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Felder & Soloman: Learning Styles and Strategies

Felder & Soloman: Learning Styles and Strategies
Richard M. Felder Hoechst Celanese Professor of Chemical Engineering North Carolina State University Barbara A. Soloman Coordinator of Advising, First Year College North Carolina State University Active learners tend to retain and understand information best by doing something active with it--discussing or applying it or explaining it to others. Reflective learners prefer to think about it quietly first. Everybody is active sometimes and reflective sometimes. How can active learners help themselves? If you are an active learner in a class that allows little or no class time for discussion or problem-solving activities, you should try to compensate for these lacks when you study. How can reflective learners help themselves? If you are a reflective learner in a class that allows little or no class time for thinking about new information, you should try to compensate for this lack when you study. Everybody is sensing sometimes and intuitive sometimes. How can sensing learners help themselves?

http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/ILSdir/styles.htm

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Sleep learning is possible: Associations formed when asleep remained intact when awake Is sleep learning possible? A new Weizmann Institute study appearing August 26 in Nature Neuroscience has found that if certain odors are presented after tones during sleep, people will start sniffing when they hear the tones alone -- even when no odor is present -- both during sleep and, later, when awake. In other words, people can learn new information while they sleep, and this can unconsciously modify their waking behavior. Sleep-learning experiments are notoriously difficult to conduct. For one thing, one must be sure that the subjects are actually asleep and stay that way during the "lessons." The most rigorous trials of verbal sleep learning have failed to show any new knowledge taking root.

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Visual Strategies Key words: different formats, space, graphs, charts, diagrams, maps and plans Description: This preference uses symbolism and different formats, fonts and colors to emphasise important points. It does not include video and pictures that show real images and it is not Visual merely because it is shown on a screen. If you have a strong Visual preference for learning you should use some or all of the following: From Roam With Love I randomly came upon this video the other day, and for someone who teaches both Kindergarten and 2nd grade, this video is like teacher voodoo. I mean seriously these kids look like professional actors in comparison to the daily dose of calamity that seems to rule over my class. I’m totally planning on trying to introduce the ‘blow the answer in your hand’ technique tomorrow.

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