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Building a Raspberry Pi Robot and Controlling it with Scratch

Building a Raspberry Pi Robot and Controlling it with Scratch
Happy New Year everyone! Things have been a bit quiet on this blog due to the Christmas rush, and the fact that we’ve been spending time on product development (more on that in a future post). But here at last is the 3rd and final post in our series on the Raspberry Pi robot we […] Welcome to the second part of our series of posts, describing the workshop we ran at the recent Digimakers event at @Bristol. In the last post we described the outline of the workshop and looked at the hardware of the Raspberry Pi robot that we built for the event. In this post we describe the […] Last weekend we ran a workshop at the Digimakers event at @Bristol where we taught people how to program a Raspberry Pi robot with the Scratch programming language. We had a great response to a recent blog post we wrote, describing how to build a Raspberry Pi robot that you can drive around using a tablet, smartphone or PC. Update: This post is now out of date as we’ve released a new version of the software.

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Using a camera with Scratch on the Raspberry Pi I needed camera control with Scratch on the Raspberry Pi for a primary school aerial photography project. I added a new python extension for Simon’s ScratchGPIO that allows either the Raspberry Pi camera or a regular USB webcam to be used with Scratch. Follow Simon’s instructions for installing over on his site. Control your home appliances from the web – using a Raspberry pi Prologue I recently moved in a new apartment in which the living room lights could be controlled with a remote. Having already played with IR signals in order to incorporate remote control to some of my projects I knew that I would probably be able to emulate the signals sent by the original remote and thus operate the lights of my living room from a web based application. My first reflex was to think of using an Arduino with a wifi/ethernet shield. I could have used the ever usefull aRest library in order to build a REST api on the microcontroller.

scratch – Shall We Learn You never know what will happen next in life. One lazy afternoon, when I was enjoying my afternoon tea, two funny yellow birds showed up at my door. They introduced themselves as Tweet and Mini Tweet. Raspberry Pi Scratch Robot I found an application for the Raspberry in my classroom! With the endless possibilities of the Raspberry Pi in education, it is difficult to focus on one application. This is my attempt to document a focused application. I am sure this idea will branch out into other ideas or supplemental ideas will follow.

Raspberry Pi Bluetooth LE Controller for WS2812B (NeoPixels) - All Bluetooth Low Energy (aka BLE/Bluetooth 4.0/Bluetooth Smart) is the most recent incarnation of Bluetooth technology developed by the Bluetooth SIG (the organization that maintains the specification). This communication protocol is designed for applications where data needs to be transferred in small amounts at relatively low speed while consuming low amounts of power (e.g., heart rate monitor, step counter, wireless keyboard). This latest version of the protocol is not compatible with its predecessor (Bluetooth classic), as an upside, long gone are the days where pairing devices was necessary! The goal of this Instructable is to demonstrate how you can setup your Raspberry Pi to control RGB LEDs from a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) device nearby. Specifically, we'll be using the RFduino microcontroller, which has a built-in BLE module. We'll easily program the microcontroller to listen to messages sent by the Pi and control the LED color accordingly.

Creative Computing This guide was developed by members of the ScratchEd research team at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: Christan Balch, Michelle Chung, and Karen Brennan. We encourage you to use as much or as little of the guide as you like, to design new activities, and to remix the included activities. No matter your prior experience or expertise, we think of every educator as a co-designer of the Creative Computing experience. Hardware That Can Connect to Scratch Scratch can connect to some real world hardware. Some of the features are natively built in, while some are added through an extension or modification. Hardware Scratch can Connect to

Amazon Dash Button Lamp Control - All Material List: 1.Raspberry Pi-I would recommend using the new Raspberry Pi 2 or you could use the B/B+.You will also need the basics for it such as a mouse,keyboard, power supply, and display. 2.Amazon Dash Button-Any product button will do, just make sure to not set it up when you get it. 3.PowerSwitch Tail II-This is used by the Raspberry Pi to turn on and off any AC electronic device. 4.SD Card-You will need to install a fresh copy of Raspbian onto it. Make sure that it is 4GB or more.

Running Minecraft on a Raspberry Pi Minecraft is a hugely popular game that runs on PC, Xbox, PlayStation, and even smartphones. It's the best-selling PC game of all time and has become a worldwide sensation with obsessive players around the world, a large online community, and a vast array of merchandise. Many people enjoy building complicated structures and even creating their own interactive systems using only the mechanics of the game. The free Raspberry Pi version of the game is the only one that comes with a programming interface, allowing players write code and manipulate the world around them. It's based on Minecraft Pocket Edition for Android, and a Python API is provided.

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