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What Education Technology Could Look Like Over the Next Five Years

What Education Technology Could Look Like Over the Next Five Years
In a fast-moving field like education technology, it’s worth taking a moment to take stock of new developments, persistent trends and the challenges to effective tech implementation in real classrooms. The NMC Horizon 2015 K-12 report offers a snapshot of where ed tech stands now and where it is likely to go in the next five years, according to 56 education and technology experts from 22 countries. Deeper Learning: The expert panel identified several long-term trends that will greatly influence the adoption of technology in classrooms over the next five years and beyond. They see worldwide educators focusing on “deeper learning” outcomes that try to connect what happens in the classroom to experts and experiences beyond school as an important trend. Teachers at the cutting edge of this work are asking students to use technology to access and synthesize information in the service of finding solutions to multifaceted, complex problems they might encounter in the real world.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/06/29/what-education-technology-could-look-like-over-the-next-five-years/

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What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like? At a time when public libraries are starting to offer everything from community gardening plots to opportunities to check out humans for conversations, some school libraries are similarly re-evaluating their roles and expanding their offerings. Case in point: Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Virginia. When librarian Joan Ackroyd arrived there four years ago, she found an environment very different from the “engaging, creative, fun” elementary and middle school libraries to which she was accustomed. Digital vs Digitized Learning As teachers begin to shift toward greater personalized learning experiences for students, their initial steps build upon what they already know from face-to-face instruction. Districts usually provide teachers with easy to use Learning Management Systems (LMS) that can facilitate new learning opportunities with technology. However, the greatest potential of learning with technology tools is that teachers and students can transform the traditional learning environment, processes, and products. Just providing teachers with an organizational tool, such as an LMS, will not lead to transformative practices. Teachers need on-going support if they are to truly transform their classrooms into ecosystems for digital age learning.

Teacher’s Guide to Polling in the Classrooms After you’ve introduced your class to the concept of derivatives, how can you be sure your students understood the topic? How can you increase student-to-student interaction? So many teachers feel like they only get feedback from the most outgoing students. School libraries face a bleak future as leaders try to balance the books I remember my school library: it had two floors with spiral staircases, individual study cubicles and a classroom on the upper floor. It was attached to the sixth form block, giving the students easy access to a study facility. One particular memory is of a Puffin Books sale – I could even tell you the books I bought (and still have). This was in the days before personal computing so the only source of information – apart from other people, TV or radio – was books. There was something tactile about walking up to a shelf, looking along the spines and selecting a book which you hoped would answer the question posed in your homework or choosing a work of fiction by reading the blurb on the back. In recent years the picture has changed; the proliferation of personal electronic devices means information is instantly available almost anywhere and the printed word is in decline.

U.S. millennials post ‘abysmal’ scores in tech skills test, lag behind foreign peers American millennials did not do well on this test. (Bigstock photo) There was this test. And it was daunting. A Day in the Life of the Internet Infographic Posted by Dana Kilroy on 19 Feb 2015 / 2 Comments Can you even remember what life was like before the internet? Neither can we. But to get an idea of just how big a part of our lives it has become, literally, just take a look at this inforgraphic. The numbers will blow your mind. • 210 billion emails are sent out daily — that’s more than a year’s worth of U.S. mail.

How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning Back when I was in school, libraries were all about books — books, books and more books. During my frequent visits to the library, I would pore through encyclopedias and fill out countless checkout cards before heading home with a backpack full of reading material. Of course, teachers also scheduled regular media time so students could use the library’s computer pod, but technology wasn’t nearly as integral to the library experience as it is today. The advent of the digital age had a profound impact on school libraries.

Education Week Published Online: October 29, 2014 By Brianna Crowley If students are “glued” 24/7 to their mobile devices, why is it necessary for schools to teach digital literacy? Who should teach it? And wait … what does it even mean to be “digitally literate”? 8 K-12 tech tools to watch in 2015 Over the last few years, technology has reshaped the classroom in many ways — and is continuing to do so. From digital textbooks and platforms that make teaching often-complex STEM subjects simpler to deep data analytics that measure and predict student achievement, ed tech is addressing a number of issues in the nation's schools. Even so, there's such a large amount of tools and platforms out there now that it can be difficult to see some of the most promising developments in the space. To make it easier, we've selected eight of our favorites that districts and schools should have on their radars.

School Libraries and Makerspaces: Can They Coexist? More and more schools are coming to value maker education and exploring ways to create makerspaces in their schools. Many schools are discussing how they might utilize their library to facilitate this. As my school has increased our commitment to constructionist learning and maker education over the last few years, we have done so in close collaboration with our school library. In exploring the relationship between the school library and school makerspace, it's not difficult to see why conversations about the growth of makerspaces are often tied to the conversation about the future of libraries. Both makerspaces and libraries are constructivist learning spaces that share a number of common goals, while approaching them in different ways and through very different material resources.

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