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MathFiction Homepage

MathFiction Homepage
a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston) The Mathematical Fiction Homepage is my attempt to collect information about all significant references to mathematics in fiction. You can see the entire list (sorted by author, title or publication date). You can browse through the database to find your favorite genre, topic, motif or medium. If you've got more specific criteria in mind, try our search page. If you've been here before and just want to see what's been added recently, look at our listing of new/recently modified entries. For more information about this site, click here. (Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)

http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/default.html

Related:  BooklistsMathematics Subject GuideMath, Numbers, Data, etc

Great Graphic Novels 2014 The list of 78 titles, drawn from 122 official nominations, is presented annually at the ALA Midwinter Meeting. The books, recommended for those ages 12-18, meet the criteria of both good quality literature and appealing reading for teens. In addition, the Great Graphic Novels for Teens Committee created a Top Ten list of titles that exemplify the quality and range of graphic novels appropriate for teen audiences, denoted by an asterisk. “The 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens list explores ancient Chinese rebellions, first love, modern day Uganda, futuristic scenarios, civil rights in America and everything in between.” said Chair Tessa Barber. “The graphic novels on this list are first rate in the marriage of storytelling and art and have appeal to a wide range of teen readers.

Math in Daily Life When you buy a car, follow a recipe, or decorate your home, you're using math principles. People have been using these same principles for thousands of years, across countries and continents. Whether you're sailing a boat off the coast of Japan or building a house in Peru, you're using math to get things done.

In Mathematics, Mistakes Aren’t What They Used To Be: Computers are changing the way proofs are done Vladimir Voevodsky had no sooner sat himself down at the sparkling table, set for a dinner party at the illustrious Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, than he overturned his empty wine glass, flipping bowl over stem and standing the glass on its rim—a signal to waiters that he would not be imbibing. He is not always so abstemious, but Voevodsky, that fall of 2013, was in the midst of some serious work. Founded in 1930, the Institute has been called “the earthly temple of mathematical and theoretical physics,” and is a hub for all manner of rigorous intellectual inquiry. Einstein’s old house is around the corner. In the parking lot a car sports a nerdy bumper sticker reading, “Don’t Believe Everything You Think”—which might very well be aimed directly at Voevodsky. On the weight of Kapranov’s recommendation, Voevodsky found himself accepted for graduate studies at Harvard, without even having applied.

Millions of Free eBooks and Audio Books Online Introduction This is the launch page for the pages here at Gizmo's Tech Support Alert that list sites with free ebooks and audiobooks. There are well over a million free ebooks and audiobooks at the sites listed within these pages.

Women Mathematicians, Sponsored by Agnes Scott College Welcome to the web site for biographies of women in mathematics. These pages are part of an on-going project at Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, Georgia, to illustrate the numerous achievements of women in the field of mathematics. Here you can find biographical essays or comments on the women mathematicians profiled on this site, as well as additional resources about women in mathematics. Each time this page is reloaded, a randomly selected photo is displayed to the left (if Javascript is enabled). Click on the image to go to the profile of that woman.

Goodbye P value: is it time to let go of one of science's most fundamental measures? Ahem, @PaulSMattson How should scientists interpret their data? Emerging from their labs after days, weeks, months, even years spent measuring and recording, how do researchers draw conclusions about the results of their experiments? Statistical methods are widely used but our recent research in Nature Methods reveals that one of the classic science statistics, the P value, may not be as reliable as we like to think. Scientists like numbers, because they can be compared with other numbers. And often these comparisons are made with statistical analyses, to formalise the process. Literature of the Civil War “The dream of humanity, the vaunted Union we thought so strong, so impregnable — lo! it seems already smash’d like a china plate. One bitter, bitter hour — perhaps proud America will never again know such an hour.

21 GIFs That Explain Mathematical Concepts “Let's face it; by and large math is not easy, but that's what makes it so rewarding when you conquer a problem, and reach new heights of understanding.” Danica McKellar As we usher in the start of a new school year, it’s time to hit the ground running in your classes! Math can be pretty tough, but since it is the language in which scientists interpret the Universe, there’s really no getting around learning it. Check out these gifs that will help you visualize some tricky aspects of math, so you can dominate your exams this year. Ellipse:

The Course Hath No Bottom: the 20,000-Person Seminar A few years ago, Sean Michael Morris and I wrote, “Meaningful relationships are as important in a class of three as they are in a class of 10,000.” In the rest of that article, we wonder at questions of scale: how to scale up, when to scale down, and what it might mean to scale sideways. My question here: is it possible to scale up and down simultaneously — to create more and more intimate learning experiences for larger and larger groups of learners? 10 Excellent Communities for Book Lovers When I was working on the post entitled The Best 10 Places to Find and Download e-Books, I singled out some websites that were supposed to be featured in that list and sat them aside. I noticed that these website deserve their own post because they offer something different . These are basically platforms where there is much of social interaction to them than others. In other words, they are like the traditional book clubs where readers would meet and discuss the books they have read. However, this digital version is different in that it is asynchronous and has no temporal or geographical boundaries.

A listing of fictional books containing mathematic themes. by nda_librarian Apr 30

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