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The Clash

The Clash
The Clash's politicised lyrics, musical experimentation, promotion of DIY ethics and rebellious attitude had a far-reaching influence on rock, alternative rock in particular.[2] They became widely referred to as "The Only Band That Matters", originally a promotional slogan introduced by the group's record label, CBS. In January 2003, the band—including original drummer Terry Chimes—were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the Clash number 28 on their list of the 100 greatest artists of all time.[3] History[edit] Origins: 1974–76[edit] The act was still searching for a lead singer. "so I went out in the crowd which was fairly sparse. On 30 May, Rhodes and Levene met surreptitiously with Strummer after a 101'ers gig. Early gigs and the growing scene: 1976[edit] With Rhodes insisting that the band not perform live again until they were much tighter, the Clash rehearsed intensely over the following month. Punk outbreak and UK fame: 1977–79[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Clash

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Sex Pistols The Sex Pistols were an English punk rock band that formed in London in 1975. They were responsible for initiating the punk movement in the United Kingdom and inspiring many later punk and alternative rock musicians. Although their original career lasted just two-and-a-half years and produced only four singles and one studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols, they are regarded as one of the most influential acts in the history of popular music.[1][2] In January 1978, at the end of a turbulent tour of the United States, Rotten left the Sex Pistols and announced its break-up. Over the next several months, the three other band members recorded songs for McLaren's film version of the Sex Pistols' story, The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle. Vicious died of a heroin overdose in February 1979.

THE CLASH - SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO LYRICS Send "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" Ringtone to your Cell Darling you gotta let me know Should I stay or should I go? If you say that you are mine I'll be here 'til the end of time So you got to let know Should I stay or should I go? It's always tease, tease, tease You're happy when I'm on my knees One day is fine, the next it's black So if you want me off your back Well come on and let me know Should I stay or should I go? Should I stay or should I go now?

History of the punk subculture The history of the punk subculture involves the history of punk rock, ideology, fashion, visual art, literature, dance, and film. Since emerging in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia in the mid-1970s, the punk subculture has spread around the globe and evolved into a number of different forms. The history of punk plays important part in the history of subcultures in the 20th century. Two UK punks in the 1980s

The Damned The Damned are an English rock band formed in London in 1976.[2][3] They were the first punk rock band from the United Kingdom to release a single ("New Rose"),[4] an album (Damned Damned Damned),[5] to have a record on the UK music charts, and to tour the United States. The Damned later evolved into one of the forerunners of the gothic genre.[6] The Damned played their first gig at a free festival held in Croydon. Rude Boy (film) Rude Boy is a 1980 British film directed by Jack Hazan and David Mingay and filmed in 1978 and early 1979. The film, part fiction, part rockumentary, tells the story of Ray Gange, a Clash fan who leaves his job in a Soho sex shop to become a roadie for the band.[1][2][3] The film includes footage of The Clash at a Rock Against Racism concert at Victoria Park,[1] on their "On Parole" and "Sort It Out" tours,[4] and in the studio recording the album Give 'Em Enough Rope. The film was named after the rude boy subculture. The band became so disenchanted with the film, that by its release, they had Better Badges make badges stating 'I don't want Rude Boy Clash Film'.[5] The cast included (in alphabetical order):[2]

Oi! Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s.[1] The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youth. [2][3] History[edit] The prevalent ideology of the original Oi! movement was a rough brand of working-class rebellion. THE CLASH - LONDON CALLING LYRICS Send "London Calling" Ringtone to your Cell London calling to the faraway towns Now war is declared, and battle come down London calling to the underworld Come out of the cupboard, you boys and girls London calling, now don't look to us Phoney Beatlemania has bitten the dust London calling, see we ain't got no swing 'Cept for the ring of that truncheon thing [Chorus 1:] The ice age is coming, the sun's zooming in Meltdown expected, the wheat is growing thin Engines stop running, but I have no fear 'Cause London is drowning, and I live by the river London calling to the imitation zone Forget it, brother, you can go it alone London calling to the zombies of death Quit holding out, and draw another breath London calling, and I don't wanna shout But while we were talking, I saw you nodding out London calling, see we ain't got no high Except for that one with the yellowy eyes

Ska Etymology[edit] There are different theories about the origins of the word ska. Ernest Ranglin claimed that the term was coined by musicians to refer to the "skat! skat! skat!" Ray Gange Rude Boy[edit] Before starring in Rude Boy, Ray Gange worked in a record shop in Soho, London, England. Gange knew of The Clash and was friends with Joe Strummer. The two met in a pub in Putney at a time when Strummer lived by Regent's Park. While working at the record shop, Gange met David Mingay and learned that he was planning to make a film on the band.

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