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BBC Radio 4 - Mind Changers, Carol Dweck and Growth Mindset

BBC Radio 4 - Mind Changers, Carol Dweck and Growth Mindset
Claudia Hammond presents the history of psychology series which examines the work of the people who have changed our understanding of the human mind. This week she interviews Carol Dweck, who identified that individuals tend towards a fixed or a growth mindset regarding what they can learn and achieve. She also showed that a fixed mindset can be changed, and that once people adopt a growth mindset, they can achieve more. Claudia visits a UK primary school where growth mindset is part of the curriculum, and sees how children who don't like maths soon change their attitude at a summer camp in California, once they're shown that getting the wrong answer actually makes their brains grow more than getting the right answer. She hears more about Dweck and her work from colleagues Greg Walton and Jo Boaler at Stanford University, and executive head Dame Alison Peacock at the Wroxham Primary School. Producer: Marya Burgess.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b062jsn7

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Becoming a growth mindset school The idea of becoming a growth mindset school has been over a year in the making. Our Headteacher bought each member of SLT a copy of Mindset for Christmas, and it was the main agenda item at our annual senior team conference. Today I launched the idea of becoming a growth mindset school to all staff at our INSET day. This is the basis of the presentation I did. Our INSET session was for all staff – teaching, support, administrative, catering, site, network, technicians – everyone!

Growth Mindset Misconceptions and Missteps I have been working on developing a growth mindset culture in my school since October 2013, when I heard John Tomsett speak at TLT13. Over that time I have learned a lot about what works, what doesn’t work, and the stumbling blocks and misconceptions that still persist around growth mindset. I have also learned a lot more about the growth mindset, and refined my thinking about Dweck’s work. In this post I hope to summarise some of that learning. 6 ways to teach growth mindset from day one of school Imagine if your new class this fall was full of students who would: Be willing to try new thingsStick with hard tasks and not give upPush themselves to do their best work, not just what’s “good enough”Believe in themselves and their own ability to learn Here’s the great news–these are traits that we can help develop in our students by teaching them about how their brains work. Many students enter our classrooms believing they’re either smart or not smart, good at reading or math, or not good in those areas. This belief that our basic qualities like intelligence and talents can’t be changed is called a fixed mindset.

The scourge of motivational posters and the problem with pop psychology in the classroom Fifteen years ago I watched David Brent give this masterclass in motivation. This was before I started teaching, and when I entered the profession I was horrified to learn that this kind of stuff appeared to be embedded in so much of education from the Monday morning assembly to the top-down CPD session. I remember attending a leadership training day that featured one bit that was almost word for word, a carbon copy of the hotel role-play scene where Brent ‘fazes’ the trainer.

5 Strategies For Creating A Genius Mindset In Students How Can We Help Every Student Tap Their Inner Genius? by Zacc Dukowitz, Learnbop.com When we hear the word genius, certain people come immediately to mind—Albert Einstein in mathematics, or Warren Buffett in investing—but what exactly sets these people apart? It’s easy to simply shrug and say to ourselves, “Those people are just different. Developing a growth mindset in the classroom This article first appeared in Sec Ed magazine in April 2014. To read the original, click here. To read more of my monthly columns for Sec Ed, click here. To read more articles about the growth mindset, click here. Visit my blog | Browse my books | Follow me on Twitter | Like me on Facebook | Connect with me on LinkedIn | Download more posters | There’s a free info graphic version of this article.

The education fad that’s hurting our kids: What you need to know about “Growth Mindset” theory — and the harmful lessons it imparts One of the most popular ideas in education these days can be summarized in a single sentence (a fact that may help to account for its popularity). Here’s the sentence: Kids tend to fare better when they regard intelligence and other abilities not as fixed traits that they either have or lack, but as attributes that can be improved through effort. In a series of monographs over many years and in a book published in 2000, psychologist Carol Dweck used the label “incremental theory” to describe the self-fulfilling belief that one can become smarter. Rebranding it more catchily as the “growth mindset” allowed her to recycle the idea a few years later in a best-selling book for general readers.

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How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture Adilene Rodriguez admits she has always struggled with academics. Especially in middle school she hated getting up early, found her classes boring and didn’t really see where it was all going. When she started her freshman year at Arroyo High School in San Lorenzo, California, just south of Oakland, she was a shy student who rarely spoke up in class and had little confidence in herself as a scholar. Rodriguez is now a senior and her approach to school has changed dramatically over her high school career. She attributes her shift to her freshman science teacher, Jim Clark, who taught the class about growth mindset from the very beginning and backed up the discussion with action. “He would tell me, ‘You need to push yourself, that’s how you’re going to grow.

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