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XMLHttpRequest Level 1

XMLHttpRequest Level 1
Abstract The XMLHttpRequest specification defines an API that provides scripted client functionality for transferring data between a client and a server. Status of this Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. This document is published as a snapshot of the XMLHttpRequest Living Specification. If you wish to make comments regarding this document in a manner that is tracked by the W3C, please submit them via using our public bug database, or please send comments to public-webapps@w3.org (archived) with [XHR] at the start of the subject line. The W3C Web Applications Working Group is the W3C working group responsible for this specification's progress along the W3C Recommendation track. Publication as a Working Draft does not imply endorsement by the W3C Membership. Work on this specification is also done at the WHATWG. This document was produced by a group operating under the 5 February 2004 W3C Patent Policy. Table of Contents 1 Introduction Related:  From HTML1.0 to HTML5WEB TECHNOLOGY

Geolocation API Specification Abstract This specification defines an API that provides scripted access to geographical location information associated with the hosting device. Status of This Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. Other documents may supersede this document. This document has been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and is endorsed by the Director as a W3C Recommendation. By publishing this Recommendation, W3C expects that the functionality specified in this Geolocation API Recommendation will not be affected by changes to HTML5 or Web IDL as those specifications proceed to Recommendation. This document incorporates minor changes made against the Proposed Recommendation of 10 May 2012. Comments on the document should be sent to the Working Group's public mailing list public-geolocation@w3.org (subscribe, archives). Table of Contents 1 Conformance requirements 2 Introduction 3 Scope Geolocation The

Javascript Object Tree Favelet Looking for the drawings? They're over here, and my drawing blog is this way. Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 1.1 (Second Edition) W3C Recommendation 16 August 2011 This version: Latest version: Previous version: Public comments: www-svg@w3.org (archive) Editors: Erik Dahlström, Opera Software <ed@opera.com> Patrick Dengler, Microsoft Corporation <patd@microsoft.com> Anthony Grasso, Canon Inc. Chris Lilley, W3C <chris@w3.org> Cameron McCormack, Mozilla Corporation <cam@mcc.id.au> Doug Schepers, W3C <schepers@w3.org> Jonathan Watt, Mozilla Corporation <jwatt@jwatt.org> Jon Ferraiolo, ex Adobe Systems <jferrai@us.ibm.com> (Versions 1.0 and 1.1 First Edition; until 10 May 2006) 藤沢 淳 (FUJISAWA Jun), Canon Inc. Dean Jackson, ex W3C <dean@w3.org> (Version 1.1 First Edition; until February 2007) Please refer to the errata for this document, which may include some normative corrections. Copyright © 2011 W3C® (MIT, ERCIM, Keio), All Rights Reserved. Abstract Status of this document Comments on this Recommendation are welcome.

Selectors API Level 1 Abstract Selectors, which are widely used in CSS, are patterns that match against elements in a tree structure [SELECT][CSS21]. The Selectors API specification defines methods for retrieving Element nodes from the DOM by matching against a group of selectors. Status of this Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. The Web Applications (WebApps) Working Group has developed a comprehensive Selectors API test suite and has demonstrated interoperability of the features among implementations. Please send comments about this document to public-webapps@w3.org (public archive) with [selectors-api] in the subject. This document was developed by the Web Applications Working Group. This document has been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and is endorsed by the Director as a W3C Recommendation. This document was produced by a group operating under the 5 February 2004 W3C Patent Policy.

HTML Canvas 2D Context This Version: Latest Published Version: Previous Version: Editors: Rik Cabanier, Adobe Systems, Inc. Jatinder Mann, Microsoft Corporation Jay Munro, Microsoft Corporation Tom Wiltzius, Google, Inc. Ian Hickson, Google, Inc. Please check the errata for any errors or issues reported since publication. See also translations. Copyright © 2015 W3C® (MIT, ERCIM, Keio, Beihang). Abstract This specification defines the 2D Context for the HTML canvas element. Status of This Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. This is the specification for the 2D Context for the HTML canvas element, published by the HTML Working Group. If you wish to make comments regarding this document in a manner that is tracked by the W3C, please submit them via using our public issues list. Work on this specification is also done at the WHATWG. 2d ImageData

Memory leak patterns in JavaScript JavaScript is a powerful scripting language used to add dynamic content to Web pages. It is especially beneficial for everyday tasks such as password validation and creating dynamic menu components. While JavaScript is easy to learn and write, it is prone to memory leaks in certain browsers. In this introductory article we explain what causes memory leaks in JavaScript, demonstrate some of the common memory leak patterns to watch out for, and show you how to work around them. Note that the article assumes you are familiar with using JavaScript and DOM elements to develop Web applications. Memory leaks in JavaScript JavaScript is a garbage collected language, meaning that memory is allocated to objects upon their creation and reclaimed by the browser when there are no more references to them. Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox are two browsers that use reference counting to handle memory for DOM objects. What's wrong with circular references? Listing 1. Another memory leak pattern

WOFF File Format 1.0 1. Introduction This document specifies a simple compressed file format for fonts, designed primarily for use on the Web and known as WOFF (Web Open Font Format). Despite this name, WOFF should be regarded as a container format or "wrapper" for font data in already-existing formats rather than an actual font format in its own right. The WOFF format is a container for the table-based sfnt structure used in e.g. The structure and contents of decoded font data exactly match those of a well-formed input font file. Notational Conventions The all-uppercase key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC-2119]. This document includes sections of text that are called out as "Notes" and set off from the main text of the specification. 2. The primary purpose of the WOFF format is to package fonts linked to Web documents by means of CSS @font-face rules.

Network Communication API Abstract To enable Web applications to communicate using TCP this specification introduces the TCPSocket interface and a corresponding optional security model. Status of this Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. This document is a first editors' draft specification of the network API from the Web API group, part of the Rich Web Client Activity. This document is published to solicit comments from interested parties. This document was produced by a group operating under the 5 February 2004 W3C Patent Policy. Publication as a Working Draft does not imply endorsement by the W3C Membership. Table of Contents Introduction The TCPSocket interface enables a TCP connection from the client to the server from which the script was downloaded and executed from. This interface does not allow for raw access to the underlying network. Add an introduction to the client-side and server-side of using the direct connection APIs. Provide an example here The

Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 3.0 2nd Edition W3C Recommendation 10 April 2014 This version: Latest MathML 3 version: Latest MathML Recommendation: Previous versions: Editors' version: Editors: David Carlisle, NAG Patrick Ion, Mathematical Reviews, American Mathematical Society Robert Miner (deceased), Design Science, Inc. Principal Authors: Ron Ausbrooks, Stephen Buswell, David Carlisle, Giorgi Chavchanidze, Stéphane Dalmas, Stan Devitt, Angel Diaz, Sam Dooley, Roger Hunter, Patrick Ion, Michael Kohlhase, Azzeddine Lazrek, Paul Libbrecht, Bruce Miller, Robert Miner (deceased), Chris Rowley, Murray Sargent, Bruce Smith, Neil Soiffer, Robert Sutor, Stephen Watt Please refer to the errata for this document, which may include some normative corrections. See also translations. Abstract Status of this Document

Understanding MVC And MVP (For JavaScript And Backbone Developers) Last updated: 16th Jan, 2012. Before exploring any JavaScript frameworks that assist in structuring applications, it can be useful to gain a basic understanding of architectural design patterns. Design patterns are proven solutions to common development problems and can suggest structural paradigms to help guide us in adding some organization to our application. I think patterns are exciting as they're effectively a grass roots effort that build upon the collective experience of skilled developers who have previously faced similar problems as we do now. Although developers 10 or 20 years ago may not have been using the same programming languages for implementing patterns, there are many lessons we can learn from their efforts. In this section, we're going to review two popular patterns – MVC and MVP. MVC (Model-View-Controller) is an architectural design pattern that encourages improved application organization through a separation of concerns. Smalltalk-80 MVC Models Views Templating Summary

C Interaction Domain Nearby: People of the Interaction Domain. Mission W3C's Interaction Domain is responsible for developing technologies that shape the Web's user interface. These technologies include (X)HTML, the markup language that started the Web. W3C Interaction Domain technologies enable millions of people every day to browse the Web and to author Web content. Industry Impact W3C: Printing and the Web [PDF] Copyright © 2001-2015 W3C ® ( MIT , ERCIM , Keio), All Rights Reserved.

Web IDL This section describes a language, Web IDL, which can be used to define interfaces for APIs in the Web platform. A specification that defines Web APIs can include one or more IDL fragments that describe the interfaces (the state and behavior that objects can exhibit) for the APIs defined by that specification. An IDL fragment is a sequence of definitions that matches the Definitions grammar symbol. The set of IDL fragments that an implementation supports is not ordered. Each definition (matching Definition) can be preceded by a list of extended attributes (matching ExtendedAttributeList), which can control how the definition will be handled in language bindings. 3.1. Every interface, partial interface definition, dictionary, partial dictionary definition, exception, enumeration, callback function and typedef (together called named definitions ) and every constant, attribute, exception field and dictionary member has an identifier , as do some operations. reserved identifiers 3.2. interface The

An HTML5 Logo | W3C Blog W3C unveiled a logo for HTML5 today. HTML5 in the broad sense covers many different technologies at varying degrees of standardization and adoption. Commercial sites have begun to take advantage of some of the technology, and we are excited that this logo will help raise awareness about HTML5 and W3C. Please check out the logo home page for information about free stickers. We are also selling T-shirts and part of the proceeds will support the HTML5 test suite effort. A number of people have already asked me “What does the logo represent?” The logo is available under a permissive license (Creative Commons 3.0 By) so that you can make it fit into your own designs. As a special treat, I’d like to introduce Michael Nieling, the Creative Director at Ocupop, the design firm that developed the logo with us. Ian Jacobs (IJ): I think the W3C community would be interested in hearing your perspectives on the design. IJ: The HTML badge is the foundation for the framework.

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