background preloader

ISTE 2015: Takeaway Tips for a Library Maker Space

ISTE 2015: Takeaway Tips for a Library Maker Space
Maker station at the ISTE Librarians Digital Age Playground at the 2015 ISTE conference in Philadelphia. The maker movement was front and center at the 2015 ISTE conference—and that’s a good thing for me. After following maker initiatives with great interest for some time now, I have the opportunity to design a maker space this year for 6th–12th grade students at my school, Worcester (MA) Academy. A search of this year’s program at ISTE, held June 28 to July 1 in Philadelphia, using the term “constructivist learning/maker movement” resulted in 67 related sessions. The ISTE Librarians Network hosted a maker station at their Digital Age Playground and convened a panel on library maker spaces, featuring elementary and middle school librarians, a school administrator, and the coordinator of a public library maker initiative. Vendors and exhibitors demonstrated tools, lessons, and ideas for maker spaces. Problem solving, problem solving, problem solving A big budget is not necessary

http://www.slj.com/2015/07/technology/iste-2015-takeaway-tips-for-a-library-maker-space-iste-2015/

Related:  MakerspacesMakerSpacesMakerspacesMaker Spaces

Makerspaces in the Media Center For most people when they hear the words location, location, location they think real estate. I think of school library media centers. In almost all schools the media center occupies the largest amount of real estate on the campus. And just like a piece of real estate, there should be flexibility in the staging, products, services, and use of the space. This place, above all others, should be a dynamic space that allows for self expression, exploration, discovery, curiosity, creativity, inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving. It Starts With the Look and Feel of the Space

Why the Maker Movement Should Be Here to Stay I recently had the opportunity to take part in a two-day professional development session with the Children’s Museum Makeshop in collaboration with Kickstarter. Here there were a variety of different of teachers and administrators who had varying levels of experience with making in education. The commonality: all teachers and administrators wanted to incorporate making into their instruction in a more meaningful way. Led by Teresa DeFlitch, we were engaged in a take-apart activity.

Evolution of a Maker Space, From “Monstie Stuffie” Projects to a Giant Catapult littleBits activities at the circulation desk in Colleen Graves’s school library. Two years ago, I was asked to write an article for Knowledge Quest about how I created a maker space at Lamar Middle School in Flower Mound, TX. That first year of programming is so different from what I do now that I thought it pertinent to chart how our maker programming (#Makered) has evolved. During my first year as a librarian in 2012–13 my Teen Advisory Board (TAB) helped me redecorate a small office located behind our circulation desk. My director bought us some reading rockers, chalkboard paint, rain gutters, and 25 licenses for Minecraft. Starting off: “Take and Make” wall and workshops Lego in libraries This page aims to bring together a whole ton of information on lego in libraries in one place. Why? Because I love lego.

Creating School Library Makerspaces While there is no clear, single definition to the term makerspaces (Burke, 2013; Fontichiaro, as cited in Bell, 2015), there are commonalities existing in terms of features, functions, goals and activities that makerspaces provide. A makerspace is a place where people gather as communities to be innovative, create and collaborate, to share knowledge, tools and resources (Britton, 2012). Makerspaces have transpired from the maker movement which has been popularised by Make magazine and Maker Faire founder Dale Dougherty. These creative spaces emphasise the ‘do-it-yourself’ philosophy while promoting a richer engagement and curiosity within the Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths (STEAM) disciplines (Dougherty, 2013) and encourages students to pursue careers in these fields, but also to create their own jobs and industries (Peppler and Bender, 2013) that may not exist yet in a rapidly changing information and technological world.

8 Design Steps for an Academic Makerspace Hands-on Learning 8 Design Steps for an Academic Makerspace If you build it, will they come? DIY Hacks & How To's: The Pepper's Ghost Illusion Explore the Venturi Effect with a DIY Vacuum Pump Weld Two Salt Shakers to Make This Sleek Hourglass Use Raspberry Pi to Measure Broadband Speeds to Hold Your ISP Accountable Build a Minimalist Chair Out of Plywood ISTE 2015: Takeaway Tips for a Library Maker Space Maker station at the ISTE Librarians Digital Age Playground at the 2015 ISTE conference in Philadelphia. The maker movement was front and center at the 2015 ISTE conference—and that’s a good thing for me. After following maker initiatives with great interest for some time now, I have the opportunity to design a maker space this year for 6th–12th grade students at my school, Worcester (MA) Academy. A search of this year’s program at ISTE, held June 28 to July 1 in Philadelphia, using the term “constructivist learning/maker movement” resulted in 67 related sessions. The ISTE Librarians Network hosted a maker station at their Digital Age Playground and convened a panel on library maker spaces, featuring elementary and middle school librarians, a school administrator, and the coordinator of a public library maker initiative.

Related: