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Starting a School Makerspace from Scratch

Starting a School Makerspace from Scratch
With the National Week of Making behind us, you might be ready to start a makerspace in your school -- but not know where to start. Will purchasing a costly 3D printer and the latest robotics kit ensure learning and maker success? What are some steps to starting a successful makerspace from scratch? Step 1: Immerse Yourself in Maker Education Before you can build your own community of makers, you need to join one! Immerse yourself in makerspaces by joining a summer maker camp like Exploratorium's Tinkering Fundamentals or the virtual Camp Google for cheap and easy STEM ideas, but most importantly: make stuff! Step 2: Get Others Involved Start a steering committee for your makerspace by involving interested teachers and students. If you can, reach out to the community and get parents and community members involved. Step 3: Purchasing Makerspace Resources Here are three guidelines: What purchases will give you the most bang for your buck? Step 4: Building a Community of Makers

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/starting-school-makerspace-from-scratch-colleen-graves

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8 Design Steps for an Academic Makerspace Hands-on Learning 8 Design Steps for an Academic Makerspace If you build it, will they come? That is the question many schools have about finding room on campus for a "makerspace." A Librarian’s Guide to OER in the Maker Space Dynamic, living, breathing, current, personalized, adaptive, engaging, creative, cutting-edge, and current are just some of the words that have been used to describe the open educational resources (OER) movement. The U.S. Department of Education recently expanded its efforts to increase schools’ access to high-quality, openly licensed learning resources, giving educators more access to technology to personalize learning for their students. What are OER? OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits sharing, accessing, repurposing—including for commercial purposes—and collaborating with others. They include educational materials, such as lesson plans, games, textbooks, tests, audio, and video.

MakerSpaces: new tradition in context Generally, a MakerSpace is considered a place where informal, collaborative learning and discovery take place through hands on creation, via use of any combination of art and technology. MakerSpaces facilitate both analog (low-tech) and digital (high tech) creation. Teen library programming and services that include use of a MakerSpace or equipment associated with a MakerSpace provide 21st century skills that contribute to new forms of literacy which include exposure to various types of technology, problem solving and collaboration skills. Much of the literature on the maker movement offers practical guides for design and implementation of MakerSpaces, including tools, technology, projects, and kits, as well as advice for libraries in the beginning stages of planning the physical layout of a MakerSpace. Why do libraries have MakerSpaces for teens?

uTEC Maker Model he uTEC Maker Model visualizes the developmental stages of creativity from individuals and groups as they develop from passively using a system or process to the ultimate phase of creativity and invention. As illustrated in the model below, there arefour levels of expertise. A Makerspace participant begins at the Using level. A User enjoys engaging in an activity to sample something new. Resources for Creating a Makerspace Are you ready to create your own Makerspace? Would you like some help? The Makerspace Lab website is designed to provide teachers, technology directors, librarians, hacker space designer and community leaders with information on how to make a Makerspace.

Maker Education Initiative The Maker Education Initiative invites you to apply to become a Maker Corps Member. Maker Corps Members are maker-in-residences at Host Sites that are an inclusive spectrum of youth-serving organizations and programs. The Maker Certificate Program, based out of Sonoma State University, provides a professional development opportunity for educators looking to create and develop an environment of making in and outside of traditional classroom settings. Note: Educator Innovator partners the Afterschool Alliance, the National Writing Project, Digital Is, Edutopia, YALSA and the Maker Education Initiative are all involved in this year’s Digital Learning Day On February 5, thousands of educators will take part in the third annual Digital Learning Day, a nationwide celebration of common-sense, effective applications of digital learning that […]

A Thematic Approach to Planning Your Maker Space When schools talk about the Maker Movement and creating maker spaces, they often focus their initial thinking on purchasing the tools and materials. This resource-driven approach can create a buzz in your school for some time; however, that excitement will inevitably fade. While resources are an important part of any maker space, taking a thematic planning approach is much more effective.

How to Run an AWESOME After-school Makers Club When I first started up my makerspace at Stewart, I knew that getting students in there after school would be the ideal time to really dive deep into projects and develop a community of makers. During those first six months, my school didn’t have afterschool clubs but was piloting during school clubs with 6th graders, so we had a small but mighty K’nex Club where we had tons of fun. This gave me a chance to experiment with what running a club was like, and it gave me a lot of ideas for how an afterschool club could work. The next school year, my school started supporting afterschool clubs. The (Latecomer) Beginner's Guide To Minecraft Minecraft first came out in 2009; but just a few weeks ago it debuted on the current console generation. What makes this game endure, 5 years later – with over 15 million licensed players on the PC/Mac alone? It’s awesome, that’s what. If you’re late to the party though, don’t worry – this extensive beginner’s guide has you covered.

Create a school makerspace in 3 simple steps As maker education gains steam, many educators are looking for ways to incorporate making and tinkering into their schools and classrooms — often on a shoestring budget. “Kids are saying they want to learn more about technology and science, but they also want to experience it creatively and use it personally,” said Dale Dougherty, founder of Make Media, which produces Maker Faire and Make Magazine. He’ll address how educators can deliver these types of experimental learning experiences during ISTE 2014’s EdTekTalks, a provocative series of mini-keynotes from thought leaders beyond the world of ed tech. “One of the ways we can do that is create more makerspaces for kids.

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