background preloader

Exploring Earth Visualizations

Exploring Earth Visualizations

http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/navigation/visualization.cfm

Related:  Plate TectonicsEarth ScienceTerm S

Wegener's Puzzling Evidence Exercise (6th Grade) Although Alfred Wegener was not the first to suggest that continents have moved about the Earth, his presentation of carefully compiled evidence for continental drift inspired decades of scientific debate. Wegener's evidence, in concert with compelling evidence provided by post World War II technology, eventually led to universal acceptance of the theory of Plate Tectonics in the scientific community. The following files are needed for this exercise and can be downloaded in pdf format (Teacher Overview, (For Teachers) Wegener's Key to Continental Positions for grade 6, Student Puzzle Pieces, Key to Wegener's Evidence sheet, and Student Map of the World Today).

PhET Lab: Plate Tectonics Topics Plate Tectonics Crust Lithosphere Mantle Density Buoyancy Earth Science Description Visual Dictionary Online > EARTH Various sciences that study the Earth, either as a physical entity, or as a living environment for plants, animals and human beings. Science whose subject is the history, structure and evolution of the terrestrial globe. The Earth is formed of three concentric layers: the core, the mantle and the crust; these are separated by transition zones called discontinuities.

January 6, 1912: Continental Drift! “Beautiful is what we see, More beautiful is what we understand, Most beautiful is what we do not comprehend.” Anatomist and self-educated geologist Nicolaus Steno, 1673 January 6, 1912 the German meteorologist Alfred Wegener presented in a lecture entitled “Die Heraushebung der Großformen der Erdrinde (Kontinente und Ozeane) auf geophysikalischer Grundlage” (The uprising of large features of earth’s crust (Continents and Oceans) on geophysical basis) for the first time his hypothesis of the ancient supercontinent Pangaea, from which all modern continents split apart. Virtual Labs The links on this page are all VIRTUAL LABS offered by the Glencoe textbook company. These labs give the students the adventure of laboratory experimentation without costly supplies, worrisome environmental and safety issues, or time-consuming clean up. They are from all different areas of science: Biology, Physics, Genetics, Earth Science, Physical Science, and Chemistry.

Pictures, Photos of Geology and Earth Science Geology and Earth Science Images Below are 15 different categories of Earth Science, each linked to its own gallery of an additional 10-20 or so photographs that are available for free download. Below those categories are some additional links to photos of the Death Valley region and the San Andreas fault zone. Click on any photo below to view images in that category or click here to search geology photos by keyword. Other Images Click here for Geology of Death Valley National Park Photos. Click here for photos of the Amargosa Valley, California.

Cracking Up: Plate Tectonics, Volcanism, and the Structure of the Earth Model the structural layers of the Earth, investigate the data that led to the theory of plate tectonics, and discover the relationship between plate tectonics and earthquakes, volcanos, and mountains, through data analysis and hands-on activities. Preliminary Concepts Igneous: this rocks form as liquid magma or lava cools; the crystals that form are interlocking Metamorphic: this rock forms from existing (not molten) rocks under heat and/or pressure; the crystals are interlocking and have a preferred orientation Sedimentary: rocks are cemented together; not formed from crystals but from pieces or precipitants One common misconception is that layered rocks are always sedimentary; in fact, many metamorphic rocks are layered, and even a few igneous rocks can have layers. Activities Modeling Rock Processes

Cascades Volcano Observatory Why Study Cascade Volcanoes? Cascade Range Active volcanoes dominate the skyline of the Pacific Northwest. The familiar snow-clad peaks of the Cascade Range are part of a 1,300 km (800 mi) chain of volcanoes, which extends from northern California to southern British Columbia. The volcanoes are the result of the slow slide of dense oceanic crust as it sinks beneath North America (subduction), which releases water and melts overlying rock. This rich volcanic zone contains the well-known landmark volcanoes and approximately 2,900 other known volcanic features ranging from small cinder cones to substantial shield volcanoes. Cascade volcanoes have erupted in the recent past and will erupt again.

Related:  random pics 1AnimationerINTERESTING SITES TO CHECK