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Anglosaxon Literature and Prose - Beaming Notes

Anglosaxon Literature and Prose - Beaming Notes
The Germanic forefathers of the English brought with them their own poetry but there is no evidence of them bringing any prose writings. The development of English prose wholly took place in England and was greatly facilitated by the introduction of Christianity. The early prose was utilitarian and we find its first traces in the collection of Laws such as the Laws of Ine and the opening pages of the chronicle which were kept in various monasteries such as Canterbury, Abingdon, Winchester, Worchester and Peterborough. The prose that we find in these earliest writings does not have a proper form. Literary prose started developing from the 9th century under King Alfred who attempted to revive learning in his kingdom and it later flourished under prolific Anglo-Saxon writers such as Aelfric and Wulfstan. Alfred has been called the “Father of English prose” and with good reasons. Aelfric has been called the greatest English prose writer till the Elizabethan time. Related:  Anglo-Saxon PeriodAnglo-SaxonAnglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon literature: Prose Old English literary prose dates from the latter part of the Anglo-Saxon period. Prose was written in Latin before the reign of King Alfred (reigned 871–99), who worked to revitalize English culture after the devastating Danish invasions ended. As hardly anyone could read Latin, Alfred translated or had translated the most important Latin texts. He also encouraged writing in the vernacular. Didactic, devotional, and informative prose was written, and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, probably begun in Alfred's time as an historical record, continued for over three centuries. Two preeminent Old English prose writers were Ælfric, Abbot of Eynsham, and his contemporary Wulfstan, archbishop of York. A great deal of Latin prose and poetry was written during the Anglo-Saxon period. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. See more Encyclopedia articles on: English Literature to 1499

Anglo-Saxon literature: Poetry There are two types of Old English poetry: the heroic, the sources of which are pre-Christian Germanic myth, history, and custom; and the Christian. Although nearly all Old English poetry is preserved in only four manuscripts—indicating that what has survived is not necessarily the best or most representative—much of it is of high literary quality. Moreover, Old English heroic poetry is the earliest extant in all of Germanic literature. It is thus the nearest we can come to the oral pagan literature of Germanic culture, and is also of inestimable value as a source of knowledge about many aspects of Germanic society. The 7th-century work known as Widsith is one of the earliest Old English poems, and thus is of particular historic and linguistic interest. Beowulf, a complete epic, is the oldest surviving Germanic epic as well as the longest and most important poem in Old English. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. See more Encyclopedia articles on: English Literature to 1499

Alfred the Great: The Most Perfect Man in History? King Alfred of Wessex (r.871-99) is probably the best known of all Anglo-Saxon rulers, even if the first thing to come into many people’s minds in connection with him is something to do with burnt confectionery. The year 1999 saw the 1100th anniversary of his death on October 26th, 899, at the age of about 50. The occasion is being marked with conferences and exhibitions in Winchester, Southampton and London, but the scale of celebrations will be modest compared with those which commemorated his millenary, and culminated in the unveiling by Lord Rosebery of his statue in Winchester. Alfred’s reputation still stands high with historians, though few would now want to follow Edward Freeman in claiming him as ‘the most perfect character in history’ (The History of the Norman Conquest of England, 5 volumes, 1867-79). There can be no doubt that Alfred’s reign was significant, both for the direction of the country’s development and for the fortunes of his descendants. Anglo-Saxons!

Epic World History: Anglo-Saxon Culture The Anglo-Saxons were Germanic barbarians who invaded Britain and took over large parts of the island in the centuries following the withdrawal of the Roman Empire. They were initially less gentrified than other post-Roman barbarian groups such as the Franks or Ostrogoths because they had less contact with Mediterranean civilization. The Anglo-Saxons were originally pagan in religion. The main group, from northwestern Germany and Denmark, was divided into Angles, Saxons, and Jutes. Although some of the early Anglo-Saxon invaders had Celtic-influenced names, such as Cedric, the founder of the house of Wessex, the Anglo-Saxons had a pronounced awareness of them-selves as different from the peoples already inhabiting Britain. The early Anglo-Saxons highly valued courage and skill in battle, as reflected in the most significant surviving Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf. The Anglo-Saxons strongly valued familial ties—the kinless man was an object of pity.

Discribe the features of Anglo-Saxon Poetry in detail. - Homework Help The poetry of the Anglo-Saxons is defined by the following characteristics: 1. Anglo-Saxon poetry is written in blank verse. The term blank verse means that there is no end rhyme occurring from line to line. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Saxon Kings: House of Wessex Æthelwulf (839-58 AD) Æthelwulf was the son of Egbert and a sub-king of Kent. He assumed the throne of Wessex upon his father's death in 839. His reign is characterized by the usual Viking invasions and repulsions common to all English rulers of the time, but the making of war was not his chief claim to fame. Æthelwulf is remembered, however dimly, as a highly religious man who cared about the establishment and preservation of the church. He was also a wealthy man and controlled vast resources. He was an only child, but had fathered five sons, by his first wife, Osburga. Æthelwulf was a wise and capable ruler, whose vision made possible the beneficial reign of his youngest son, Alfred the Great. Æthelbald (858-60 AD) While his father, Æthelwulf, was on pilgrimage to Rome in 855, Æthelbald plotted with the Bishop of Sherbourne and the ealdorman of Somerset against him. Æthelwulf died in 858, and full control passed to Æthelbald. Æthelbert (860-66 AD) Æthelred (866-71 AD) Edmund I (940-46 AD)

The History of English - Old English (c. 500 - c.1100) About 400 Anglo-Saxon texts survive from this era, including many beautiful poems, telling tales of wild battles and heroic journeys. The oldest surviving text of Old English literature is “Cædmon's Hymn”, which was composed between 658 and 680, and the longest was the ongoing “Anglo-Saxon Chronicle”. But by far the best known is the long epic poem “Beowulf”. “Beowulf” may have been written any time between the 8th and the early 11th Century by an unknown author or authors, or, most likely, it was written in the 8th Century and then revised in the 10th or 11th Century. Old English was a very complex language, at least in comparison with modern English. Many of the most basic and common words in use in English today have their roots in Old English, including words like water, earth, house, food, drink, sleep, sing, night, strong, the, a, be, of, he, she, you, no, not, etc.

History - Ancient History in depth: The Anglo-Saxons The Anglo-Saxon Hero by Christopher Garcia In Anglo-Saxon culture and literature, to be a hero was to be a warrior. A hero had to be strong, intelligent, and courageous. In Beowulf, the Anglo-Saxon hero is well defined by the actions of Beowulf. Strength and physical appearance are essential to the Anglo-Saxon warrior. I resolved, when I set out on the sea, sat down in the sea-boat with my band of men, that I should altogether fulfill the will of your people or else fall in slaughter, fast in the foe's grasp. When Beowulf speaks these words, he shows his great courage, and displays the proper attitude of the Anglo-Saxon warrior. Beowulf also shows that a hero must be humble. Like Beowulf, Ibn Fadlan shows many honorable characteristics in The 13th Warrior. There are, however, some character traits that pertain more to today's heroes in the movie. The earth-walker of "The Wanderer" helps to further define the Anglo-Saxon warrior and hero.

5 Accomplishments of Julius Caesar Julius Caesar was a great Roman leader at the end of the Roman Republic. More on Julius Caesar below.... 5 Accomplishments of Julius Caesar Julius Caesar was a general, a statesman, a lawgiver, an orator, and historian. He never lost a war. Caesar fixed the calendar. Who Was Caesar? In case you're reading this list of accomplishments without a grounding, here's a quick overview of Julius Caesar. Although the word Caesar signifies the ruler of the Roman emperor, in the case of the first of the Caesars, it was just his name. (Gaius) Julius Caesar was born 3 days before the Ides of July, on July 13 in c. 100 B.C. In 44 B.C. conspirators claiming they feared Caesar was aiming to become king assassinated Caesar on the Ides of March.

Anglo-Saxons: a brief history Publication date: 13th January 2011 King Arthur as one of the Nine Worthies, detail from the 'Christian Heroes Tapestry' This period is traditionally known as the Dark Ages, mainly because written sources for the early years of Saxon invasion are scarce. It is a time of war, of the breaking up of Roman Britannia into several separate kingdoms, of religious conversion and, after the 790s, of continual battles against a new set of invaders: the Vikings. Climate change had an influence on the movement of these new invaders to Britain: in the centuries after 400 AD Europe's average temperature was 1°C warmer than we have today, and in Britain grapes could be grown as far north as Tyneside. At the same time melting polar ice caused more flooding in low areas, particularly in what is now Denmark, Holland and Belgium. A short history of the Anglo-Saxons in Britain Anglo-Saxon mercenaries had for many years fought in the Roman army in Britain, so they were not total strangers to the island. 1. 2.

Anglo-Saxon Poetry: Characteristics & Examples In this lesson, we will review the general history of Anglo-Saxon society and its era. Then, we will look closer at the characteristics of the literature, specifically the poetry, of that era. Explore our library of over 10,000 lessons Click "next lesson" whenever you finish a lesson and quiz. Got It You now have full access to our lessons and courses. You're 25% of the way through this course! Way to go! Congratulations on earning a badge for watching 10 videos but you've only scratched the surface. You've just earned a badge for watching 50 different lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 20 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 50 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 100 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 250 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 500 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 1000 minutes of lessons.

The Anglo-Saxon Influence on Romano-Britain: Research past and present Charlotte Russell University of Durham Abstract: The Romano-British to Anglo-Saxon transition in Britain is one of the most striking transitions seen in the archaeological record. 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4. 1.5. The race of the Angles or Saxons, invited by Vortigern, came to Britain in three warships... 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. 2.4. 2.5. 2.6. 2.7. 2.8. 2.9. 2.10. 2.11. the fight back by the Britons was too little and too late to save the British lowlands for an indigenous society and culture which had been heavily influenced by Romanisation and which thereafter failed to adapt sufficiently rapidly to the radically changed circumstances of the fifth century. 2.12. 2.13. 2.14. 2.15. 2.16. 2.17. 2.18. 2.19. 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4. 3.5. 3.6. 3.7. 3.8. 3.9. 3.10. 3.11. 3.12. 3.13. The early date of the cemetery has promoted speculation that there might be a significant migrant element among the population. 3.14. 3.15. 3.16. 3.17. 4.1. 4.2. 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. 5.5. References Budd, P. Cox, M. & S. Frazer, W.

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