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Origami - Folding Instructions

Origami - Folding Instructions

http://www.origamee.net/diagrams/diagrams.html

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Six paper flowers It got into my head that I needed to make some paper flowers. I don’t know why. But I figured it wouldn’t be a big deal because the Internet is a veritable smörgåsbord of craft tutorials, and all I had to do was fire up Lappy 5000 and pick one out. How to make 25 paper Christmas ornaments Here's a roundup of ornaments you can make from paper.Above left: I made with these instructionsAbove right: I made with these instructions (Update: this is now an old post; some of the links no longer work.) More: Printable snowflake 1 Printable snowflake 2 Paper snowflakes stapled together into something 3-D Not 3-D, but nice snowflake cutting templates Origami star Ornament made with circle cut-outsFlower ornament Ball-like star Ball-like... ballFlower ballGeodesic ballMulti-colored balls made this way, but fastened with wireMany-pointed star Mini star-shaped bookletGlitter star ornamentsMoravian stars Recycled paper ornamentCrystal ornament free download plus a gallery of inspiration Huge spiky star

Origami Rose in Bloom (Part 1) Explore Publish Login|Sign Up share what you make With Instructables you can share what you make with the world, and tap into an ever-growing community of creative experts. How it Works » New Instructable » Origami Kusudama Flower Folding Instructions - How to make an Origami Kusudama Flower Kusudama (translated as "medicine ball") were traditionally used as incense and poutpurri, from real flowers or herbs. Decorative kusudama are made by using folded paper origami units glued together. These instructions show how to make a simple kusudama flower. Twelve (12) of these flowers can be glued together to make a ball.

Video on How to Make a Kusudama With the Carambola Flower by Carmen Sprung This Kusudama can be considered modular origami, and it is based on a beautiful flower model, folded from a pentagon and originally created by Carmen Sprung (Germany). She calls it “carambola” perhaps because of its resemblance to a cross section of a carambola –also known as star fruit. On her website, Happy Folding, Sara Adams (Germany) presents a video showing how to make a pentagon and how to fold the origami carambola. The folding process, as Sara demonstrates, is both easy and pleasing. The Kusudama structure is that of a dodecahedron and made with twelve pentagonal flowers. It can be used as a holiday decoration or given as given as a handmade Christmas gift.

Recovered The Origami Page This section is intended for the beginner. It introduces all of the major folds in origami and shows how they are done. It also provides a large number of simple models that aim to allow one to practice these folds. By the time you have finished this section of my web site, you should be able to fold most of the models in the other sections. If you cannot complete a particular fold or section, please do not give up. 50+ Paper Flower Tutorials & Templates: {Free Here’s a lovely assortment of paper flowers to make, I’ve organized them in a few sections for easier browsing: Bouquets & Centerpieces, Tissue Paper, Crepe, Origami and the rest under general tutorials. Many of these have free templates to download and most are surprisingly easy to make! I’ve also compiled a vintage booklet into a pdf tutorial that you can download. It shows step-by-step how to make crepe flowers (includes images). Just click the banner to the right to grab a copy for yourself.

Paper fortune teller An elaborately decorated fortune teller. A fortune teller (also called a cootie catcher,[1][2] chatterbox,[3] salt cellar,[4][5] or whirlybird[3]) is a form of origami used in children's fortune-telling games. A player asks a question, and the fortune teller operator answers using an algorithm to manipulate the fortune teller's shape. Questions, answers, colors or numbers may be written on the fortune teller. Construction[edit] Sparkle Kusudama (Design by Tadashmi Mori) Season's Greetings Everyone! Compliments of the Season to all of you! I have made it a point to have an Origami Star as my Christmas Tree Topper for the last couple of years and have continued with that for this year, too. The Shirt As with all these designs, try to start with a relatively clean, crisp bill. It will make it much easier. All folds should be sharply creased. It helps to go over the fold with a fingernail on a flat, hard surface. Start by folding the bill precisely in half lengthwise. (I prefer to fold in toward the front of the bill.

ORIGAMI MODULAR DIAGRAMS « EMBROIDERY & ORIGAMI VRML Models of Modular Origami – Progonos Consultoria Some of the modular polypolyhedra origami models created by Robert J.Lang. Clockwise from top left: Makalu, Gasherbrum, K2, Annapurna and Chomolungma How To Make Japanese Paper Dolls Last Sunday, I had a ball teaching the Brisbane Brown Owls group how to make "Ningyogami" - Japanese paper dolls. I think everyone was surpised at how easy they were to do. What you need * “Kimono” paper (I prefer Japanese Yuzen or chiyogami) about 5.5 x 12.5 cm * “Obi” and “collar” paper about 1.5 cm wide, the length doesn’t matter too much. You can use different papers for the obi and collar. * “Obi-jime” paper (again, I prefer Yuzen or chiyogami), narrower than the “Obi” paper.

homemade honeycombs! Continuing my late obsession with honeycomb decor I hoped to use a stash of them for an event last weekend and they ended up being my absolute favorite decor piece. I wanted miniature ones, which of course I couldn’t find, so I embarked on making them myself. They turned out to be such easy projects and the results are splendid! The best thing about them is once you have the process down they can be completely customized to whichever size, color or fullness you would like.

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