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Five-Minute Film Festival: Copyright and Fair Use for Educators I absolutely love it when teachers and students create, remix, and mash up media; it's a fantastic way to encourage deeper learning and media literacy. But one issue that complicates digital freedom of expression is copyright law. While many would argue that copyright law is outdated and badly in need of an overhaul, it's still critical that adults and kids alike have a basic understanding of what's legal and ethical while playing with other people's intellectual property. Here's a list of videos I collected to help you navigate the murky waters of copyright law in educational settings. Video Playlist: Understanding Copyright and Fair Use Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube.

Music Company Does Not Own 'Happy Birthday' Song Copyright, Judge Rules A federal judge on Tuesday ruled that Warner/Chappell Music does not own the copyright rights to the famous "Happy Birthday to You" song, which has become a nearly mandatory part of birthday celebrations across the country and beyond. Federal judge George H. King made the ruling Tuesday in response to a lawsuit that sought to have the song placed in the public domain. Tuesday's ruling means the song is now in the public domain and the company can no longer charge for public performances, the law firm that filed the suit said. Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video • Code of Best Practices • Common Fair Use Myths • Getting to Know Your Code of Best Practices • Copyright Backgrounder • Recut, Reframe, Recycle

U.S. Copyright Office U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index Welcome to the U.S. Video and Copyright Please note that ALA cannot give legal advice. If you need legal advice, you should contact an intellectual property attorney. For general information and guidance, you may contact Program Director Carrie Russell of the ALA Washington (DC) Office, at phone number 1-800-941-8478 or via e-mail to crussell@ala.org. See the blog sponsored by ALA's Office for Information Technology Policy in Washington, the Copyright Advisory Network: A community of librarians, copyright scholars, policy wonks. Join us.

Teaching Copyright As today's tech-savvy teens become increasingly involved with technology and the Internet for learning, work, civic engagement, and entertainment, it is vital to ensure that they understand their legal rights and responsibilities under copyright law and also how the law affects creativity and innovation. This curriculum is designed to give teachers a comprehensive set of tools to educate students about copyright while incorporating activities that exercise a variety of learning skills. Lesson topics include: the history of copyright law; the relationship between copyright and innovation; fair use and its relationship to remix culture; peer-to-peer file sharing; and the interests of the stakeholders that ultimately affect how copyright is interpreted by copyright owners, consumers, courts, lawmakers, and technology innovators. Unit Goals Educate students about copyright law, including the concepts of fair use, free speech, and the public domain. Objectives for Students

Copyright issues when using music in videos Welcome to the digital age! Do you remember many years ago when trying to produce a video for your school took several thousand dollars worth of elaborate and bulky video equipment to make it happen? Now here we are in 2008, and with a very inexpensive digital video camera and some free software, you, yes even you can produce, publish and broadcast your video around the world – how exciting! Silvia Tolisano- Langwitches Blog No! You can’t just take it! No! You can’t take it, because you found it on Google! No! You can’t just right click>save>use, just because you can! Photographer Files $1 Billion Suit Against Getty for Licensing Her Public Domain Images Carol Highsmith self-portrait in a broken mirror that she photographed during the Willard Hotel restoration, Washington, DC (c. 1980–90) (image via Wikimedia Commons) In December, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website. It demanded payment of $120. This was how Highsmith came to learn that stock photo agencies Getty and Alamy had been sending similar threat letters and charging fees to users of her images, which she had donated to the Library of Congress for use by the general public at no charge. Now, Highsmith has filed a $1 billion copyright infringement suit against both Alamy and Getty for “gross misuse” of 18,755 of her photographs. “The defendants [Getty Images] have apparently misappropriated Ms.

How copyright is killing your favorite memes Meme by the Washington Post, photo by George Mobley for National Geographic. Yes, we had to pay to post this Socially Awkward Penguin. (Getty) Socially Awkward Penguin is arguably one of the most recognizable memes on the Internet. The blue-backgrounded image of the off-balance penguin — superimposed with funny text — has been plastered across every message board, forum and social network on the Web. It’s an inside joke. Posting an Internet Meme? You May Receive a Getty Letter - Art Law Journal Memes have proliferated the internet since the dawn of social media. An image, usually taken entirely out of context, is paired with witty, often sarcastic banter whose only goal is to make you laugh. But did you know that there are often art licensing issues surrounding the use of top internet memes, and that you may have to be prepared to make a fair use argument if the owner of the images cries copyright infringement? Take the case of the German blogger Geeksisters who recently received a Getty letter (otherwise known as the Getty extortion letter to our readers) concerning their “illegal” use of a top internet meme.

Copyright, Memes and the Perils of Viral Content - Plagiarism Today The definition of the world “meme”, in the broadest sense, is “An idea, behavior, style or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture”. Internet memes are a subset of that behavior that takes place online, where people spread a cultural touchstone from person to person, often referred to as going “viral”. But what is and is not a meme can be tough to define. After all, a meme can be almost anything including a hashtag on Twitter, a photo with changing user-generated captions and even a short video a cat pretending to play a keyboard.

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