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Tech & Tools

Tech & Tools

http://webjournalist.org/topics/tools/

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Google search tips for journalists Google search tips for journalists Google’s Stephen Rosenthal came in to the WSJ today to deliver a presentation on Google tools for journalists (there’s a video here as it was done via a Google Hangout On Air). One of the things Stephen did was go through the Google search operators. I’m listing the most useful ones for journalists. Some of these were shared by Stephen and I have added a couple more. A site search

New open source tool to help reporters rethink quotes in stories Credit: Image from Thinkstock Quotes are often the most interesting part of a story. They can help the audience relate or identify more with the topic and strengthen the reporting, but quoting a source in text often doesn't do justice to the impact their words could have in audio or video form. Does My Web Site Suck 165 Mortal Sins That Will Send Your Site to Web Design Hell Checklist 1 | Checklist 2 | What do I do now? | The Top 30 Web Design Mistakes

46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom Infographics are interesting–a mash of (hopefully) easily-consumed visuals (so, symbols, shapes, and images) and added relevant character-based data (so, numbers, words, and brief sentences). The learning application for them is clear, with many academic standards–including the Common Core standards–requiring teachers to use a variety of media forms, charts, and other data for both information reading as well as general fluency. It’s curious they haven’t really “caught on” in schools considering how well they bridge both the old-form textbook habit of cramming tons of information into a small space, while also neatly overlapping with the dynamic and digital world. So if you want to try to make infographics–or better yet have students make them–where do you start? The 46 tools below, curated by Faisal Khan, are a good place to start.

NatGeo Mapmaker Interactive Customize the map and save it to make it your own with bookmarks, drawings, labels, and more. To save your map, you will need to enter your email address and the system will send you a set of links to use to edit and share your map. 20 tools and resources every journalist should experiment with Tools have always come from the need to carry out a specific task more effectively. It's one of the main differences between human beings and the rest of the animal kingdom. We may still be slaves to the same old evolutionary urges but we sure know how to eat noodles in style.

How to hide files and folders in Windows XP – The easy way Ok, so here’s a quick little tip for those people who want to hide a particular file or folder on their computers, but don’t feel like spending $40 on a piece of software for that one single purpose! This method of hiding files and folders in Windows XP is quite rudimentary, which means that if someone knows what they are doing with computers, it could be found pretty easily. However, it’s a great way to hide folders from people like your parents or people who only know how to check their email and that’s it!

Chart and image gallery: 30+ free tools for data visualization and analysis The chart below originally accompanied our story 22 free tools for data visualization and analysis (April 20, 2011). We're updating it as we cover additional tools, including 8 cool tools for data analysis, visualization and presentation (March 27, 2012) and Six useful JavaScript libraries for maps, charts and other data visualizations (March 6, 2013). Click through to those articles for full tool reviews. Features: You can sort the chart by clicking on any column header once to sort in ascending order and a second time to sort by descending (browser JavaScript required). Skill levels are represented as numbers from easiest to most difficult to learn and use: Users who are comfortable with basic spreadsheet tasksUsers who are technically proficient enough not to be frightened off by spending a couple of hours learning a new applicationPower usersUsers with coding experience or specialized knowledge in a field like GIS or network analysis.

Creating Animated Bubble Charts in D3 - Jim Vallandingham Update: I moved the code to its own github repo – to make it easier to consume and maintain. Recently, the New York Times featured a bubble chart of the proposed budget for 2013 by Shan Carter . It features some nice, organic, animations, and smooth transitions that add a lot of visual appeal to the graphic. This was all done using D3.js . How to hide files in JPEG pictures If you’re looking to hide files on your PC hard drive, you may have read about ways to encrypt folders or change the attributes on a file so that they cannot be accessed by prying eyes. However, a lot of times hiding files or folders in that way requires that you install some sort of software on your computer, which could then be spotted by someone else. I’ve actually written quite a few articles on how you can hide files and folders in Windows XP and Vista before, but here I’m going to show you a new way to hide files that is very counter-intuitive and therefore pretty safe! Using a simple trick in Windows, you can actually hide a file inside of the JPG picture file! You can actually hide any type of file inside of an image file, including txt, exe, mp3, avi, or whatever else. Not only that, you can actually store many files inside of single JPG file, not just one!

Getting started in data journalism: the first steps in a story Data journalism can be a daunting task for some, so Steve Doig, professor of journalism at the University of Arizona, ran through the first steps for delegates at the International Journalism Festival yesterday. Finding story ideas Data is everywhere now, he said, and most social issues or human interest stories will have some data tied to it somewhere. Analyzing the Top 30 Infographics on Visually Ever wonder what makes an infographic successful? Why do some infographics accumulate more than 1 million views and others, barely 100? We’ve talked about viral infographics before, from a creative process standpoint: the story, data and design of an infographic all play a role in whether it will appeal to the masses, as does the way it is promoted. But what does viral content have in common?

Binary - it's digitalicious! How binary works: The binary number system (aka base 2) represents values using two symbols, typically 0 and 1. Computers call these bits. A bit is either off (0) or on (1). When arranged in sets of 8 bits (1 byte) 256 values can be represented (0-255). Using an ASCII chart, these values can be mapped to characters and text can be stored.

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