background preloader

Neoclassicism: An Introduction

Neoclassicism: An Introduction
The English Neoclassical movement, predicated upon and derived from both classical and contemporary French models, (see Boileau's L'Art Poetique (1674) and Pope's "Essay on Criticism" (1711) as critical statements of Neoclassical principles) embodied a group of attitudes toward art and human existence — ideals of order, logic, restraint, accuracy, "correctness," "restraint," decorum, and so on, which would enable the practitioners of various arts to imitate or reproduce the structures and themes of Greek or Roman originals. Though its origins were much earlier (the Elizabethan Ben Jonson, for example, was as indebted to the Roman poet Horace as Alexander Pope would later be), Neoclassicism dominated English literature from the Restoration in 1660 until the end of the eighteenth century, when the publication of Lyrical Ballads (1798) by Wordsworth and Coleridge marked the full emergence of Romanticism. Incorporated in the Victorian Web July 2000 /div>

http://www.victorianweb.org/previctorian/nc/ncintro.html

Related:  Statue of LibertyNeoclasssicalRestoration

Art 101: What is Neoclassicism? Next post in the “Art 101” series: Neo-Classicism. I’ve concentrated on Neoclassicism in art and architecture, but know that it is also prevalent in literature and music. What is Neoclassicism? Death of Marat - Jacques-Louis David, 1793 Neoclassicism is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw upon Western classical art and culture (usually that of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome). These movements were dominant in northern Europe during the mid-18th to the end of the 19th century.

and America 1750-1900 - What Is Neoclassicism? What is neoclassicism? How can teachers and students define this term quickly but correctly? Neoclassicism was a revived interest in classical forms and ideas that saturated European and American intellectual thought, fine arts and politics during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Neoclassicism was a transatlantic phenomenon. American neoclassicism was at first a channel of English antiquarianism. Americans had extremely close cultural and literary ties to London.

Restoration (England) Facts, information, pictures Restoration, in English history, the reestablishment of the monarchy on the accession (1660) of Charles II after the collapse of the Commonwealth (see under commonwealth) and the Protectorate. The term is often used to refer to the entire period from 1660 to the fall of James II in 1688, and in English literature the Restoration period (often called the age of Dryden) is commonly viewed as extending from 1660 to the death of John Dryden in 1700. Restoration of Charles II After the death of Oliver Cromwell in Sept., 1658, the English republican experiment soon faltered.

Neoclassicism, an introduction Nicolas Poussin, Et in Arcadia Ego, 1637-38, oil on canvas, 185 cm × 121 cm (72.8 in × 47.6 in) (Louvre) In opposition to the frivolous sensuality of Rococo painters like Jean-Honoré Fragonard and François Boucher, the Neoclassicists looked back to the French painter Nicolas Poussin for their inspiration (Poussin's work exemplifies the interest in classicism in French art of the 17th century ). The decision to promote "Poussiniste" painting became an ethical consideration—they believed that strong drawing was rational, therefore morally better. They believed that art should be cerebral, not sensual. The Neoclassicists, such as Jacques-Louis David (pronounced Da-VEED), preferred the well-delineated form—clear drawing and modeling (shading).

Neoclassicism main referencein the arts, historical tradition or aesthetic attitudes based on the art of Greece and Rome in antiquity. In the context of the tradition, Classicism refers either to the art produced in antiquity or to later art inspired by that of antiquity; Neoclassicism always refers to the art produced later but inspired by antiquity. Thus the terms Classicism and Neoclassicism are often used...architectureThe classicism that flourished in the period 1750–1830 is often known as “Neoclassicism,” in order to distinguish it, perhaps unnecessarily, from the Classical architecture of ancient Rome or of the Renaissance. The search for intellectual and architectural truth characterized the period. The English Restoration - May 25, 1660 Also on this day Lead Story On this day in 1977, Memorial Day weekend opens with an intergalactic bang as the first of George Lucas’ blockbuster Star Wars movies hits American theaters. The incredible success of Star Wars–it received seven Oscars, and earned $461 million in U.S. ticket sales and a gross of close to $800 million... American Revolution

18th- and 19th-Century France — Neoclassicism Overview The French Revolution began in 1789, when citizens stormed the Bastille prison in Paris. Within a few years, France had adopted and overthrown several constitutions and executed its former king. It found itself at war with most of the Continent and endured horrible violence at home during the Reign of Terror. Finally, in 1799, the successful young general Napoleon Bonaparte seized control and, in 1804, proclaimed himself emperor. Neoclassicism Neoclassicism was a movement that affected all art movements including architecture and came about because of many influences of the time. People were tired of the gaudiness, frivolity and innateness of the Rococo movement, and the archaeological findings during this century of the ancient Greek and Roman empires began to influence the art movements again. Some anti Rococo influences in architecture can be detected as early as the 18th century as noted in the Palladin architecture of and . Although the movement began in , and continued on to , , it soon spread throughout the world. This architecture is noted for its strength, its classical lines, its simple characteristics, and much is modeled after the Roman fashion.

Restoration Literature In a Nutshell The Restoration is a period in literary history full of humor and hanky-panky. Shocking, right? We thought dudes that looked like this would be super-uptight. The Puerto Rican Flag On the Statue Of Liberty While many may think this image has been altered, it was not. This is an actual photo taken on October 25, 1977 when a group of unarmed Puerto Rican activists gathered to protest demanding the release of Puerto Rican Nationalist prisoners. This was an act of symbolism illustrating their hopes of freedom and independence in putting an end to the discrimination that Puerto Ricans were enduring. On November 5, 2000, Puerto Rican activist, Alberto de Jesús Mercado, better known as Tito Kayak, along with five other protesters went to the top of the Statue of Liberty in New York City where he bravely placed the Puerto Rican flag on the statue’s crown. On June 13, 2005, Kayak was arrested at the United Nations headquarters in New York City for attempting to switch the United Nations banner with the Puerto Rican flag, while the United Nations Special Committee met to discuss the political state of the island.

Related: