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Earth Science Picture of the Day

Earth Science Picture of the Day
Photographer: Marco Zante; Marco's Web site Summary Author: Marco Zante Shown above is a panorama of the beautiful Italian Alps as viewed on February 15, 2013. Monte Viso is the highest summit here, reaching 12,609 ft (3,841 m). This region is known as Parco Naturale della Val Troncea. It's mostly uninhabited by humans but marmots, ibex and chamois can all be found in these highlands. One of the more common trees in the park is the larch, a conifer that drops its leaves.

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Ocean Color Image Archive Page NOTE: All SeaWiFS images presented here are for research and educational use only. All commercial use of SeaWiFS data must be coordinated with GeoEye Category: All Gallery Images This SeaWiFs image provides a view of a Dust storm over the Red Sea. Northwest African Dust Storm Earth GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE from JPL Your planet is changing. We're on it. Our planet is changing. Through the gradual build-up of more greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, Earth is warming. As Earth warms, ocean waters expand and ice melts to make sea levels rise. Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2016 April 15 Mercury and Crescent Moon Set Image Credit & Copyright: Miguel Claro (TWAN, Dark Sky Alqueva)

Climate Change, Deforestation, Biomes and Ocean Currents, Plankton, Endangered Species - Earth Web Site Click for more detail Thermohaline Change Evidence is growing that the thermohaline current may be slowed or stopped by cold fresh water inputs to the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. This could occur if global warming is sufficient to cause large scale melting of arctic sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet. Such a change in the current may be gradual (over centuries) or very rapid (over a few years). Either would cause planet wide changes in climate. This effect may be part of what starts and stops the ice ages.

Extreme Weather Photo Contest Winners Thank you to everyone who submitted photos to the first installment of our GPM Extreme Weather Photo Competition. We loved all of your entries and thoroughly appreciate your participation! The GPM Photo Competition Committee is happy to announce our top 5 picks. We’ll be sending the submitters NASA bags and GPM stickers. Botany Photo of the Day Taisha wrote today's entry. We were both challenged to find the bona fide botanical name for this taxon, and had to give up (no results in the USPTO database, for one), so we left it as a black-fruited selection (read more below). Taisha writes: The past two days in Vancouver have been quite warm and enjoyably sunny--prompting many to get out into the garden. Some have begun planting seeds indoors or in greenhouses, and it won't be long until we can directly seed outdoors. Today, we have a photo of some caryopses of Zea mays.

Science On a Sphere Playlist Builder ../ftp_mirror/atmosphere/lightning/media/thumbnail_small.jpg Annual Lightning Flash Rate Map dataset.php? Total Lunar Eclipse This Weekend—Last One Until 2014 This weekend sky-watchers across most of the globe will have the chance to watch at least some of the last total lunar eclipse until 2014. The entire lunar eclipse will be visible in East Asia, Australia, and the far western portion of North America that includes Alaska and Canada's Yukon and Northwest Territories. The spectacle will last nearly three and a half hours, starting on Saturday at 4:45 a.m.

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Microbial Life - Educational Resources Teaching and learning about the diversity, ecology and evolution of the microbial world; discover the connections between microbial life, the history of the earth and our dependence on micro-organisms. The expansive Sunset Lake of the Black Sand Basin is one of the largest thermal bodies of water in Yellowstone National Park. Details How Far Away is the Horizon? On a clear day, you can see for miles and miles and miles. The old saying turns out to be just about true. For a six-foot tall person, the horizon is a little more than 3 miles (5 km) away. Geometry tells us that the distance of the horizon – i.e. the farthest point the eye can see before Earth curves out beneath our view – depends simply on the height of the observer. For example, if you stood atop Mount Everest (which is 29,029 feet, or 8,848 meters tall), the horizon would be about 230 miles (370 km) away. Add the effect of refraction, which bends rays of light as they pass through the atmosphere, and the horizon is even farther.

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