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Tim Burton at the Museum of Modern Art

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Body Painting by Craig Tracy | Pondly - StumbleUpon Article by James Pond I am the owner of Pondly.com / art lover / electrical engineer / software developer / MBA in e-business student. I blog for pleasure and love to share my Internet findings. Web site: Body painting is form of art in which Craig Tracy excels. Website You may want to check out Body Painting by Barbara Pichiecchio and Alessio Frederico Sample: Do you want more visual fun? You might also like

Sagaki Keita | Colossal - StumbleUpon (click images for detail) Artist Sagaki Keita was born in 1984 and lives and works in Tokyo. His densely composited pen and ink illustrations contain thousands of whimsical characters that are drawn almost completely improvised. Satiric Artworks by Pawel Kuczynski | Pondly - StumbleUpon Article by James Pond I am the owner of Pondly.com / art lover / electrical engineer / software developer / MBA in e-business student. I blog for pleasure and love to share my Internet findings. Incredible and creative work by the Polish Artist. Website Do you want more visual fun?

Painting Intoxicated at 100 MPH (10 pieces) - My Modern Metropolis - StumbleUpon It's almost as if Alexandra Pacula paints what she sees while driving drunk at 100 mph. "My work investigates a world of visual intoxication; it captures moments of enchantment, which are associated with urban nightlife," says the New York-based artist born in Poland. "I am fascinated by the ambiance of the city at night and its seductive qualities. The breathtaking turbulence of speeding vehicles and hasty pedestrians evoke feelings of wonder and disorientation. The vibrant lights become a magical landscape with enticing opportunities and promises of fulfillment." Pacula paints with oil to recreate the feeling of dizziness and confusion. "I suggest motion in order to slow down the scene and capture the fleeting moments, which tend to be forgotten," she says. Alexandra Pacula's websiteMore Amazing Oil Painting Posts:Hyper-Realistic Acrylic Body PaintingFine Art - Rob HefferanMatthew Curry - Modern Abstract ArtBold, Sexy Knife Work - Françoise Nielly: Paris

Wicked Samurai Skateboarders (12 total) - My Modern Metropolis - StumbleUpon Inspired by a recent trip to Kyoto, Japan, San Francisco based painter Ferris Plock decided to cleverly mashup samurais and skateboarders in his new series, Rest for the Wicked. This new collection embodies the artist's trademark character-based works along with a Ukiyo-e inspired sensibility. Ukiyo-e, or Japanese woodblock prints, is one of the most universally known of all Japanese arts. Produced between the 17th and the 20th centuries, ukiyo-e translates to "floating world" in English and often featured images of a world of transient pleasures and freedom, like in theatre, pleasure quarters and travel. Fock used a variety of media such as acrylic, gouache, gold leaf, and spray paint on wood panel to create his art. The Shooting Gallery

Wicked Samurais in Cartoon Disguises - My Modern Metropolis - StumbleUpon Artist Ferris Plock is back at the Shooting Gallery in San Francisco but this time he's mashing up samurais not with skateboarders but with cartoons characters we all know and love. Why are Daffy, Snoopy and and Hello Kitty wearing colorful samurai gear? They're not! It's actually those wicked samurais again dressed up in disguise! Just For One Day is the name of Plock's new show which fuses his traditional Japanese style with a rebellious sensibility. "I had a lot of fun creating these paintings and a lot of memories and personal stories are wrapped up in each of these paintings," Plock told Shooting Gallery in a recent interview.

Markers and acrylic paint by Minjae Lee - ego-alterego.com - StumbleUpon Minjae Lee is a 20 year old illustrator and painter from Korea. His Favorite mediums are markers and acrylic paint. Minjae Lee: website Via: vectroave.com Extraordinary Brush-Less Paintings - My Modern Metropolis - StumbleUpon Amy Shackleton, who is only 25-years-old, is a unique artist. While her paintings use tons and tons of paint, she doesn't use paintbrushes to create them! Rather, she squeezes paint onto canvases and then allows the paint to naturally drip. She then rotates the canvas to control the direction of the drips, making her paintings appear natural yet controlled. The subjects of many of her paintings are also quite interesting. We were so intrigued by her process that we decided to ask Amy some questions. When did you first know that you wanted to become a professional artist? As a child, I taught myself the basics by drawing and sketching in my free time. Your process is so unique. I worked on unstretched canvas at first, so the surface was flexible and I could move it whichever way I wanted. How long does each piece take from start to finish? How do you stay creative? At first I looked to other artists for inspiration to try and find out what my style was. What's next in store for you?

Ian Francis Interview This England based artist had his first U.S. solo show @BLK/MRKT in 2007 and sold it out. We've been meaning to interview him for awhile. Ian Francis was born in 1979 in Bristol, England, and graduated from the University of the West of England with a degree in Illustration. His work concentrates on the particulars of modern experiences — things like television, world events, celebrities, and day-to-day living. He held his first US solo show at BLK/MRKT in 2007. Describe your process of creating a new piece. I spend a lot of time watching TV/films, reading books and looking around the internet... How would you describe your style? I normally describe what I do as mixed media painting... the idea is to get different kinds of marks to work off of each other - so sometimes I'll paint/draw fairly accurately, then work quite loosely on a section, then break up elements of print on another section. What brought you to Bristol? What do you love most about it? When are you the most productive? Music?

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