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How to Use Online Video in Your Classroom

How to Use Online Video in Your Classroom
It's one thing to talk about Mount St. Helens erupting in science class. It's another thing altogether to watch a video of the mountain's summit exploding into dust. Teachers all across the country are finding that judiciously chosen videos help students engage more deeply with the subject matter, and recall the information they've learned longer. "A lot of students these days expect information to be presented in a flashy, entertaining way, so videos can help draw them in," says Larry Sanger, executive director of WatchKnowLearn, a site that collects education-related videos. High school student Patrick Greaney still remembers a photosynthesis video he watched in class at Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School, in Haverhill, Massachusetts, that featured a catchy tune. Your YouTube Primer Though YouTube is blocked in many classrooms because of inappropriate materials on the site, there are many valuable videos that do further learning. First, register with YouTube.

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Education videos: Ten ways to use them well Why use video resources? In 1983 Howard Gardner proposed the theory of multiple intelligences. The idea has developed into a general understanding that students learn in different ways. Some learn best through listening; some by touching and others need visual stimuli, e.g. video resources. Over the years the theory has come under scrutiny by many. What is Interactive Teaching The first thing to realize about interactive teaching is that it is NOT something new or mysterious. If you are a teacher and you ask questions in class, assign and check homework, or hold class or group discussions, then you already teach interactively. Basically then (in my book), interactive teaching is just giving students something to do, getting back what they have done, and then assimilating it yourself, so that you can decide what would be best to do next. But, almost all teachers do these things, so is there more to it?

5 Examples of Interactive Teaching Styles Teaching involves an opened-minded plan for helping students meet and exceed educational goals. Teaching styles may differ from teacher to teacher, class to class and school to school. Yet every teaching objective must include a structured but flexible process for student advancement.

Pedagogical benefits of video for teaching and learning There are many benefits to using video in education as shown in several decades of research. Salman Khan in 'Let's use video to reinvent education' (20 mins) describes the transformative way video can impact on teaching and learning and encourages teachers to consider the flipped classroom model where learners can digest lecture content at their pace and explore content more deeply during class time. See The Art of Educational videos by Macquarie University for the breadth of approaches to making effective videos. Facilitating thinking and problem solving Shepard and Cooper (1982) and Mayer and Gallini (1990) made the connection between visual clues, the memory process, and the recall of new knowledge.

30 Superb Examples of Infographic Maps As you search the web you’ll come across a wide range of interactive and graphical maps. Deciding when, where and how to integrate or display a map on your site is the first step, the second should be what technology and illustrations to use. If you’re all about interaction, JQuery, Ajax, or Flash are all effective technologies that hold their own ground. Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques In 1990, after seven years of teaching at Harvard, Eric Mazur, now Balkanski professor of physics and applied physics, was delivering clear, polished lectures and demonstrations and getting high student evaluations for his introductory Physics 11 course, populated mainly by premed and engineering students who were successfully solving complicated problems. Then he discovered that his success as a teacher “was a complete illusion, a house of cards.” The epiphany came via an article in the American Journal of Physics by Arizona State professor David Hestenes. He had devised a very simple test, couched in everyday language, to check students’ understanding of one of the most fundamental concepts of physics—force—and had administered it to thousands of undergraduates in the southwestern United States. Mazur tried the test on his own students.

Benefits for Teachers using educational video to teach in a Classroom Teachers Using subtitled video as a teaching aid in the classroom gain many benefits including greater student interest and improved reading and literacy skills. There is substantial research promoting the use of video in the classroom as a dynamic resource for supporting curricula. According to a recent teacher survey, 94% of classroom teachers have effectively used video during the course of the last academic year. And most teachers were using it frequently - on average, once per week. But why?. As educators, our aim is to get students energized and engaged in the hands-on learning process, and video is clearly an instructional medium that is compelling and generates a much greater amount of interest and enjoyment than the more traditional printed material.

Teacher to Teacher: Critical Thinking in the College Classroom This web site provides personal, practical, and published materials collected to help you cultivate critical thinking skills in your students, especially first-year students. How these materials are organized These materials are contained in 14 modules--ten focused on specific critical thinking skills, and four on specific teaching methods. These modules are then categorized using Halpern's (2003) framework for teaching critical thinking skills across disciplines. Center for Teaching and Learning Active learning requires students to participate in class, as opposed to sitting and listening quietly. Strategies include, but are not limited to, brief question-and-answer sessions, discussion integrated into the lecture, impromptu writing assignments, hands-on activities and experiential learning events. As you think of integrating active learning strategies into your course, consider ways to set clear expectations, design effective evaluation strategies and provide helpful feedback. “Start classes with a puzzle to be solved or a mystery to be understood. Behind all of the window-dressing, this is what we are really doing when we create strong active learning modules.”Ben Wiggins, Course Coordinator, Biology

Masterpiece Theatre Introduction Why Study Film in the Classroom? Anyone who has ever watched a movie with a classroom full of teenagers knows that students are comfortable with film and understand its power. By high school, they have watched thousands of movies and television shows and unconsciously understand the basic tools and conventions of the medium. 46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom Infographics are interesting–a mash of (hopefully) easily-consumed visuals (so, symbols, shapes, and images) and added relevant character-based data (so, numbers, words, and brief sentences). The learning application for them is clear, with many academic standards–including the Common Core standards–requiring teachers to use a variety of media forms, charts, and other data for both information reading as well as general fluency. It’s curious they haven’t really “caught on” in schools considering how well they bridge both the old-form textbook habit of cramming tons of information into a small space, while also neatly overlapping with the dynamic and digital world.

Interactive Learning - Stanford Medicine Interactive Learning Initiatives What does this mean for faculty and students? The boundaries between teacher and student become less defined in the context of interactive learning. Faculty and other educators are challenged to transition from being “the sage on stage” to the “guide on side,” while students are challenged to participate more actively in their education. View FAQ » Medical education is at a tipping point of a major transformation. A number of factors -- including a greater understanding of how people learn -- are focusing this shift on the pedagogy of interactive learning. Role of Animation in Student's Learning About ETR Community EdTechReview (ETR) is a community of and for everyone involved in education technology to connect and collaborate both online and offline to discover, learn, utilize and share about the best ways technology can improve learning, teaching, and leading in the 21st century. EdTechReview spreads awareness on education technology and its role in 21st century education through best research and practices of using technology in education, and by facilitating events, training, professional development, and consultation in its adoption and implementation.