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History - Thomas Becket

History - Thomas Becket

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/becket_thomas.shtml

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The Canterbury Tales Looking back, it’s difficult to remember just when the idea came to create The Canterbury Tales, but it must have been around 1387. The work was never finished, but what was written amounted to about 17,000 lines, written for the most part in heroic couplets. In The Canterbury Tales, a party of twenty-nine pilgrims gathers at the Tabard Inn in Southwark in preparation for their pilgrimage to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. The host of the inn proposes to go along on the pilgrimage as guide, and as a way to pass the time he suggests that the pilgrims each tell two stories on the way out and on the way back. That would mean a total of 116 tales all together. The pilgrim with the best stories would have a free dinner once all are returned to Southwark.

Thomas Becket Help support New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download or CD-ROM. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99... Martyr, Archbishop of Canterbury, born at London, 21 December, 1118 (?) Geoffrey Chaucer - Author, Poet English poet Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the unfinished work, The Canterbury Tales. It is considered one of the greatest poetic works in English. Synopsis Poet Geoffrey Chaucer was born circa 1340 in London, England. In 1357 he became a public servant to Countess Elizabeth of Ulster and continued in that capacity with the British court throughout his lifetime.

The Main Characteristics of Courtly Love Courtly Love Main characteristics: 1. The poet sings the joy of his love, which is an exalted feeling. 2. He praises and extols the woman he loves, who is superior and can be approached only with veneration and restraint. 3. Love is a passion that affects the lover's body and soul and tends to unbalance him (love-sickness). Points 1-3 are sort of general and could be made about love poetry in many different cultures.

Courtly Love - World History in Context One of the most commonly held, and perhaps most misunderstood, modern notions about the Middle Ages is the type of romantic or erotic love believed to have been practiced in the period, popularly referred to as "courtly love." Courtly love is a cluster of related ideas and sensibilities characterizing an extreme expression of romantic passion that was demonstrated frequently by characters in medieval literature, especially in courtly romances and the love lyrics of the French troubadours and the German minnesingers. The term "courtly love" was never used in medieval texts, although medieval authors and poets did use the term fin'amors (refined love) to describe the extremes of emotion experienced, often suffered, by male protagonists in romances and by the lover singing love songs to his beloved in the lyric tradition.

Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer is the most famous writer of Medieval England. Geoffrey Chaucer immortalised Medieval England in the ‘Canterbury Tales’ – the stories of various people gravitating to Canterbury Cathedral at the end of a pilgrimage. Geoffrey Chaucer has to go down as one of Britain’s finest writers. No one knows the exact date of Chaucer’s birth. Chaucer was probably born sometime between 1340 and 1345. Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer (born 1340/44, died 1400) is remembered as the author of The Canterbury Tales, which ranks as one of the greatest epic works of world literature. Chaucer made a crucial contribution to English literature in using English at a time when much court poetry was still written in Anglo-Norman or Latin. Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London. He was the son of a prosperous wine merchant and deputy to the king's butler, and his wife Agnes.

Courtly Love in the Middle Ages: Definition, Characteristics & Rules Explore this lesson on courtly love, an essential concept to understanding relationships between men and women in medieval literature. Learn the definition of courtly love, its connection with chivalry, the rules of courtly love, and discover examples of works that feature courtly love from the middle ages. Explore our library of over 10,000 lessons Click "next lesson" whenever you finish a lesson and quiz. Got It You now have full access to our lessons and courses.

Medical Astrology and Astrological Medicine by Peter Morrell Astrology as applied to medicine has very ancient roots, for example in India, China and Egypt, but it reached its fullest flowering in Europe in the late medieval and early modern periods, c1450-1700. The influence of astrology also entered European medicine from the Arab countries. Basically it is no exaggeration to say that astrology dominated everything during that period and thus many systems of knowledge depended upon it, were symbiotic with it, or made reference to it in their worldview. In the case of medicine, astrologers assigned signs of the zodiac to rule over parts of the body, planets to rule over organs and systems, and planets to rule over diseases and drugs. Thus the whole system is one of observation and interpretation based upon a complex system of given Rulerships.

historical era Alternative titles: le moyen âge; media tempora; medium aevium Middle Ages, Britannica Classic: The Medieval MindEncyclopædia Britannica, Inc.the period in European history from the collapse of Roman civilization in the 5th century ce to the period of the Renaissance (variously interpreted as beginning in the 13th, 14th, or 15th century, depending on the region of Europe and on other factors). The term and its conventional meaning were introduced by Italian humanists with invidious intent; the humanists were engaged in a revival of Classical learning and culture, and the notion of a thousand-year period of darkness and ignorance separating them from the ancient Greek and Roman world served to highlight the humanists’ own work and ideals. In a ... (100 of 906 words)

The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) [Chaucer Biography] GEOFFREY CHAUCER, English poet. The name Chaucer, a French form of the Latin calcearius, a shoemaker, is found in London and the eastern counties as early as the second half of the 13th century. Some of the London Chaucers lived in Cordwainer Street, in the shoemakers' quarter; several of them, however, were vintners, and among others the poet's father John, and probably also his grandfather Robert. Legal pleadings inform us that in December 1324 John Chaucer was not much over twelve years old, and that he was still unmarried in 1328, the year which used to be considered that of Geoffrey's birth. Medieval Witchcraft Facts and interesting information about Medieval Life,specifically, Medieval Witchcraft Medieval Witchcraft - White Witches, Wise Women and Cunning FolkDuring the early and middle Medieval era, up to the Renaissance period, the wisdom of the 'Wise women' or 'Cunning Folk' - the White Witches - were seen as helpful, if not invaluable, members of their communities. Their knowledge of the healing properties of various plants and herbs were often passed down through the generations. Their role was to provide help for people in need. Medieval Witchcraft - Black WitchesThe White witches were clearly distinguished from the 'Black' witches. The 'Black' witches were seen as those who practised the secret arts of Medieval witchcraft in order to do physical or practical harm to others.

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