background preloader

20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking

20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking
20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking by TeachThought Staff This is part 1 in our #iteachthought campaign. This is our equivalent to “back to school,” and is intended to help you focus in the 2015-2016 school year on taking a thoughtful approach to your craft as a teacher. Among these shifts we’ll talk about is turning our focus from content and teaching to thinkers and thinking. This is a student-centered approach to pedagogy (and heautagogy), and will consist of three parts: Part 1: Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking Part 2: Learning Profiles: What Great Teachers Know About Their Students Part 3: 50 Questions To Ask Your Students On The First Day Of School Learning Is An Ecology Can how you setup your classroom impact how students think? Desks are a staple of the ‘modern’ classroom as we know it. So what can we do? So, the bit about “classroom setups impacting thinking.” Note, we’ve placed an asterisk* beside those approaches that are more strongly suited to “thought” than others.

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/20-ways-to-setup-a-classroom-to-help-your-students-think/

Related:  Inredningsdetaljer - Classroom design/decorIdées pour la classe inverséeEducational environmentClassroom IIIMöbler - Furniture

edutopia There are many elements to consider as you plan for the next school year. You always review critical pieces like standards, curriculum, instructional activities, and testing, but you also think about the classroom space and how to arrange desks, set up bulletin boards, and organize materials. You can bring these seemingly disconnected components together in a system of seven learning zones. The discovery, news, supplies, community, quiet, teacher, and subject area zones will help you establish routines, save time, and maintain your sanity from the first through the last days of school. 1. Discovery Zone Reasons and Research – Why Schools Need Collaborative Learning Spaces Creative Commons license image source We’ve converted a few classrooms to more collaborative spaces over the last few years at The College of Westchester, and faculty reaction has generally been quite positive. These initial room changes have revolved around modifying the layout of a few classrooms from the row-by-row footprint of the traditional lecture room to a more interactive, group-oriented layout of round tables. We are now looking to move towards the next iteration of this evolution by creating a technologically enabled space for collaborative learning. I had the good fortune of sitting through several sessions at the recent UB Tech conference focused on successful implementations of flexible learning spaces.

fortune © Time Inc. All rights reserved. Fortune.com is a part of the Time.com network of sites. What The Future of Furniture Looks Like Aside from its elgant Italian design, this furniture opens up the space in crowded apartments. They are a revolution in furniture design. Imported by Resource Furniture, the US importer for CLEI (Italy) and Sellex (Spain) series of fine quality transformable furniture. Link Flixxy editors search the internet daily, to find the very best videos for you: SELECTION: From the 1 billion videos uploaded to YouTube daily, Flixxy editors selects only 3-5 videos to be added to the site daily. New Teachers: Designing Learning Environments The Importance of Classroom Design Why does the physical design of classrooms matter? Mark Phillips discusses this question in "A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms" and offers examples of and resources for turning impersonal spaces into student-friendly havens of learning.

8 Technologies That Will Shape Future Classrooms What does the future of learning hold? What will classrooms of the future be like? Emerging technologies such as cloud computing, augmented reality (AR) and 3D printing are paving the way for the future of education in ways we may have yet to see. At the very least though, we can extrapolate from what these promising technologies and predict how schools will adopt them in time to come. However, just as the original intentions for new technology often give way to innovative and unpredictable usage, we can never be sure if a twist is waiting for these rising stars. As for now, let us observe their progress and speculate on how these 8 up-and-coming technologies could potentially change education for the better.

10 Excellent Google Drive Apps Teachers Should Try This School Year August 28, 2015 Here is another back-to-school goodie for teachers. This is basically a selection of some of the best educational Google Drive apps to use in your instruction. As is the case with Mac, Chromebook, and Chrome lists, all of these apps have been covered in separate review posts in the past and are also deemed to be among the most popular among teachers and educators based on the feedback we received following their publication. "This extension allow you to save web content directly to Google Drive through a browser action or context menu.

The Sonic Chair - Surround Sound ShareThisThe sonic chair provides a unique audio experience, allowing you to sit at the very center of a sound system. Whether you enjoy listening to symphony orchestras, rock concerts, or audio books – the integrated satellite speakers are precisely adapted to your ears. The two latest models even include an ipod docking station or a 20" mac touchscreen. Words of Wisdom for the Introverts in the Classroom  School can be difficult for the young introverts of this world. The outspoken are repeatedly praised for their willingness to jump in and command the conversation. Quick thinkers, regardless of the accuracy of their answers, earn those coveted checks for class participation over and over again when report card time rolls around. They are often tapped as leaders because they almost never hesitate when called upon to complete a task. Their confidence soars and they thrive within the classroom because we live in an extrovert-dominant world where active engagement is interpreted as being a team player.

The furniture debate Sean McDougall argues that sitting comfortably really can make the difference to the way we learn in schools. Sometimes the most amazing thoughts strike in the strangest of places. Archimedes had his Eureka moment in the bath. Newton had his sitting under an apple tree. Does Your Classroom Tell a Story? Do you have mystery objects that attract the curiosity of students, leading them to ask questions that foster meaningful conversations? Is your classroom visually stimulating for the students? Does it cultivate creativity, and more importantly, is it filled with objects, images, and even props that help your students learn -- even when they think they're not learning? Like most teachers, I decorate my classroom with posters and objects that help promote learning, but that also lend a little pizzazz to an otherwise humdrum learning environment.

8 Tips and Tricks to Redesign Your Classroom Editor's Note: Author David Bill is a designer and educator who consulted with The Third Teacher+ on the Remake Your Class project highlighted in the videos below. The tips in this post go along with the companion video. We are excited by the simplicity (and low price tag!) of this great redesign. Back to school: Canada lagging in push to teach kids computer coding Armed with rope, pictures and elephant headbands, it looks like this group of nine-year-olds is setting up a huge game of hopscotch. But they're really laying out the biggest thing to hit British schools in a century. As the students direct each other through the grid they've built, they're learning the basic fundamentals of computer coding, in the process moving beyond how to use computers to how computers work. "We're actually enabling them and empowering them with skills and capability so that they can choose how they solve problems using technology," says Peter Gaynord, a teacher at Histon and Impington Junior School near Cambridge, England. This class is far from unique.

Sitting straight 'bad for backs' Sitting up straight is not the best position for office workers, a study has suggested. Scottish and Canadian researchers used a new form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to show it places an unnecessary strain on your back. They told the Radiological Society of North America that the best position in which to sit at your desk is leaning back, at about 135 degrees. Experts said sitting was known to contribute to lower back pain. Data from the British Chiropractic Association says 32% of the population spends more than 10 hours a day seated.

Related: