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Courtly Love - World History in Context

Courtly Love - World History in Context
One of the most commonly held, and perhaps most misunderstood, modern notions about the Middle Ages is the type of romantic or erotic love believed to have been practiced in the period, popularly referred to as "courtly love." Courtly love is a cluster of related ideas and sensibilities characterizing an extreme expression of romantic passion that was demonstrated frequently by characters in medieval literature, especially in courtly romances and the love lyrics of the French troubadours and the German minnesingers. The term "courtly love" was never used in medieval texts, although medieval authors and poets did use the term fin'amors (refined love) to describe the extremes of emotion experienced, often suffered, by male protagonists in romances and by the lover singing love songs to his beloved in the lyric tradition. But what exactly was the late medieval European phenomenon known popularly as "courtly love"? the knights and ladies at the aristocratic courts. A. E. W. J. Related:  Medieval RenaissanceMedievalMedieval Period

Courtly Love in the Middle Ages: Definition, Characteristics & Rules Explore this lesson on courtly love, an essential concept to understanding relationships between men and women in medieval literature. Learn the definition of courtly love, its connection with chivalry, the rules of courtly love, and discover examples of works that feature courtly love from the middle ages. Explore our library of over 10,000 lessons Click "next lesson" whenever you finish a lesson and quiz. Got It You now have full access to our lessons and courses. You're 25% of the way through this course! Way to go! Congratulations on earning a badge for watching 10 videos but you've only scratched the surface. You've just earned a badge for watching 50 different lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 20 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 50 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 100 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 250 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 500 minutes of lessons.

The Main Characteristics of Courtly Love Courtly Love Main characteristics: 1. The poet sings the joy of his love, which is an exalted feeling. 2. He praises and extols the woman he loves, who is superior and can be approached only with veneration and restraint. 3. Love is a passion that affects the lover's body and soul and tends to unbalance him (love-sickness). Courtly Love Back to Women Writers of the Middle Ages Homepage Back to Domestic Life

Code of Chivalry Facts and interesting information about the life and times of theMedieval Knights of England - Code of Chivalry Code of Chivalry There was not an authentic Code of Chivalry as such. The Code of Chivalry was a moral system which went beyond rules of combat and introduced the concept of Chivalrous conduct - qualities idealized by the Medieval knights such as bravery, courtesy, honor and great gallantry toward women. The Codes of chivalry also incorporated the notion of courtly love. ChivalryCourtly LoveKnights of the Round Table The Knight's Code of Chivalry A knight was expected to have not only the strength and skills to face combat in the violent era of the Middle Ages but was also expected to temper this aggressive side with a chivalrous side to his nature. The Code of Chivalry and the legends of King ArthurThe virtues taken as a Knight's Code of Chivalry was publicised in the poems, ballads and literary works of Medieval authors.

Rules of Courtly Love Rules of Courtly Love The following set of rules is based on the De Amore of Andreas Capellanus, as adapted in Appendix 1 of Ann S. Haskell's A Middle English Anthology (Detroit: Wayne State UP, 1985). To find out more about Andreas Capellanus, click here. 1. Marriage should not be a deterrent to love. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. For a good translation, see Capellanus, Andreas, Andreas Capellanus on Love, translated P.G. For further information, see A.

Thomas Becket Help support New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download or CD-ROM. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99... Martyr, Archbishop of Canterbury, born at London, 21 December, 1118 (?) To look upon he was slim of growth and pale of hue, with dark hair, a long nose, and a straightly featured face. Theobald recognized his capacity, made use of him in many delicate negotiations, and, after allowing him to go for a year to study civil and canon law at Bologna and Auxerre, ordained him deacon in 1154, after bestowing upon him several preferments, the most important of which was the Archdeaconry of Canterbury (see Radford, "Thomas of London", p. 53). It was just at this period that King Stephen died and the young monarch Henry II became unquestioned master of the kingdom. In 1153 Thomas acted as justice itinerant in three counties. Then followed a period of unworthy and vindictive persecution. Sources

Medieval History, Castles MedievalPlus.com The Middle Ages is a period in European history which, along with its adjective ‘Medieval’, was first referred to by italian scholars and academics of the late fifteenth century. They were basically stating that the society in which they now lived was significantly more civilized and advanced in many ways, than that which had existed during the previous thousand years. This may have been true within certain elite sections of Italian society which had begun to emulate the art and philosophy of ancient Greece, but generally in Italy and Europe overall no all-pervading change had occurred. Historians since that time have, however, used the terms 'middle ages' and medieval as a convenient way to refer to that general period in European history. It has been regarded as extending approximately from the end of the fifth century AD, when the control of the Roman Empire had ended, until the end of the fifteenth century AD, when the modern world was considered to have begun.

Ebola virus: 9 things to know about the killer disease "It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90% of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities," it says. There is also no vaccination against it. Of Ebola's five subtypes, the Zaire strain -- the first to be identified -- is considered the most deadly. What is Ebola? The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which according to the U.S. The virus is named after the Ebola River in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire), where one of the first outbreaks occurred in 1976. The WHO says there are five different strains of the virus -- named after the areas they originated in. These are the Bundibugyo -- an area of Uganda where the virus was discovered in 2007 -- Sudan and Zaire sub-types. There has been a solitary case of Ivory Coast Ebola. Finally, Reston Ebola is named after Reston in the U.S. state of Virginia, where this fifth strain of the Ebola virus was identified in monkeys imported from the Philippines. What are Ebola's symptoms?

Middle Ages, Dynamic Culture of the Middle Ages The European High Middle Ages, which lasted from about 1050 to 1300, evoke for many people romantic images of knights in shining armor, magnificent castles, and glorious cathedrals. And to many people, the word medieval (Latin medium aevum; "middle age") wrongly suggests a cultural intermission between the classical period of the Greek and Roman civilizations and the Renaissance. On the contrary, the High Middle Ages was a dynamic period that shaped European identity and development, stimulated in part by Europe’s interactions with other cultures in Eurasia and the Mediterranean. Economic Expansion and the Emergence of Towns Territorial expansion, innovations in agriculture, and the development of cities and trade brought rapid economic change to medieval Europe. Migration and expansion of frontiers stretched the boundaries of European countries in the Mediterranean, eastern Europe, and Iberia. Social Diversity Political Centralization and the Development of Government by Consent

History - Thomas Becket History - Ancient History in depth: Peoples of Britain New Theories Link Black Death to Ebola-Like Virus Between 1347 and 1352, a mysterious disease ravaged Europe, killing an estimated 25 million people -- 30 percent to 50 percent of the population. At the time, people said the disease was caused by a peculiar conjunction of the planets, by a miasma stirred up by earthquakes in Central Asia or by a conspiracy of Jews to undermine Christendom. Many called it the wrath of God and expected the end of the world. Although the pandemic now called the Black Death lasted no more than six years, according to most medieval historians, the disease behind it erupted periodically in different parts of Europe for the next three centuries, leaving millions more dead in its wake. Then it largely vanished from the continent, but questions over its origins remained. In 1894, two scientists, Dr. Dr. The debate stems largely from the difficulty of identifying a disease based on the few medieval descriptions of the Black Death that have survived. The authors, Dr. Dr. But Dr.

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