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Jonah Lehrer on How Creativity Works

Jonah Lehrer on How Creativity Works
by Maria Popova Inside the ‘seething cauldron of ideas,’ or what Bob Dylan has to do with the value of the synthesizer mind. In his 1878 book, Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits, Nietzsche observed: Artists have a vested interest in our believing in the flash of revelation, the so-called inspiration… shining down from heavens as a ray of grace. In reality, the imagination of the good artist or thinker produces continuously good, mediocre or bad things, but his judgment, trained and sharpened to a fine point, rejects, selects, connects… All great artists and thinkers are great workers, indefatigable not only in inventing, but also in rejecting, sifting, transforming, ordering.” Some 131 years later, Elizabeth Gilbert echoed that observation in her now-legendary TED talk. The origin, pursuit, and secret of creativity are a central fixation of the Idea Age. Lehrer writes in the introduction, echoing Nietzsche’s lament: How does one measure the imagination? Share on Tumblr

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5 Steps to Being More Creative [INFOGRAPHIC] Having trouble coming up with new ideas? Feel out of touch with your creative self? Don’t worry – the creative process is not out of your reach. By following these five steps you can learn new ways of thinking and add some unstructured structure to the way you create new ideas.

Why Boredom Is Good for Your Creativity Like most creatives, you probably have a low boredom threshold. You’re hardwired to pursue novelty and inspiration, and to run from admin and drudgery. Boredom is the enemy of creativity, to be avoided at all costs. Or is it? Consider these remarks by comedy writer Graham Linehan, in a recent interview for the Guardian: Jonah Lehrer: The man with the big ideas A rising star of popular science, who has opened up the laboratory to the everyday reader, takes on the question of creativity ©Dylan Coulter When two men meet each other for the first time, there is nothing quite so easy as talking about sports to establish a comfortable rapport.

How Do We Identify Good Ideas? I’ve always been fascinated by the failures of genius. Consider Bob Dylan. How did the same songwriter who produced Blood on the Tracks and Blonde on Blonde also conclude that Down in the Groove was worthy of release? Or what about Steve Jobs: What did he possibly see in the hockey puck mouse? Austin Kleon on Cultivating Creativity in the Digital Age by Maria Popova The genealogy of ideas, why everything is a remix, or what T.S. Eliot can teach us about creativity. UPDATE: Kleon’s Steal Like an Artist synthesizes his ideas on creativity and is absolutely fantastic. Austin Kleon is positively one of the most interesting people on the Internet. His Newspaper Blackout project is essentially a postmodern florilegium, using a black Sharpie to make art and poetry by redacting newspaper articles.

Why Creativity Matters More Than Passion for Entrepreneurs What is the most important quality of an entrepreneur? Many would argue it is passion -- an overwhelming love of what one is doing, and the drive and determination to see one's dreams realized. Others might say leadership -- the ability to bring a team of people together and guide them toward a common goal. But some believe that creativity — a boundless imagination that is constantly innovating and seeing the world through a different lens — is the ultimate key to business success. The Vital Link Between Emotions and Creativity in Photography I love photography. I love the idea of capturing a moment in time, an event, an abstract scene or just a snippet of life that would otherwise go unrecorded, only to be forgotten over time. I have no formal training, no gallery exhibitions, no commissions and not even a particularly large following on Flickr or any other social media.

Jonah Lehrer Resigns From New Yorker Amid Scandal It’s been a rough couple of months for the science Wunderkind. Jonah Lehrer resigned today from his post at the New Yorker after acknowledging that he fabricated quotes in his most recent book, Imagine. His publisher is pulling the e-book that contains the misquotations and is halting production of physical copies. Lehrer admitted that quotes that he had attributed to Bob Dylan “either did not exist, were unintentional misquotations, or represented improper combinations of previously existing quotes.” Jonah Lehrer, the educator who admitted he wasn’t too honest with his attributions.

3 Critical Insights Into Creativity From Jonah Lehrer's "Imagine" Designers spend a lot of time giving advice to each other. There has been a litany of books by designers for designers. There have been a few by business people on how design can benefit business. But there have not been many about the process of design and creativity at the most fundamental level of all--the human brain. How Creativity in Humor, Art, and Science Works: Arthur Koestler’s Theory of Bisociation by Maria Popova “The discoveries of yesterday are the truisms of tomorrow, because we can add to our knowledge but cannot subtract from it.” At a recent TED salon, New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff presented his theory of humor as “a conflict of synergies,” which reminded me of a wonderful concept from Arthur Koestler’s seminal 1964 anatomy of creativity, The Act Of Creation (public library).

study finds walking improves creativity Stanford Report, April 24, 2014 Stanford researchers found that walking boosts creative inspiration. They examined creativity levels of people while they walked versus while they sat. A person's creative output increased by an average of 60 percent when walking. By May Wong

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