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PythonLearn - Self-paced learning Python

PythonLearn - Self-paced learning Python
The goal of this site is to provide a set of materials in support of my Python for Informatics: Exploring Information book to allow you to learn Python on your own. This page serves as an outline of the materials to support the textbook. You can download the exercises, audio, and video lectures to your local computer so you can play them locally. This can be done with either a Right-Click or a Control-Click in most browsers. Welcome Lecture - (YouTube, Download MP4, Audio podcast for all lectures) Get your copy of the Python for Informatics: Exploring Information. Install the appropriate version of Python and a text editor for your system following these instructions.

http://www.pythonlearn.com/

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Python for Fun This collection is a presentation of several small Python programs. They are aimed at intermediate programmers; people who have studied Python and are fairly comfortable with basic recursion and object oriented techniques. Each program is very short, never more than a couple of pages and accompanied with a write-up. I have found Python to be an excellent language to express algorithms clearly. Some of the ideas here originated in other programs in other languages. But in most cases I developed code from scratch from just an outline of an idea. LINUX LeJos - Java for Mindstorm Getting Started on Linux This version of the tutorial is for the 0.9 release of leJOS NXJ. Prerequisites Java Development Kit You will also need a Java Development Kit (JDK) on your PC. Note that a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is not sufficient as it does not allow you to compile Java programs.

How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3 Version date: October 2012 by Peter Wentworth, Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey, and Chris Meyers Benefits of this Interactive Textbook — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition Welcome! Take a tour, experiment with Python, join more than 850,000 other readers in learning how to think like a computer scientist with Python. (welcome) You can experiment with activecode examples right in the bookClick Show/Hide Code buttonOn line 7: change numTurtles = 10 to numTurtles = 6Click the Run buttonYou can do your homework right in the textbook.You can interact with other learners to discuss homeworkInteractive questions make sure that you are on track and help you focus.Codelens helps you develop a mental model of how Python works.Audio Tours help you understand the code.Short videos cover difficult or important topics.You can highlight text, and take notes in scratch editors This interactive book is a product of the Runestone Interactive Project at Luther College, led by Brad Miller and David Ranum. There have been many contributors to the project.

Teaching Kids to Code Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code. We are teaching coding to help our kids craft their future.

6 Free E-Books on Learning to Program with Python Python is an increasingly popular language, and it's also a favorite language teaching first time programmers. We've compiled a list of beginner's books to choose from. Just because they're free doesn't mean they aren't good. Some of the books listed here have been used in courses such as MIT's Introduction to Computer Science and Programming course and University of California, Davis' Basic Concepts of Programming course. A Byte of Python

Microsoft Robotics Studio – Installing and Connecting VPL Studio to your Mindstorm Bluetooth InstallationYou must have Visual Studio 2008 with Service Pack 1 installed OR the latest version of Visual C# Express which is available for download for free here. Note: I am running Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Premium.Download and install the Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio 2008 R3, available here. You need a Bluetooth module installed on your computer. My computer has one built into it. I believe you can purchase Bluetooth adapter from Lego if you do not have one. After installing the Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio, we now have the Visual Programming Language 2008 studio available.

BeginnersGuide/Programmers Please Note Because this is a Wiki page, users can edit it. You are therefore free to add details of material that other Python users will find useful. It is not an advertising page, and is here to serve the whole Python community. Users who continually edit pages to give their own materials (particularly commercial materials) prominence, or spam the listing with multiple entries which point to resources with only slightly altered material, may therefore find their accounts are disabled. untitled Python is an interpreted language, this means that your computer does not run Python code natively, but instead we run our code using the Python interpreter. There are two ways in which you can run Python code: Directly typing commands into the interpreterGood for experimenting with the language, and for some interactive workTyping code into a file and then telling the interpreter to run the code from this fileGood for larger programs, and when you want to run the same code repeatedly

Teaching kids how to write computer programs, by Marshall Brain by Marshall Brain Let's say that you have children, and you would like to help them learn computer programming at a youngish age. As the father of four kids, I have tried to approach it from several different angles. What I would like to do here is collect some ideas for parents who are looking for different options.

How to make beautiful data visualizations in Python with matplotlib It’s been well over a year since I wrote my last tutorial, so I figure I’m overdue. This time, I’m going to focus on how you can make beautiful data visualizations in Python with matplotlib. There are already tons of tutorials on how to make basic plots in matplotlib.

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