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Constructivism as a Paradigm for Teaching and Learning

Constructivism as a Paradigm for Teaching and Learning
What is constructivism? How does this theory differ from traditional ideas about teaching and learning? What does constructivism have to do with my classroom? Expert interview What is the history of constructivism, and how has it changed over time? What are some critical perspectives? What are the benefits of constructivism? What is constructivism? Constructivism is basically a theory -- based on observation and scientific study -- about how people learn. In the classroom, the constructivist view of learning can point towards a number of different teaching practices. Constructivist teachers encourage students to constantly assess how the activity is helping them gain understanding. You might look at it as a spiral. For example: Groups of students in a science class are discussing a problem in physics. Contrary to criticisms by some (conservative/traditional) educators, constructivism does not dismiss the active role of the teacher or the value of expert knowledge.

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Constructivist Learning Constructivist Learning by Dimitrios Thanasoulas, Greece Only by wrestling with the conditions of the problem at hand, seeking and finding his own solution (not in isolation but in correspondence with the teacher and other pupils) does one learn. Andragogy Knowles' theory of andragogy is an attempt to develop a theory specifically for adult learning. Knowles emphasizes that adults are self-directed and expect to take responsibility for decisions. Adult learning programs must accommodate this fundamental aspect. Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains: The Cognitive Domain Bloom's Taxonomy was created in 1956 under the leadership of educational psychologist Dr Benjamin Bloom in order to promote higher forms of thinking in education, such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning). It is most often used when designing educational, training, and learning processes. The Three Domains of Learning The committee identified three domains of educational activities or learning (Bloom, et al. 1956):

Constructivism Learning Theory How to Study Help students learn to study well. We offer a number of great resources. View Study Skills Graphic Organizers Constructivist Learning Theory Teaching with the Constructivist Learning Theory What is the best method of teaching to use? One of the first things a teacher must do when considering how to teach students is to acknowledge that each student does not learn in the same way. This means that if the teacher chooses just one style of teaching (direct instruction, collaborative learning, inquiry learning, etc.), the students will not be maximizing their learning potential. Obviously, a teacher can not reach every student on the same level during one lesson, but implementing a variety of learning styles throughout the course allows all the students will have the chance to learn in at least one way that matches their learning style. Much of the material used to educate students at grade levels beyond primary school is largely text and lecture based, which have significant limitations.

Creating Products to Show and Share Learning My students produced a lot of media, including podcasts. Before my students scripted and recorded a podcast, they would listen to several sample episodes and critique them. We would make a list of what was really good about the episode and what could be improved. ORID It was developed by the Institute of Cultural Affairs (ICA) in Canada and involves a facilitator asking people four levels of questioning with each level building on previous levels. It's based on the theory that people need to be cognisant of the actual data and deal with their emotional responses to the topic in order to undertake better analysis and decision-making. ‘O’ stands for objective – the facts that the group knows

Instructional or Learning Design Constructivism is a learning theory, not an instructional approach, hence it can best be thought of as a way of "growing" or improving instruction. It is greatly influenced by Piagetian (1950) epistemology and Lev Vygotsky's (1978) Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) — knowledge (new connections) are products of the activities practiced in a social environment. Constructivists place the learner at the center of the equation; the idea is that the learner constructs knowledge rather than passively absorbing it. Constructivist Learning Design Paper Teachers and teacher educators make different meanings of constructivist learning theory. At a recent retreat with facilitators of learning communities for teachers who were studying in a Masters of Education program, we were talking about our common reading of The Case for Constructivist Classrooms (Brooks & Brooks, 1993). We asked the ten facilitators to answer this question, "What is constructivism?" The results were interesting because all of their definitions were quite different and reflected their own understanding of the term and the text. This was a clear demonstration that what we read does not produce a single meaning but that understanding is constructed by the readers who bring prior knowledge and experience to the text and make their own meaning as they interact with the author's words.

World Wide Web Access: Disability Discrimination Act Advisory Notes ver 4.0 (2010) World Wide Web Access:Disability Discrimination Act Advisory Notes Version 4.0 Australian Human Rights Commission October 2010 Copyright © Australian Human Rights CommissionReproduction with acknowledgment is permitted and encouraged. Writing in the Wilderness Without a Guide: How <i>Not</i> to Use Journals in the College Composition Classroom By: John Levine Publication: The Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2 Date: 2004 Summary: The proprietary value of a journal is lost on students who don't know what journals are all about. In this article, John Levine shares his struggle to direct his students toward meaningful journal writing. "In April 1992, a young man from a well-to-do East Coast family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mount McKinley.

Harvard Wants to Know: How Does the Act of Making Shape Kids’ Brains? Big Ideas Culture Design Thinking Teaching Strategies A group of Harvard researchers is teaming up with schools in Oakland, Calif. to explore how kids learn through making. Through an initiative called Project Zero, they’re investigating the theory that kids learn best when they’re actively engaged in designing and creating projects to explore concepts. Constructivism - Learning and Teaching Constructivism is a learning theory found in psychology which explains how people might acquire knowledge and learn. It therefore has direct application to education. The theory suggests that humans construct knowledge and meaning from their experiences. Constructivism is not a specific pedagogy. Piaget's theory of Constructivist learning has had wide ranging impact on learning theories and teaching methods in education and is an underlying theme of many education reform movements. Research support for constructivist teaching techniques has been mixed, with some research supporting these techniques and other research contradicting those results.

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