background preloader

PythonLearn - Exploring Data

PythonLearn - Exploring Data
Related:  Python

Benefits of this Interactive Textbook — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition This interactive book is a product of the Runestone Interactive Project at Luther College, led by Brad Miller and David Ranum. There have been many contributors to the project. Our thanks especially to the following: This book is based on the Original work by: Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey, and Chris MeyersActivecode based on SkulptCodelens based on Online Python TutorMany contributions from the CSLearning4U research group at Georgia Tech.ACM-SIGCSE for the special projects grant that funded our student Isaac Dontje Lindell for the summer of 2013.NSF The Runestone Interactive tools are open source and we encourage you to contact us, or grab a copy from GitHub if you would like to use them to write your own resources.

Teaching Kids to Code | EdSurge Guides Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code. We are teaching coding to help our kids craft their future. In this collection we share many different perspectives on coding, from a university professor's vantage point (MIT's Mitch Resnick describes why learning to code is like learning to learn) to an entrepreneur's reflections from his cross-country roadtrip to bring coding--and his stuffed dog--to classrooms across the U.S. We should always teach children to bake bread, feed the goats and wield a hammer.

Online Python Tutor - Learn programming by visualizing code execution Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? These are a few resources that parents can share with their kids to help them start learning about programming. Programming Tutorials From Made With Code by Google: Google's Made With Code project has a mission of encouraging girls to pursue careers in computer science. Inspiring Articles About Kids Learning to Code Still looking for some ideas? Coding Organizations for Kids For the non-coding parents, it can be difficult to know where to begin.

Geometry Zen - Looking at the multiverse from a Geometric Algebra perspective Teaching kids how to write computer programs, by Marshall Brain by Marshall Brain Quick Intro - If you are looking for a quick and easy way to teach your kid a real programming language, without downloading anything or buying anything, try these Python tutorials. Your kid will be writing and modifying code in just a few minutes. Marshall Brain's quick and easy Python tutorials Let's say that you have children, and you would like to help them learn computer programming at a youngish age. Let's start with a something important: Every kid is different. The second thing to realize is that real analytical skills often don't start appearing until age 11 or 12 or 13 in many kids, so expecting huge breakthroughs prior to that may be unrealistic. That being said, there are lots of fun things you can try as early as five or six... Games Let's start with a few games. Magic Pen (wait a few seconds to see the word "play", then click the word "Play") Fantastic Contraption Auditorium (Drag the circle-with-arrow-in-it around. I love Light Bot. Python for Kids RoboMind

untitled Python is an interpreted language, this means that your computer does not run Python code natively, but instead we run our code using the Python interpreter. There are two ways in which you can run Python code: Directly typing commands into the interpreterGood for experimenting with the language, and for some interactive workTyping code into a file and then telling the interpreter to run the code from this fileGood for larger programs, and when you want to run the same code repeatedly While we are initially exploring the language we will use the interpreter interactively. How you start the interpreter will depend on which operating system you are using, but on a Mac or Linux machine you should start a terminal and then just type the command python. If you want to exit the interactive interpreter you can type the command quit(), or type Ctrl-D. Open your terminal and start the interpreter and try typing in the commands we introduce below.

Code Avengers: learn to code games, apps and websites Introduction to solving biological problems with Python by pycam Kidsruby.com Python Examples On these pages, I have collected a bit of information about the Python programming language, along with a bunch of examples. These might be useful if you want to see some of the features without actually learning the language itself. You don't have to read through all of this in order. Just pick the pages which look most interesting to you. The topics are fairly independent from each other and don't require any existing knowledge about Python. Note: Some of the examples might require at least Python 2.3. Small code examples This page contains a few small code snippets, to give you an impression how the programming language looks like. Lambda functions Several useful concepts of Python have been borrowed from functional languages. Dynamic typing In Python, everything has a well-defined type, and these types can be handled completely at runtime in a dynamic and self-inspective fashion. Structured types List comprehensions Block indentation Python Tutorial - Read this one first!!!

Related: