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Occam's razor

Occam's razor
William of Ockham Occam's razor (or Ockham's razor) is a principle from philosophy. Suppose two explanations are equally likely. History[change | edit source] William of Ockham, a Franciscan friar who studied logic in the 14th century, first made this principle well known.[1] In Latin it is sometimes called lex parsimoniae, or "the law of briefness". Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.[1]More things should not be used than are necessary. This means that if there are several possible ways that something might have happened, the way that uses the fewest guesses is probably the right one. Occam's razor is a principle, not an actual razor: the word 'razor' is a metaphor. Further ideas[change | edit source] A problem with Occam's razor is that the sentence is not really about things (entia = entities), but about explanations or hypotheses. "We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible." Examples[change | edit source]

Family tree of the Greek gods Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes External links Media related to Family trees of Greek mythology at Wikimedia Commons The Riddle of Epicurus or Epicurean paradox is the earliest known description of the Problem of evil, and is a famous argument against the existence of an all-powerful and providential God or gods. As translated by David Hume in the Dialogues concerning N In about 300 B.C., Epicurus eloquently summed up the problem of the existence of evil. It has come to be known as the Riddle of Epicurus or the Epicurean paradox. It was translated by David Hume in the Dialogues concerning Natural Religion: If God is willing to prevent evil, but is not able to Then He is not omnipotent.If He is able, but not willing Then He is malevolent.If He is both able and willing Then whence cometh evil?If He is neither able nor willing Then why call Him God? Tags: Epicurus, problem of evil Category: Good and Evil, Quotes About the Author (Author Profile) Erich Vieth is an attorney focusing on consumer law litigation and appellate practice.

50 Life Secrets and Tips Memorize something everyday.Not only will this leave your brain sharp and your memory functioning, you will also have a huge library of quotes to bust out at any moment. Poetry, sayings and philosophies are your best options.Constantly try to reduce your attachment to possessions.Those who are heavy-set with material desires will have a lot of trouble when their things are taken away from them or lost. Possessions do end up owning you, not the other way around. Become a person of minimal needs and you will be much more content.Develop an endless curiosity about this world.Become an explorer and view the world as your jungle. Stop and observe all of the little things as completely unique events. Read “Zen and the Art of Happiness” by Chris Prentiss.This book will give you the knowledge and instruction to be happy at all times regardless of the circumstances.

Before I Die What matters most to you Interactive public art project that invites people to share their personal aspirations in public. After losing someone she loved and falling into depression, Chang created this experiment on an abandoned house in her neighborhood to create an anonymous place to help restore perspective and share intimately with her neighbors. 2011, New Orleans, LA. Cordoba, Argentina. Najaf, Iraq. Brooklyn, NY. Almaty, Kazakhstan Savannah, GA. Pohang City, South-Korea. San Francisco, CA. Johannesburg, South Africa. Cordoba, Argentina. How to Learn Without Memorizing Photo by Edwin Stemp Rote memorization is an inefficient way to learn. Just retaining a single formula can mean pounding the same information into your skull dozens of times. If your computer hard drive had this accuracy, you’d probably throw it out. Unfortunately, you’re stuck with your brain. A few years ago, I noticed that smart people seemed to learn differently than most other people. While there are undoubtedly some genetic advantages that allow some people to learn effortlessly, I think part of this difference in success comes down to strategy. Is Your Brain a File Drawer or a Web of Ideas? A computer stores information as thousands of electrical 1s and 0s in a linear fashion. However, your brain isn’t a sequence of bits and bytes, so this approach doesn’t make sense. Other Forms of Learning What I’d like to advocate in this article is a more creative, spontaneous form of learning than the style you were probably coached for in school. 1. 2. 3. Examples: 4. 5. 6. 7.

The Top 5 Astronomical Events to Witness Before You Die | Fun Lists - Top 10 Lists In the age of internet, television, and Lady Gaga, it’s easy to ignore the dazzling displays the sky gives us every night. In ancient times, however, human civilizations based their entire calendar, and thus their way of life, upon what they saw in the cosmos. While humanity’s interest in astronomy has diminished over the centuries, the sky remains nonetheless spectacular. Few people have the time to go stargazing every night, but here are 5 celestial events so awe-inspiring, everyone must see them in their lifetime. 5. Next Occurrence: August 9-14, 2011 Every August, the night sky lights up with a dazzling display known as the Perseid meteor shower. 4. Next Occurrence: June 15, 2011 in Africa Ever get bored with the predictably drab hue of the moon? 3. Occurrence: Year round More commonly known as the Northern Lights, Aurora is a fantastic light display that occurs at extreme Northern or Southern latitudes. 2. 1. Top 10 Amazing Stars in the Universe (toptenz.net) Shortlink:

11 Things that Fill Me with Awe Eleven Things that Fill Me with Awe The unimaginable vastness of what exists. Our visible universe has about ten billion galaxies, and those galaxies have an average of about ten billion stars each. But according to theories gaining support from reputable cosmologists, this looks like just a vanishingly small fraction of what exists. If Andrei Linde is correct, the visible universe is just a tiny bubble within our overall universe, and it's even possible that subregions of inflating bubbles could themselves inflate, ad infinitum. That the properties of the universe are conducive (perhaps even almost optimally conducive) to life. Several scientists and philosophers, from Fred Hoyle to Martin Rees, have observed that the physical properties of our universe are what would be needed for life to emerge. That the apparently mindless process of evolution can, and even tends to, result in forms of increasing complexity, beauty, and value. That there is something rather than nothing.

70 Reminders to Help You Break Any Barrier I am pleased to introduce this guest article by a new friend John, the creator of HiLife2B, where he hopes to inspire people and to help them achieve their dreams. Follow him on Twitter: @janyasor 1. Believe that even the smallest compliment can save someone’s life 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70.

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« Il semble que la perfection soit atteinte non quand il n'y a plus rien à ajouter, mais quand il n'y a plus rien à retrancher », Terre des hommes ch.III, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry by noosquest May 30

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