background preloader

Mr. Nobody (2009)

Trivia An earlier, longer, work-in-progress version of the film was rejected for competition by Cannes, which offered that cut of "Mr. Nobody" a out-of-competition berth. See more » Quotes [first lines] Nemo Nobody adult: Like most living creatures, the pigeon quickly associates the pressing of the level with the reward.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0485947/

Related:  películas por ver

National Honor Society The National Honor Society, or NHS, is a nationwide organization in the United States and consists of many chapters in high schools. Selection is based on four criteria: scholarship, leadership, service, and character. The NHS requires some sort of service to the community, school, or other organizations. Yeshiva In the United States and Israel, the different levels of yeshiva education have different names. In the United States, elementary-school students are enrolled in a yeshiva, post-bar mitzvah-age students learn in a metivta, and undergraduate-level students learn in a beit midrash or yeshiva gedola (Hebrew: ישיבה גדולה‎, lit. "large yeshiva" or "great yeshiva"). In Israel, elementary-school students are enrolled in a Talmud Torah or cheder, post-bar mitzvah-age students learn in a yeshiva ketana (Hebrew: ישיבה קטנה‎, lit. "small yeshiva" or "minor yeshiva"), and high-school-age students learn in a yeshiva gedola.[3][4] A kollel is a yeshiva for married men.

Zazen In Zen Buddhism, zazen (literally "seated meditation"; Japanese: 坐禅; simplified Chinese: 坐禅; traditional Chinese: 坐禪; pinyin: zuò chán; Wade–Giles: tso4-ch'an2) is a meditative discipline practitioners perform to calm the body and the mind, and be able to concentrate enough to experience insight into the nature of existence and thereby gain enlightenment. Zazen in Rinzai school Kosho Uchiyama writes that Auguste Rodin's The Thinker, in which the "back, waist, legs, arms, and even fingers" are curled up, is the opposite of zazen posture.[1] Significance[edit]

Sōtō Sōtō Zen or the Sōtō school (曹洞宗, Sōtō-shū?) is the largest of the three traditional sects of Zen in Japanese Buddhism (the others being Rinzai and Ōbaku). It emphasizes Shikantaza, meditation with no objects, anchors, or content. The meditator strives to be aware of the stream of thoughts, allowing them to arise and pass away without interference. The Japanese brand of the sect was imported in the 13th century by Dōgen Zenji, who studied Caodong Buddhism (Chinese: 曹洞宗; pinyin: Cáodòng Zōng) abroad in China.

Grand Prix Grand Prix (French pronunciation: ​[ɡʁɑ̃pʁi], meaning "Grand Prize"; plural Grands Prix) may refer to: Competitions[edit] Racing[edit] Chess[edit] Equestrianism[edit] Combat sports[edit] Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film The Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film is one of the Academy Awards of Merit, or Oscars, handed out annually by the U.S.-based Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is given to a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States of America with a predominantly non-English dialogue track.[1] When the first Academy Awards ceremony was held on May 16, 1929 to honor films released in 1927/28, there was no separate category for foreign language films.

10 Top 10 AFI defines “animated” as a genre in which the film’s images are primarily created by computer or hand and the characters are voiced by actors. more AFI defines “romantic comedy” as a genre in which the development of a romance leads to comic situations. more AFI defines “western” as a genre of films set in the American West that embodies the spirit, the struggle and the demise of the new frontier. more AFI defines “sports” as a genre of films with protagonists who play athletics or other games of competition. more AFI defines “mystery” as a genre that revolves around the solution of a crime. more AFI defines “fantasy” as a genre where live-action characters inhabit imagined settings and/or experience situations that transcend the rules of the natural world. more

AFI's 10 Top 10 AFI's 10 Top 10 honors the ten greatest US films in ten classic film genres. Presented by the American Film Institute (AFI), the lists were unveiled on a television special broadcast by CBS on June 17, 2008. In the special, various actors and directors, among them Clint Eastwood, Quentin Tarantino, Kirk Douglas, Harrison Ford, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Roman Polanski, and Jane Fonda, discussed their admiration for and personal contributions to the films cited.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies The first of the AFI 100 Years... series of cinematic milestones, AFI's 100 Years…100 Movies is a list of the 100 best American movies, as determined by the American Film Institute from a poll of more than 1,500 artists and leaders in the film industry who chose from a list of 400 nominated movies. The 100-best list was unveiled in 1998. Presentation broadcast[edit] Criteria[edit] The Crucible The Crucible is a 1953 play by U.S. playwright Arthur Miller. It is a dramatized and partially fictionalized story of the Salem witch trials that took place in the Province of Massachusetts Bay during 1692 and 1693. Miller wrote the play as an allegory of McCarthyism, when the U.S. government blacklisted accused communists.[1] Miller himself was questioned by the House of Representatives' Committee on Un-American Activities in 1956 and convicted of "contempt of Congress" for refusing to identify others present at meetings he had attended.[2]

Yentl Yentl is a play by Leah Napolin and Isaac Bashevis Singer . Based on Singer's short story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy," it centers on a young girl who defies tradition by discussing and debating Jewish law and theology with her rabbi father. When he dies, she cuts her hair, dresses as a man, and sets out to find a yeshiva where she can continue to study Talmud and live secretly as a male named Anshel. AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes Criteria[edit] Jurors were asked to consider the following criteria in making their selections: Movie Quotation: A statement, phrase or brief exchange of dialogue spoken in an American film.[1] Lyrics from songs are not eligible.Cultural Impact: Movie quotations that viewers use in their own lives and situations; circulating through popular culture, they become part of the national lexicon.Legacy: Movie quotations that viewers use to evoke the memory of a treasured film, thus ensuring and enlivening its historical legacy. The list[edit] The table below reproduces the quotes as the AFI published them.

Related: