer Street, in the shoemakers' quarter; several of them, however, were vintners, and among others the poet's father John, and probably also his grandfather Robert. Legal pleadings inform us that in December 1324 John Chaucer was not much over twelve years old, and that he was still unmarried in 1328, the year which used to be considered that of Geoffrey's birth. New Theories Link Black Death to Ebola-Like Virus Between 1347 and 1352, a mysterious disease ravaged Europe, killing an estimated 25 million people -- 30 percent to 50 percent of the population. At the time, people said the disease was caused by a peculiar conjunction of the planets, by a miasma stirred up by earthquakes in Central Asia or by a conspiracy of Jews to undermine Christendom. Many called it the wrath of God and expected the end of the world. Although the pandemic now called the Black Death lasted no more than six years, according to most medieval historians, the disease behind it erupted periodically in different parts of Europe for the next three centuries, leaving millions more dead in its wake. Then it largely vanished from the continent, but questions over its origins remained.

Geography and ethnic geography of the Balkans to 1500 Twenty-Five Lectures on Modern Balkan History Lecture 1: Geography and ethnic geography of the Balkans to 1500 One can't understand the Balkans without understanding its ethnic groups, and one can't understand the ethnic groups and their history without knowing the influence of the region's geography. Even the geographic extent of the "Balkan" region is a matter of controversy. Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London sometime between 1340 and 1344 to John Chaucer and Agnes Copton. John Chaucer was an affluent wine merchant and deputy to the king’s butler. Through his father’s connections, Geoffrey held several positions early in his life, serving as a noblewoman’s page, a courtier, a diplomat, a civil servant, and a collector of scrap metal. His early life and education were not strictly documented although it can be surmised from his works that he could read French, Latin, and Italian. In 1359, Chaucer joined the English army’s invasion of France during the Hundred Years’ War and was taken prisoner; King Edward III of England paid his ransom in 1360. In 1366, Chaucer married Philipa de Roet, who was a lady-in-waiting to Edward III’s wife.

Was Ebola Behind the Black Death? Controversial new research suggests that contrary to the history books, the "Black Death" that devastated medieval Europe was not the bubonic plague, but rather an Ebola-like virus. History books have long taught the Black Death, which wiped out a quarter of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, was caused by bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas that lived on black rats. But new research in England suggests the killer was actually an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person.

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