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Jewish angelic hierarchy

Jewish angelic hierarchy
Angels in Judaism (angel: Hebrew: מַלְאָךְ‎ mal’āḵ, plural mal’āḵīm) appear throughout the Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Rabbinic literature, and traditional Jewish liturgy. They are categorized in different hierarchies. Maimonides[edit] Maimonides, in his Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazakah: Yesodei ha-Torah, counts ten ranks of angels in the Jewish angelic hierarchy, beginning from the highest: Kabbalah[edit] According to the Golden Dawn's interpretation of the Kabbalah, there are ten archangels, each commanding one of the choirs of angels and corresponding to one of the Sephirot. See also[edit] Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn References[edit] External links[edit] Related:  TheologyAngles of Angels. ..

e2fc45c0f67df98409ee4f2c9da31f28 Christian angelic hierarchy For other angelic hierarchies, see Hierarchy of angels. Orthodox icon of nine orders of angels. The most influential Christian angelic hierarchy was that put forward by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite in the 4th or 5th century in his book De Coelesti Hierarchia (On the Celestial Hierarchy). During the Middle Ages, many schemes were proposed, some drawing on and expanding on Pseudo-Dionysius, others suggesting completely different classifications. According to medieval Christian theologians, the angels are organized into several orders, or "Angelic Choirs".[1][2] Pseudo-Dionysius (On the Celestial Hierarchy) and Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica) drew on passages from the New Testament, specifically Ephesians 1:21 and Colossians 1:16, to develop a schema of three Hierarchies, Spheres or Triads of angels, with each Hierarchy containing three Orders or Choirs. First Sphere[edit] The first sphere angels serve as the heavenly servants of God the Son incarnated. Seraphim[edit] Cherubim[edit] St. C.

Nephilim Etymology[edit] In the Hebrew Bible[edit] The term "Nephilim" occurs just twice in the Hebrew Bible, both in the Torah. The second is Numbers 13:32–33, where ten of the Twelve Spies report that they have seen fearsome giants in Canaan. The nature of the nephilim is complicated by the ambiguity of Genesis 6:4, which leaves it unclear whether they are the "sons of God" or their offspring who are the "mighty men of old, men of renown". Interpretations[edit] There are effectively two views[15] regarding the identity of the nephilim, which follow on from alternative views about the identity of the sons of God (Bənê hāʼĕlōhîm): Fallen angels[edit] Main article: Fallen angel Some Christian commentators have argued against this view,[21][22] citing Jesus's statement that angels do not marry.[23] Others believe that Jesus was only referring to angels in heaven.[24] Second Temple Judaism[edit] Descendants of Seth and Cain[edit] Arguments from culture and mythology[edit]

nine grades of angels The world tree or mountain are conditional symbols of a centre where there is the global vertical axis, that in aggregate with a horizontal surface of the world forms coordinates of world space. Namely vertical global axis corresponds with the central numerological number 5 which is in the centre of magic square of nine numbers in a context of numerology, and other numbers of the magic square symbolize horizontal measurements of the world. Horizontal and vertical measurements of the world are congruous, namely vertical axis has numerical gradation which are projections of numbers on a horizontal surface. Accordingly physiognomy of human facial traits correspond with numerological numbers on different coordinates which designate versatile phenomena of world around, but which coincide in features of a human face. The following page compares physiognomy of a human face to circles of the universe in the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. previous - upwards - following

Angels & Angelology In the Bible Many biblical writers assume the existence of beings superior to man in knowledge and power, but subordinate to (and apparently creatures of) the one God. These beings serve as His attendants, like courtiers of an earthly king, and also as His agents to convey His messages to men and to carry out His will. In the Apocrypha In post-biblical literature angels frequently manifest themselves as independent beings, distinguishable by their own names and individual traits. In the Talmud & Midrash In the talmudic age, belief in angels was general, among both scholars and laymen. In the Liturgy The concepts concerning angels, as developed in the aggadah, have also been incorporated into the liturgy. In Jewish Mysticism Mysticism distinguishes several categories of angels: ministering and corrupting angels, angels of mercy, and angels of In Jewish Philosophy Philo Philo identified the angels of Scripture with the demons of the Greek philosophers (Gig. 2:6; I Sonn. 142). Modern Period

Eusebius Sources[edit] Little is known about the life of Eusebius. His successor at the see of Caesarea, Acacius, wrote a Life of Eusebius, a work that has since been lost. Eusebius' own surviving works probably only represent a small portion of his total output. Early life[edit] In his Ecclesiastical History, Eusebius writes of Dionysius of Alexandria as his contemporary. By the 3rd century, Caesarea had a population of about 100,000. Soon after Pamphilus settled in Caesarea (ca. 280s), he began teaching Eusebius, who was then somewhere between twenty and twenty-five.[20] Because of his close relationship with his schoolmaster, Eusebius was sometimes called Eusebius Pamphili: "Eusebius, son of Pamphilus". In the 290s, Eusebius began work on his magnum opus, the Ecclesiastical History, a narrative history of the Church and Christian community from the Apostolic Age to Eusebius' own time. Bishop of Caesarea[edit] Death[edit] Much like his birth, the exact date of Eusebius’ death is unknown.

The Gnostic World View: A Brief Summary of Gnosticism Gnosis Archive | Library | Bookstore | Index | Web Lectures | Ecclesia Gnostica | Gnostic Society GNOSTICISM IS THE TEACHING based on Gnosis, the knowledge of transcendence arrived at by way of interior, intuitive means. Although Gnosticism thus rests on personal religious experience, it is a mistake to assume all such experience results in Gnostic recognitions. In the following summary, we will attempt to encapsulate in prose what the Gnostic myths express in their distinctively poetic and imaginative language. The Cosmos All religious traditions acknowledge that the world is imperfect. Like Buddhism, Gnosticism begins with the fundamental recognition that earthly life is filled with suffering. Many religions advocate that humans are to be blamed for the imperfections of the world. Ways of evading the recognition of the flawed creation and its flawed creator have been devised over and over, but none of these arguments have impressed Gnostics. Deity The Human Being Salvation Conduct Destiny

The Seven Traditional Planets The 7 Traditional Planets of the ancients. You must remember that Neptune, Pluto and Uranus had not been discovered, as the ancient magi did not have the necessary astronomical equipment. However the Archangels who are now associated with those planets where know. THE SUN The day associated with the Sun is, of course, Sunday and the image and feel of the Sun's rays is the personification of fire. So the Sun has rulership over health, vitality, ego, the heart, creativity, power and success, leadership, friendship and advancement. The Archangel who has rulership over the Sun is the Archangel Michael. Click here to see a comprehensive listing of correspondences. THE MOON Monday is the Moon's day, and the days powers are greatly enhance when a New Moon fall on a Monday. The Moon has rulership over clairvoyance, sleep, psychic dreams, emotions, astral travel, imagination and secrets, women's mysteries, fertility and reincarnation. The Archangel who has rulership over the Moon - Gabriel.

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