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Anglo-Saxon literature: Prose

Anglo-Saxon literature: Prose
Old English literary prose dates from the latter part of the Anglo-Saxon period. Prose was written in Latin before the reign of King Alfred (reigned 871–99), who worked to revitalize English culture after the devastating Danish invasions ended. As hardly anyone could read Latin, Alfred translated or had translated the most important Latin texts. He also encouraged writing in the vernacular. Didactic, devotional, and informative prose was written, and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, probably begun in Alfred's time as an historical record, continued for over three centuries. Two preeminent Old English prose writers were Ælfric, Abbot of Eynsham, and his contemporary Wulfstan, archbishop of York. A great deal of Latin prose and poetry was written during the Anglo-Saxon period. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. See more Encyclopedia articles on: English Literature to 1499

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Related:  Anglo- SaxonAnglo-SaxonsAnglo-Saxon PeriodAnglo-Saxon PeriodAnglo-Saxon

Edurete.org The most important formal aspects of Anglo-Saxons poetry were stress and allitteration. Each line was divided into two halves by a break or caesura and had four stresses; allitteration, which is a repetition of the same initial consonant sound, was used to link the two halves of a line. Anglo-Saxon poetry was extremely musical and the scop sang it accompanying himself on the harp. However, stress and allitteration were used to help the bard and the audience to memorize the poem. Other two important features of this kind of poetry are stock sentences or formulas and kennings. A stock sentence was a conventional expression, a commonplace, which was easy to remember because of its frequency; a kenning was a sort of riddle, such as :

ANGLO-SAXON PROSE In all language ,poetry made its appearance before prose ,and that was also true about Anglo-Saxon prose.Anglo-Saxon prose ,however ,fared much better than its counterpart -Anglo-Saxon poetry .In fact English literary prose came actually as late as nineteenth century under king Alfred's patronization.Anglo-Saxon poetry was archaic and a bit complicated ,but Anglo -Saxon prose was rather comparatively modern and simple. About Anglo-Saxon prose ,two specific features must be noted at the very beginning .In the very first place it has an essentially has national appearance .In the second place ,it is much closer to modern English than Anglo-Saxon poetry. Aeifric and Wulfstan are the most prominent prose writer of Anglo-Saxon age .Catholic Homilies is famous book of Aeifric.There are a few prose works Blickling Homilies ,a group of nineteenth sermon ,contained in a manuscript ,And some other homilies and fragmentary prose works.

Anglo-Saxon Culture Michael Delahoyde Washington State University History: When Rome was weakening early in the fifth century c.e., troops in the outlying regions, including the British Isles, were withdrawn. Walls, roads, and baths remain even now. They also left the native Celts and Celtic-speaking Britons somewhat christianized, and Picts and Scots in the north, but "political" power fell to unstable tribal units.

Anglosaxon Literature and Prose - Beaming Notes The Germanic forefathers of the English brought with them their own poetry but there is no evidence of them bringing any prose writings. The development of English prose wholly took place in England and was greatly facilitated by the introduction of Christianity. The early prose was utilitarian and we find its first traces in the collection of Laws such as the Laws of Ine and the opening pages of the chronicle which were kept in various monasteries such as Canterbury, Abingdon, Winchester, Worchester and Peterborough. An Examination of Anglo-Saxon lyric poetry by Colleen Klees The Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, era of England lasted from about 450-1066 A.D. The tribes from Germany that conquered Britain in the fifth century carried with them both the Old English language and a detailed poetic tradition. The tradition included alliteration, stressed and unstressed syllables, but more importantly, the poetry was usually mournful, reflecting on suffering and loss.1These sorrowful poems from the Anglo Saxon time period are mimetic to the Anglo-Saxons themselves; they reflect the often burdened and miserable lives and times of the people who created them. The Anglo-Saxon poems, “The Wanderer,” “The Seafarer,” and “The Wife’s Lament,” are three examples how literature is mimetic, for they capture the culture’s heroic beliefs of Fame and Fate, the culture’s societal structure, and religious struggle of the Old English time period: making the transition from paganism to Christianity. Anglo-Saxons set up Germanic kingdoms, each one ruled by a lord. 2 St.

ANGLO-SAXON POETRY Art imitates life so the mimetic theory stipulates. By examining the literature a culture produces, we may infer how they lived and what they valued. By examining these three short poems, we may infer that at least the following ideas / persons / beliefs meant a great deal to the Anglo-Saxons... the archetype of the journey on land and sea Anglo-Saxon literature: Poetry There are two types of Old English poetry: the heroic, the sources of which are pre-Christian Germanic myth, history, and custom; and the Christian. Although nearly all Old English poetry is preserved in only four manuscripts—indicating that what has survived is not necessarily the best or most representative—much of it is of high literary quality. Moreover, Old English heroic poetry is the earliest extant in all of Germanic literature.

Epic World History: Anglo-Saxon Culture The Anglo-Saxons were Germanic barbarians who invaded Britain and took over large parts of the island in the centuries following the withdrawal of the Roman Empire. They were initially less gentrified than other post-Roman barbarian groups such as the Franks or Ostrogoths because they had less contact with Mediterranean civilization. The Anglo-Saxons were originally pagan in religion. The main group, from northwestern Germany and Denmark, was divided into Angles, Saxons, and Jutes. German tribal affiliations were loose and the original invaders included people from other Germanic groups as well.

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