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3D Printing

3D Printing
You are in: Future Technologies : 3D Printing 3D Printing Imagine a future in which a device connected to a computer can print a solid object. A future in which we can have tangible goods as well as intangible services delivered to our desktops or highstreet shops over the Internet. And a future in which the everyday "atomization" of virtual objects into hard reality has turned the mass pre-production and stock-holding of a wide range of goods and spare parts into no more than an historical legacy. Such a future may sound like it is being plucked from the worlds of Star Trek. The following provides an overview of 3D printing technologies and their present and likely future application. Current Technologies 3D printing is an additive technology in which objects are built up in a great many very thin layers. Another 3D printing technology based on the selective solidification of a tank of liquid -- or 'vat polymerization' -- is DLP projection. Commercial 3D Printers and Online Services

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Robotics - Gizmag In both an impressive display of innovative technology and a glimpse of a future in which humans could be redundant, Volvo has shown off its Robot-based Autonomous Refuse handling (ROAR) project. The system uses drones to locate refuse bins and robots to collect and empty them. Read More Two marine scientists have shown that autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) can be programmed to make independent decisions and trigger new missions in real time based on data coming from multiple sensors. They believe this could reveal much about the life of squid and other marine creatures. Read More 3D Printing: What You Need to Know They're not your granddad's daisy wheel printer, or your mom's dot matrix. In fact, they bear little resemblance to today's document or photo printers, which can only print in boring old two dimension. As their name suggests, 3D printers can build objects from scratch out of a variety of materials. They're going mainstream, showing up at retailers such as Staples, Best Buy, and Home Depot, and you can buy numerous 3D printers and their supplies on Amazon.com and through other online outlets.

3D printing will explode in 2014, thanks to the expiration of key patents - Quartz Here’s what’s holding back 3D printing, the technology that’s supposed to revolutionize manufacturing and countless other industries: patents. In February 2014, key patents that currently prevent competition in the market for the most advanced and functional 3D printers will expire, says Duann Scott, design evangelist at 3D printing company Shapeways. These patents cover a technology known as “laser sintering,” the lowest-cost 3D printing technology. Because of its high resolution in all three dimensions, laser sintering can produce goods that can be sold as finished products. Whenever someone talks about 3D printing revolutionizing manufacturing, they’re talking about the kinds of goods produced by, for example, the industrial-grade 3D printing machines used by Shapeways.

3D printing provides a vision of manufacturing's future (w/ video) Dan Mishek, co-owner and head of VistaTek, with a prototype bust of Walt Disney. It was made using 3D printing technology at Mishek's company in Vadnais Heights. (Pioneer Press: Richard Marshall) Dan Mishek and his siblings operate VistaTek, a small manufacturing concern in Vadnais Heights started by his parents 15 years ago. To hear him tell it, they're running Santa's workshop.

3D Printing Directory You are in: Future Technologies : 3D Printing Directory 3D Printing Directory 3D printing creates real, solid objects one layer at a time using digital data. 3D printing may therefore soon do for manufacturing and medicine what computers and the Internet have already done for the creation, processing and storage of information. For an explanation of 3D printing technologies, opportunities and implications, please see the 3D Printing page, my 3D Printing videos, or my book 3D Printing: The Next Industrial Revolution. The 3D printing marketplace is now evolving extremely quickly.

Humanoid Robot Starts Work at Japanese Department Store Dressed in a kimono and smiling, Aiko Chihira greets shoppers at the entrance of Tokyo's Mitsukoshi department store. But Chihira is no regular employee -- she is a humanoid robot. Developed by Toshiba last year, the robot made its debut at the store on Monday in a new role interacting with customers. Speaking Japanese, Chihira, which has human-like features and blinks, can also be programmed to speak in other languages such as Chinese. What is 3D printing? 3D printing is a method of manufacturing everything from shoes to jewelery, to guns and aerospace parts, using a computer-controlled printer. The fundamental rule of 3D printing is that it’s an additive manufacturing technique, unlike machining, turning, milling, and sawing which are subtractive. While there are different kinds of 3D printing, all 3D objects are generally built out of layers. A 3D printer starts with the bottom layer, waits for it to dry or solidify, and then works its way up. This layering process differs depending on the printer and the material it works with — metal, plaster, polymer, resin — but it also depends on whether it’s an industrial or commercial 3D printer. Industrial vs. commercial

A very cool new video: A brief introduction to 4D printing It’s not often that you see a designer throw their creation on the ground and break it to smithereens. But that’s exactly what TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits does in the video above. Why? Because he works in the Self-Assembly Lab at MIT. When the pieces break apart, they quickly re-assemble themselves, as if the film were playing in reverse. In this video, Tibbits also explains his concept of 4D printing. How 3D Printing is Changing the World A wide range of new technologies have been developed recently to enable the process of 3D printing. However, 3D printing processes are often described under the label “additive manufacturing”, as they are very different to traditional 2D paper printing. 3D printing begins with CAD software, where a design is saved and sent to the printer.

Nokia Releases 3D Print Files For Lumia 820 Smartphone. Got A 3D Printer? Custom Print Your Own Removable Shell Now this is cool: mobile maker Nokia has released 3D print files for one of its smartphones so owners of 3D printers can custom print their own removable shell. Nokia already sells different colour shells for the handset in question, the Lumia 820 — which has a removable backplate — along with shells that add wireless charging to the device or offer a bit more protection to standard plastic shells. But the company has decided to spice things up further by releasing a 3D template so people can print their own custom designs. It’s calling this a 3DK for short — see what they did there? Writing in a blog post on Nokia Conversations, Nokia says: “We are going to release 3D templates, case specs, recommended materials and best practices — everything someone versed in 3D printing needs to print their own custom Lumia 820 case.

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