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Debate: Does Fashion Have A Place In Politics?

Debate: Does Fashion Have A Place In Politics?

http://www.stylist.co.uk/fashion/does-fashion-have-a-place-in-politics

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Topshop Gets Called Out For Unrealistic Mannequin Body Standards By now, it seems as if most retailers have been involved in some sort of controversy. And while some have been because of tasteless graphics, or hypersexualized advertisements, one thing we continue to see over and over again—and frankly, we're tired of it—is the ridiculous body standards reinforced by the mannequins that model the clothing. Topshop, the popular British brand that boasts collaborations with stars like Gigi Hadid and Cara Delevingne, has come under fire after a shopper noticed that the store's mannequin had extremely thin legs.

Can Feminists Like Fashion? - Forbes Céline 2012 Runway Feminism and fashion have always had a rocky relationship, a point hammered home in an article in Ms. magazine’s January issue, “If The Clothes Fit: A Feminist Take On Fashion.” The piece explores the tumultuous role that fashion has historically played in gender politics—both serving as a medium for the advancement of women, and as a weapon of restraint. It’s hard to deny the key role that fashion has played in the women’s movement. The Ms. article points to New York City women garment workers in the early 20th century who wore hats to signify that they were earning their own money, and thus financially independent. Women in the 1980s adopted a male style of dress (ties, tailored skirt suits, shoulder pads) in order to gain a foothold in the male dominated world of business.

What Brexit Means for the Fashion Industry Today's news that Britain has voted to leave the European Union has sent stock markets plunging and hammered the British pound, which hit its lowest point in decades. Although it will likely take years for Britain to untangle itself from the EU, many in the fashion industry are left questioning what the change could mean for their livelihoods. Of course, London is a major fashion player, with the fashion industry contributing an estimated $38 billion to the UK economy in 2014, according to the Business of Fashion. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below A weak pound and uncertainty about new tariffs could mean major challenges for UK-based businesses, which often source fabrics and produce in other parts of Europe. After Brexit, which way for fashion? The impact of Brexit on the fashion industry is daunting, brain-scrambling and multi-levelled. The industry directly contributed £28bn to the UK’s economy in 2015 and employs 880,000 in roles from manufacturing to retail. For many British designers and stores, there will be an immediate hit on costs and margins. Once Brexit has been achieved, it could jeopardise design talent and retailers within the global marketplace forever.

The Powerful Message Behind the 'Bad Blood' Music Video  Taylor Swift launched her "Bad Blood" music video as an opener for the Billboard Music Awards last weekend. We were all gearing up for this video as Taylor heightened our excitement by tweeting, Instagram-ing and Tumblr-ing myriads of posters of each one of the of characters that would guest star. However, we weren't emotionally prepared when she actually released it because not only did the video slay in every way, it taught a bigger lesson to the world than we were expecting. So, let's start with how we saw big female names star in Taylor's video, such as Hayley Williams, Cara Delevingne, Jessica Alba, Cindy Crawford, Gigi Hadid, Ellie Goulding, Hailee Steinfeld, Lena Dunham, Lily Aldridge, Martha Hunt, Karlie Kloss, Zendaya Coleman, Mariska Hargitay, Ellen Pompeo, Serayah McNeill and Selena Gomez. Wow, that's a lot, isn't it? Anyway, let's take a look at the bigger picture.

Inside Fashion’s Instagram Wars NEW YORK, United States — Throughout the year, Proenza Schouler designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez and their team use Instagram to communicate with more than 342,000 followers, posting images that represent the world of the brand. But as fashion week kicks off, the Proenza boys, as they are known in the industry, are upping their game. For Spring 2016, the designers have partnered with reportage and portraiture photographer Landon Nordeman to capture and convey the brand’s take on the season with a total of five images posted over five days. “This project explores different elements of our design process: everything from more abstract inspiration and research, to sketching and sample making in our atelier,” Hernandez says. “It is a more intimate look,” McCollough continues. “We wanted to show the attention to detail and how things are made, which are often overlooked."

10 Influential Fashion Designers You’ve Probably Never Heard Of It’s curious to wonder why some designer’s legacies are preserved and others fall to the wayside. Is it the lack of PR, no heir to the design house or were they just bad designers? While certain designers of the past are remembered today for their ingenuity or are attributed with the "invention" of a particular garment, such as Mary Quant and the miniskirt, scores of designers--like Redfern, Lucile or Mainbocher--who were widely influential in their time have seemingly been forgotten. The task of resurrecting these legacies thus falls upon the fashion historian, so sit back for a mini fashion history lesson of 10 fashion designers you've probably never heard of but should definitely know. For more fashion history by Part Nouveau, click here.

Fashion’s most iconic political statements As the date of the UK election draws nearer, politicians have turned their attention to fashion and pop culture in an attempt to wrest the youth vote. David Cameron has claimed Kardashian kinship, Nick Clegg has starred in an “Uptown Funk” election anthem, and the Labour Party has channelled Katharine Hamnett with their “Hell Yes” slogan tee. These recent antics come as no surprise – fashion and politics have long been linked. Last week we paid tribute to Dame Vivienne Westwood’s best protests, one of the great masters of using fashion as a vehicle for social commentary. Now we turn our attention to other designers who have used their clothes to shine a spotlight on important issues.

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