background preloader

UK Government Web Archive

UK Government Web Archive

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/webarchive/

netarchive.dk Since 2005 the collection and preservation of the Danish part of the internet is included in the Danish Legal Deposit Law. The task is undertaken by the two legal deposit libraries in Denmark, State and University Library and The Royal Library. Netarchive.dk cannot be accessed by the general public.The archive is only accessible to researchers who have requested and been granted special permission to use the collection for specific research purposes. This website, Netarkivet.dk, is designed to inform researchers, website owners, and other interested parties about the Danish web archive. For the time being most of the website is in Danish.

Swiss National Library NL -FAQs on web archiving WHY CAN'T I VIEW THE ARCHIVED WEBSITE FROM HOME?The availability of the websites is governed by the law. Websites are subject to copyright and can only be consulted in the public rooms of the Swiss National Library. Dreamers and Dissenters How do people respond to the world they live in? When they disagree or dream of change, do they act within society's rules or against them? This site introduces some of the visionaries, dissenters and rule breakers of past centuries. Through a selection of sources from the British Library's collection, you can learn how these people have presented themselves and how they have been represented by others.

NLA Australian Government Web Archive The Australian Government Web Archive (AGWA) is a web archiving initiative of the National Library of Australia which complements the Library's long established PANDORA Archive. The AGWA public interface was released in March 2014. The AGWA is a collection of Commonwealth Government websites. Initially content collected specifically for the collection commenced in June 2011. However earlier content sourced from other web archiving activities is progressively being added (see 'Latest updates' below). Campaign for Abolition 2007 marks the 200th anniversary of the abolition of British involvement in the slave trade. However, the campaign which led to this abolition began as early as 1787. This resource allows you to explore a range of sources from the entire campaign - you will be able to look at minutes from the meetings of the Abolition Committee and to examine first hand, eye witness accounts of slavery. It will become clear that the issues of equality, justice and tolerance raised and explored by the resources are just as relevant today as they were two centuries ago. You might feel that the need for campaigns is also just as great. This resource therefore also outlines a series of activities that investigate what made the Abolition campaign so successful and what still makes a successful campaign today.

Category:Online archives Problems donating? | Other ways to give | Frequently asked questions | By donating, you are agreeing to our donor privacy policy. The Wikimedia Foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization.By donating, you are agreeing to our donor privacy policy and to sharing your information with the Wikimedia Foundation and its service providers in the U.S. and elsewhere. Asians in Britain The establishment of the East India Company in 1600 began a complex relationship between Britain and India that would mark major shifts in the culture and history of both nations. This trading relationship, combined with Britain’s long imperial rule in India, led to far reaching changes and a steady migration of Asians from all walks of life to Britain. With a focus on the period 1858–1950, explore this history through contemporary accounts, photographs, letters, newspapers and pamphlets – all evidence of the rich and diverse contributions Asians have made to British life and society. The establishment of the East India Company in 1600 began a complex relationship between Britain and India that would mark major shifts in the culture and history of both nations. This trading relationship, combined with Britain’s long imperial rule in India, led to far reaching changes and a steady migration of Asians from all walks of life to Britain.

Web archiving Web archiving is the process of collecting portions of the World Wide Web to ensure the information is preserved in an archive for future researchers, historians, and the public.[1] Web archivists typically employ web crawlers for automated capture due to the massive size and amount of information on the Web. The largest web archiving organization based on a bulk crawling approach is the Internet Archive which strives to maintain an archive of the entire Web. The International Web Archiving Workshop (IWAW), begun in 2001, has provided a platform to share experiences and exchange ideas. Category:Photo archives Problems donating? | Other ways to give | Frequently asked questions | By donating, you are agreeing to our donor privacy policy. The Wikimedia Foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization.By donating, you are agreeing to our donor privacy policy and to sharing your information with the Wikimedia Foundation and its service providers in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Archive site In web archiving, an archive site is a website that stores information on, or the actual, webpages from the past for anyone to view. Common techniques[edit] Two common techniques for archiving web sites are using a web crawler or soliciting user submissions: Using a web crawler: By using a web crawler (e.g., the Internet Archive) the service will not depend on an active community for its content, and thereby can build a larger database faster. This can result in the community's growing larger as well.

Related: