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13 Common Sayings to Avoid

13 Common Sayings to Avoid
When I was a new teacher in middle school several centuries ago, I occasionally said things to students that I later regretted. In the last few years, I have witnessed or heard teachers say additional regretful things to students. Recently I asked students in my graduate courses (all practicing teachers) if they ever told their students anything they regret. After hearing these regrets and talking with children about what teachers said that bothered them, I compiled a list of things that never should be said. I've narrowed my list to 13 representative items. Some of these are related to control issues, others to motivation, and still more to management. 1. Students feel insulted when they hear this, and while some accept it as a challenge to do better, more lose their motivation to care. 2. Of course we occasionally are disappointed in things that our students do. 3. 4. In our book, Discipline With Dignity, Al Mendler and I make a strong case for the policy that fair is not equal. 5.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/13-common-sayings-to-avoid-richard-curwin

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