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Norepinephrine

Norepinephrine
Medically it is used in those with severe hypotension. It does this by increasing vascular tone (tension of vascular smooth muscle) through α-adrenergic receptor activation. Areas of the body that produce or are affected by norepinephrine are described as noradrenergic. The terms noradrenaline (from the Latin) and norepinephrine (from the Greek) are interchangeable, with noradrenaline being the common name in most parts of the world. One of the most important functions of norepinephrine is its role as the neurotransmitter released from the sympathetic neurons to affect the heart. Norepinephrine is synthesized from dopamine by dopamine β-hydroxylase in the secretory granules of the medullary chromaffin cells.[7] It is released from the adrenal medulla into the blood as a hormone, and is also a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and sympathetic nervous system, where it is released from noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Medical uses[edit] Hypotension[edit] Related:  LoveWe Are Human.

Dopamine Dopamine (contracted from 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) is a hormone (also known as Prolactin Inhibiting Hormone/Factor - PIH or PIF) and neurotransmitter of the catecholamine and phenethylamine families that plays a number of important roles in the human brain and body. Its name derives from its chemical structure: it is an amine that is formed by removing a carboxyl group from a molecule of L-DOPA. In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine systems, one of which plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior. Several important diseases of the nervous system are associated with dysfunctions of the dopamine system. Outside the nervous system, dopamine functions in several parts of the body as a local chemical messenger. A variety of important drugs work by altering the way the body makes or uses dopamine. §Dopaminergic systems of the body[edit]

The new Acer Chromebook Creating a better, simpler computer and making it available for everyone is at the core of the Chromebook vision. It’s exciting to see people using Chromebooks as the perfect additional computer in the home, and we continue to work with our partners to make them easy-to-use and more affordable. Today, we’re delighted that our partner Acer is introducing a new addition to the Chromebook family: the new Acer C7 Chromebook. The new Acer C7 Chromebook delivers a hassle-free computing experience with speed, built-in security and the simplicity of automatic updates. As you’d expect from a Chromebook, it’s easy to share with others around the home. Starting tomorrow, the Acer Chromebook will be available for $199 in the U.S. on Google Play, BestBuy.com and rolling out this week in select Best Buy stores. Together with Acer, it’s great to welcome the newest addition to the Chromebook family. Posted by Sundar Pichai, SVP, Chrome & Apps

Mood swing Bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme mood swings, usually between mania and depression Overview[edit] Speed and extent[edit] Mood swings are universal, varying from the microscopic to the wild oscillations of manic depression,[3] so that a continuum can be traced from normal struggles around self-esteem, through cyclothymia, up to a depressive disease.[4] However most people's mood swings remain in the mild to moderate range of emotional ups and downs.[5] The duration of mood swings also varies. In such cases, mood swings can extend over several days, even weeks: these episodes may consist of rapid alternation between feelings of depression and euphoria.[7] Causes[edit] Changes in a person's energy level, sex drive, sleep patterns, self-esteem, concentration, drug or alcohol use can be signs of an oncoming mood disorder.[8] Many different things might trigger mood swings, from unhealthy diet or life style to drug abuse or hormonal imbalance. Brain chemistry[edit] Conditions[edit]

Epinephrine Physiological effects[edit] The adrenal medulla is a minor contributor to total circulating catecholamines (L-DOPA is at a higher concentration in the plasma),[11] though it contributes over 90% of circulating epinephrine. Little epinephrine is found in other tissues, mostly in scattered chromaffin cells. Following adrenalectomy, epinephrine disappears below the detection limit in the blood stream.[12] The adrenals contribute about 7% of circulating norepinephrine, most of which is a spill over from neurotransmission with little activity as a hormone.[13][14][15] Pharmacological doses of epinephrine stimulate α1, α2, β1, β2, and β3 adrenoceptors of the sympathetic nervous system. The term "adrenergic" is often misinterpreted in that the main sympathetic neurotransmitter is norepinephrine (noradrenaline), rather than epinephrine, as discovered by Ulf von Euler in 1946.[17][18] Exercise[edit] One physiological stimulus to epinephrine secretion is exercise. Emotional response[edit] U.S.

Hephaestus As a smithing god, Hephaestus made all the weapons of the gods in Olympus. He served as the blacksmith of the gods, and was worshipped in the manufacturing and industrial centers of Greece, particularly Athens. The cult of Hephaestus was based in Lemnos.[2] Hephaestus' symbols are a smith's hammer, anvil, and a pair of tongs. Etymology[edit] Hephaestus, is probably associated with the Linear B (Mycenean Greek) inscription 𐀀𐀞𐀂𐀴𐀍, A-pa-i-ti-jo, found at Knossos; the inscription indirectly attests his worship at that time because it is believed that it reads the theophoric name Haphaistios or Haphaistion.[3][4][5] The name of the god in Greek (Hēphaistos), has a root which can be observed in names of places, of Pre-Greek origin.[6] Epithets[edit] Hephaestus is given many epithets. Mythology[edit] The craft of Hephaestus[edit] Parentage[edit] Fall from Olympus[edit] In another account, Hephaestus, attempting to rescue his mother from Zeus' advances, was flung down from the heavens by Zeus.

Serotonin Serotonin /ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnɨn/ or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. Biochemically derived from tryptophan, serotonin is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of animals, including humans. It is popularly thought to be a contributor to feelings of well-being and happiness.[6] Serotonin secreted from the enterochromaffin cells eventually finds its way out of tissues into the blood. In addition to animals, serotonin is found in fungi and plants.[10] Serotonin's presence in insect venoms and plant spines serves to cause pain, which is a side-effect of serotonin injection. Functions[edit] Receptors[edit] Gauge of food availability (appetite)[edit] Serotonin functions as a neurotransmitter in the nervous systems of simple, as well as complex, animals. When humans smell food, dopamine is released to increase the appetite. Effects of food content[edit] In the digestive tract (emetic)[edit] [edit]

If Texas was to secede, how would they do it, could they do it, and would there be repercussions from the US government? Narcissistic Continuum "The wound of loneliness is like the Grand Canyon---a deep incision in the surface of our existence which has become an inexhaustible source of beauty and self-understanding." ~Henri J. M. Nouwen So we meet this handsome devil in a cowboy hat, one arm hanging casually over the fence post, his right boot shyly tucked behind his left as he stares deeply in our downcast eyes. We assume falling in love means never having to say, “I’m Lonely”. Infatuation masks the pain of emptiness with idealized notions of perfect love. I believe healthy relationships reach deep inside the heart, touching unresolved wounds demanding an airing out, a witnessing, a cleansing. Empty hearts cannot be filled by another human being, so don't pin a vacancy sign on your bosom. As a kid growing up in a farming community, I was forced to ride my bike for miles to see my dearest friend. In other words, “Fix it yourself, daughter. I know how it feels to be alone. Just you. It's all you. Henry and Eliza

Sympathetic nervous system The (ortho-) sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is one of three major parts of the autonomic nervous system (the others being the enteric and parasympathetic systems). Its general action is to mobilize the body's nervous system fight-or-flight response. It is, however, constantly active at a basic level to maintain homeostasis.[1] The name of the system has its origin related with the concept of sympathy.[2] Overview[edit] There are two kinds of neurons involved in the transmission of any signal through the sympathetic system: pre- and post-ganglionic. At the synapses within the ganglia, preganglionic neurons release acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on postganglionic neurons. The two exceptions mentioned above are postganglionic neurons of sweat glands and chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. Function[edit] The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for up- and down-regulating in many homeostatic mechanisms in living organisms.

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