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Geoffrey Chaucer - Author, Poet

Geoffrey Chaucer - Author, Poet
English poet Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the unfinished work, The Canterbury Tales. It is considered one of the greatest poetic works in English. Synopsis Poet Geoffrey Chaucer was born circa 1340 in London, England. In 1357 he became a public servant to Countess Elizabeth of Ulster and continued in that capacity with the British court throughout his lifetime. The Canterbury Tales became his best known and most acclaimed work. Early Life Poet Geoffrey Chaucer was born circa 1340, most likely at his parents’ house on Thames Street in London, England. Geoffrey Chaucer is believed to have attended the St. In 1357, Chaucer became a public servant to Countess Elizabeth of Ulster, the Duke of Clarence’s wife, for which he was paid a small stipend—enough to pay for his food and clothing. In 1366, Chaucer married Philippa Roet, the daughter of Sir Payne Roet, and the marriage conveniently helped further Chaucer’s career in the English court. Public Service Major Works Later Life Death

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Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London sometime between 1340 and 1344 to John Chaucer and Agnes Copton. John Chaucer was an affluent wine merchant and deputy to the king’s butler. Through his father’s connections, Geoffrey held several positions early in his life, serving as a noblewoman’s page, a courtier, a diplomat, a civil servant, and a collector of scrap metal. Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer (born 1340/44, died 1400) is remembered as the author of The Canterbury Tales, which ranks as one of the greatest epic works of world literature. Chaucer made a crucial contribution to English literature in using English at a time when much court poetry was still written in Anglo-Norman or Latin. Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London. He was the son of a prosperous wine merchant and deputy to the king's butler, and his wife Agnes.

Medieval Period - Where Did it All Begin? The term "medieval" comes from the Latin meaning "middle age." The term medieval (originally spelled mediaeval) wasn't introduced into English until the 19th century, a time when there was heightened interest in the art, history and though of the Middle Ages. There is some disagreement about when the Medieval Period started, whether it began in the 3rd, 4th, or 5th century AD. Most scholars associate the beginning of the period with the collapse of the Roman empire, which began in 410 AD. Scholars similarly disagree about when the period ends, whether they place the end at the start of the 15th century (with the rise of the Renaissance Period), or in 1453 (when Turkish forces captured Constantinople). Much of the early literature of this period consists of sermons, prayers, lives of saints, and homilies.

Pilgrimage to Canterbury Soon after the death of Thomas Becket, Pope Alexander canonised him and the murdered priest was elevated to sainthood. Becket's shrine at Canterbury now became the most important place in the country for pilgrims to visit. When Becket was killed, local people apparently managed to obtain pieces of cloth soaked in his blood. Rumours soon spread that, when touched by this cloth, people were cured of blindness, epilepsy and leprosy. It was not long before the monks at Canterbury Priory were selling small glass bottles of Becket's blood to visitors. WHAT IS PILGRIMAGE? « RE:quest Why would a Christian decide to go on a pilgrimage? Are there any places in the world that you would love to visit? Take a moment to think about why. Perhaps you chose somewhere that is associated with someone special – for example, the town or country your grandparents were born, or where a hero of yours lives.

Medieval History, Castles MedievalPlus.com The Middle Ages is a period in European history which, along with its adjective ‘Medieval’, was first referred to by italian scholars and academics of the late fifteenth century. They were basically stating that the society in which they now lived was significantly more civilized and advanced in many ways, than that which had existed during the previous thousand years.

The Canterbury Tales Looking back, it’s difficult to remember just when the idea came to create The Canterbury Tales, but it must have been around 1387. The work was never finished, but what was written amounted to about 17,000 lines, written for the most part in heroic couplets. In The Canterbury Tales, a party of twenty-nine pilgrims gathers at the Tabard Inn in Southwark in preparation for their pilgrimage to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. The host of the inn proposes to go along on the pilgrimage as guide, and as a way to pass the time he suggests that the pilgrims each tell two stories on the way out and on the way back. That would mean a total of 116 tales all together. The pilgrim with the best stories would have a free dinner once all are returned to Southwark.

The Main Characteristics of Courtly Love Courtly Love Main characteristics: 1. The poet sings the joy of his love, which is an exalted feeling. 2. He praises and extols the woman he loves, who is superior and can be approached only with veneration and restraint. 3. Love is a passion that affects the lover's body and soul and tends to unbalance him (love-sickness). Points 1-3 are sort of general and could be made about love poetry in many different cultures. What gives medieval "courtly love" its peculiar character is the following: 4.

The Canterbury Tales (Literature) Are we there yet? I know a shortcut! My saddle chafes. If I tell you a story, will you all shut up? Geoffrey Chaucer Biography - life, death, wife, school, young, book, information, born, house, marriage Born: c. 1345 London, England Died: October 1400 London, England English poet, author, and courtier Called the father of English poetry, Geoffrey Chaucer is ranked as one of the greatest poets of the late Middle Ages (C. E. 476 c.–1500). He was admired for his philosophy as well as for his poetic talents. Code of Chivalry Facts and interesting information about the life and times of theMedieval Knights of England - Code of Chivalry Code of Chivalry There was not an authentic Code of Chivalry as such. The Code of Chivalry was a moral system which went beyond rules of combat and introduced the concept of Chivalrous conduct - qualities idealized by the Medieval knights such as bravery, courtesy, honor and great gallantry toward women. The Codes of chivalry also incorporated the notion of courtly love. The Code of Chivalry was the honor code of the knight.

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